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Blohm und Voss Bv 237


Blohm und Voss Bv 237

The Blohm und Voss Bv 237 was a design for an asymmetric dive-bomber largely based on the earlier Bv 141 reconnaissance aircraft.

The Bv 141 had carried its single engine in a long boom that ended in the tail plane. The glazed crew compartment was to its right, connected by a short central wing section. This gave the crew an excellent view, but did complicate the development of the aircraft, and by 1943 it had been abandoned.

Dr-Ing Richad Vogt's design team at Blohm und Voss continued to work on asymmetric aircraft. Work on project P.177 began in 1942. This would have been a single-seat dive bomber or two man ground attack aircraft, with the pilot in a more standard right-hand nacelle, heavily protected by armour, and the engine in the main boom on the left, following the same basic layout as the Bv 141. Bombs were to be carried below the wings. The ground attack version would have carried up to 8 guns, while the dive-bomber had two forward and two rear firing guns as well as up to 2,205lb of bombs. The proposed B-1 version was also to carry a Jumo 004B jet engine in a third nacelle.

Blohm und Voss were given a production order for the P.177, as the Bv 237 early in 1943. After the bombing raids on Hamburg in the summer of 1943 development was suspended for a period, but it soon resumed. One key element of the design was the use of wood and steel in place of light metals, which by 1944 were in short supply in Germany. Blohm und Voss were working on ways to simply the overall production of the aircraft, which was expected to begin in mid-1945, but towards the end of 1944 the plans for a pre-production 0-series of aircraft was cancelled, leaving the project at the mock-up stage.


Design and development

In 1942 the Luftwaffe was interested in replacing the venerable but ageing Junkers Ju 87, and Dr. Richard Vogt's design team at Blohm & Voss began work on project P 177. [1] The dive bomber version would have had a one-man crew with two fixed forward firing 15   mm (0.591   in) MG 151 cannon and two rear firing 13   mm (0.512   in) MG 131 machine guns, carrying 2,000   kg (4,400   lb) of bombs.

A two-seat ground attack version was also proposed with two fixed forward firing 15   mm (0.591   in) MG 151 cannon, three forward firing 30   mm (1.181   in) MK 103 cannon with six 70   kg (150   lb) bombs. [2]

A final B-1 type was to incorporate a Junkers Jumo 004B turbojet engine in a third nacelle slung underneath the wing, between the piston engine and the cockpit. [3]

In early 1943 the B&V design, now called the BV 237, was shown to Hitler and he ordered it into production. However the order was not carried out. [4] In the summer, Allied bombing raids over Hamburg caused no damage to the Blohm and Voss facilities, but the Ministry of Aviation ordered all developmental work stopped. Work continued later and it was determined that construction could begin in mid 1945, but plans for a pre-production A-0 series were abandoned, leaving the project at the pre-production stage near the end of 1944, [1] with only a wooden mock-up completed. [3]


Blohm and Voss Bv P.210 (Volksjager)

Authored By: Staff Writer | Last Edited: 08/05/2019 | Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com | The following text is exclusive to this site.

The "Volksjager" program - or "People's Fighter" began in September of 1944 as an offshoot of the "Emergency Fighter Program" (EFP) with the goal of finding a design that could be cheaply produced, at speed, and in the numbers needed to curtail the Allied bomber onslaught afflicting Germany in World War 2 (1939-1945). In addition to this, the aircraft would have to be reasonably simple to fly and maintain, lending itself well to the stock of raw recruits envisioned to pilot the People's Fighter. The largely disposable design was written around a requirement for a lightweight, high-speed fighter-interceptor powered by a single BMW 003 series turbojet engine.

While many entries were considered, winner rights fell to the Heinkel He 162 with its over-fuselage jet-mounted engine and split tail arrangement. Despite some 320 units being constructed before war's end in 1945, what aircraft of this stock were available for fighting did little to change Germany's fortunes in its failing war effort.

Another concept was drawn up by ship-builder and large aeroplane-maker Blohm-und-Voss (BV) which proposed futuristic-looking designs like the Bv P.210. This aircraft was a further evolution of the company's proposed P.209.01. The P.210 was of extremely compact dimensions and well-streamlined for the expected high-speed flying envelopes. It was to fit its BMW 003A-1/B turbojet of 1,765lb - 1,800lb thrust output directly into the aft section of the fuselage, aspirated at the nose by a small, rounded intake and exhausted at the rear through a similar fitting. The cockpit was positioned over the ductwork and towards the nose with little framing used for excellent vision for the single pilot. A wholly retractable tricycle undercarriage was penciled in for ground-running. Construction of the aircraft would have involved steel.

The primary interesting quality of this little fighter were its mainplanes: set low against the sides of the fuselage and at midships. These members were given substantial sweepback along both the leading and trailing edges, so much so that the wings terminated at the nearly the same line as the exhaust port. As the fuselage did not mount tail surfaces of any sort, these were installed at the wingtips and slightly cranked downward which, combined with the upward angle of the mainplanes, gave the aircraft a gull-type wing (similar in respect to the Bv P.208 offering detailed elsewhere on this site).

Proposed armament was the typical twin cannon fit: 2 x 30mm MK108 automatic guns, one seated to either side of the nose.

Beyond its turbojet engine propulsion scheme, engineers proposed Rocket-Assisted Take-Offs (RATOs) for their little bomber-interceptor as optional - this designed to get the aircraft to altitude in as little time as possible.

As drawn up, the P.210 had a running length of 23 feet, wingspan of 27.6 feet, and a height of 8.5 feet.

The P.210 eventually suffered from what most of Blohm & Voss's proposals suffered - there simply was not enough interest in radical designs despite the desperate nature of the war heading into 1945. As such, the P.210 fell to the wayside as the He 162 rose to some prominence before the end of the war. Nevertheless, such designs give some insight into the possibilities that were being entertained going into the war's final year - a chance to envision what the air war might have looked like should the conflict had gone on beyond the summer of 1945.


History during the Nazi era

With the rise of the Nazi Party to power in 1933, Germany's rearmament in violation of the Versailles Treaty had begun. This began a sudden change in fortune for the company, run then by brothers Rudolf and Walther Blohm, which was taken out of a deep crisis. Until then specialising in shipbuilding, the company began to design and build aircraft for the German state airline, pre-war Deutsche Luft Hansa and the Luftwaffe. The aeronautical section of the company was named Hamburger Flugzeugbau, therefore the first planes it produced had the code "Ha", but in September 1937 the aviation subsidiary was renamed Abteilung Flugzeugbau der Schiffswerft Blohm & Voss, later replaced by "BV". [4] Particularly noteworthy were the large flying boats the company produced, especially the largest aircraft designed, built and flown by any of the Axis forces, the Bv 238, and its ingenious approaches to aircraft building that even featured asymmetric designs.

From July 1944 to April 1945 the company used inmates of its own concentration subcamp at its shipyard in Hamburg-Steinwerder, a subcamp of Neuengamme concentration camp. [5] A memorial stands on the site of the camp and the company continues to pay an undisclosed amount to the Fund for Compensation of Forced Laborers. [6]


Quick Description

The Blohm & Voss P 212 was a proposed jet fighter designed by Blohm & Voss for the Emergency Fighter Program Luftwaffe design competition during the Second World War.

In early 1945, a replacement was sought for the Heinkel He 162 Volksjäger under the continuing Emergency Fighter Program, challenging engineers to develop a new aircraft built around the Heinkel HeS 011, a new jet engine which was being developed, in order to create a better high-altitude fighter jet. By February 1945, the Luftwaffe had received several proposals. Three proposals had been received from Messerschmitt, two from Focke-Wulf and one each from Heinkel, Junkers and Blohm & Voss respectively. The competition was won by the Junkers EF 128, a broadly similar design.

The third version, the P 212.03, boasted a further lengthened fuselage with a pressurized cockpit and larger internal fuel tanks. Its wings were swept back at forty degrees. Uniquely, the wings were designed to be made out of either wood, steel or aluminium as available. With an ideal fuel weight, the aircraft could fly for up to four hours at a time. This was the model presented to the Luftwaffe.


Design and development [ edit ]

In 1942 the Luftwaffe was interested in replacing the venerable but ageing Junkers Ju 87, and Dr. Richard Vogt's design team at Blohm & Voss began work on project P 177. Ώ] The dive bomber version would have had a one-man crew with two fixed forward firing 15 mm (0.591 in) MG 151 cannon and two rear firing 13 mm (0.512 in) MG 131 machine guns, carrying 2,000 kg (4,400 lb) of bombs.

A two-seat ground attack version was also proposed with two fixed forward firing 15 mm (0.591 in) MG 151 cannon, three forward firing 30 mm (1.181 in) MK 103 cannon with six 70 kg (150 lb) bombs. ΐ]

A final B-1 type was to incorporate a Junkers Jumo 004B turbojet engine in a third nacelle slung underneath the wing, between the piston engine and the cockpit. Α]

In early 1943 the B&V design, now called the BV 237, was shown to Hitler and he ordered it into production. However the order was not carried out. Β] In the summer, Allied bombing raids over Hamburg caused no damage to the Blohm and Voss facilities, but the Ministry of Aviation ordered all developmental work stopped. Work continued later and it was determined that construction could begin in mid 1945, but plans for a pre-production A-0 series were abandoned, leaving the project at the pre-production stage near the end of 1944, Ώ] with only a wooden mock-up completed. Α]


Why choose blohm+voss?

We have extensive space at our Hamburg shipyard and specialised workshops outfitted with the necessary tools and expert equipment for complex projects.

With our parent company Lürssen, we benefit from a wealth of experience and resources in the new build and ship repair industry that we are able to draw upon.

Customers can rely on us to complete projects on time and in budget as we provide all services from a single source, from planning to spare parts, to installation and after sales.

We care about the safety standards of our shipyard and our employees. We are also committed to the environment and are conscious of our carbon footprint.

Located in the maritime hub of Hamburg, we have an impressive local supplier network and access to any spare parts or sub-contractor required for a project.

Our experienced workforce and dedicated project managers ensure our services are of a high quality standard and meet all necessary regulations and legislation.


Blohm und Voss Bv 237 - History

78 resin parts +

Clear resin canopies, decals

Unit price: US$ 78

Between 1942 and 1944 the Blohm and Voss design team submitted to RLM a number of project proposals for long-range bombers. One design for a reconnaissance and bomber proposed under the project designation P.184.01 was come from mind of Blohm and Voss cheif designer and head of the project bureau, Dr-Ing Richard Vogt. An unusual feature of the P.184 was its long and almost untapered wing. It was intended to carry more fuel in the box shaped wing spar that ran the length of the wing. The P.184 fuselage was likewise constructed entirely of steel. The wing was to be covered by skin of 2mm steel-sheet. The simple construction and use of steel as a building material ensured that the P.184 met all the requirements laid down in the RLM specification. In the event, the deteriorating war situation prevented further development of most long-range bomber designs.

Long-range heavy bomber

Intended to designe as a long-range bomber

4x BMW 9-801 radial engines

The Blohm & Voss Bv.P.184 package contents secret kits of four 1/144 Luftwaffe airplanes as bonus:

The Blohm and Voss P.184 is suitable to group with the following collection series.


The ugly but beautiful German Flugboot: the Blohm & Voss BV 238

The journey of the famous German ship building and engineering company Blohm & Voss commenced on April 5, 1877, when Herman Blohm and Ernst Voss got together to set the foundation stone for their brainchild.

The company got their first kick start during the Second World War, when the engineers at Blohm and Voss started building flying boats for various clients with distinctive success results.

Six 1,287 kW (1,750 hp) Daimler-Benz DB 603 inverted V12 piston engines were used in total, arranged in three forward-facing engine nacelles on each wing. Photo Credit

When the company started, a shipyard was constructed on Kuhwereder island near the Free and Henseatic City of Hamburg that covered some 1500 meter square of the area.

The yard had a large 250 meters of water frontage and carried three berths, with the capacity to handle two large ships of length 100 meters or less.

Each engine’s coolant radiator was placed in a chin cowl directly under the engine, bearing an almost identical appearance to those fitted to the Do 217M medium bomber and some examples of the Do 217J night fighter, possibly as standardized Kraftei (“power-egg”) unitized engine modules. Photo Credit

The company has a very simplistic logo with that bears its name on rounded corners with white letters up until 1955, the name of the company was shown with the ampersand.

For over a century and twenty-five years, Blohm & Voss continued its operations as a major manufacturer of large ships and other heavy machinery. In the aftermath of the Second World War, the company was thought to have been completely demolished, however, it stood back up and now builds warships for Germany and exports a fair amount of oil drilling equipment and ships for a number of commercial customers.

Nazi Germany’s attempt to build an impenetrable Army and Air Force in open defiance to the Versailles Treaty by considerable rearmament gave the crumbling Blohm & Voss the fuel it desperately needed to re-establish and then later re-brand itself.

The sole completed BV 238 was strafed and sunk while docked on Schaalsee. Sources differ regarding the date, the attackers and the attack aircraft used. Photo Credit

The company was then run by brothers Rudolf Blohm and Walther Blohm, who saw an opportunity to significantly change the fortunes of the company by going along with the Nazi party’s rearmament plans. Until then, the company only specialized in building ships, but after signing a new client i.e. the Nazi party, the company stepped in the design and construction of aircraft for the German state airline, Deutsche Luft Hansa, and of course the Luftwaffe.

One dark aspect that still haunts Blohm & Voss is the fact that, towards the end of the Second World War, the company used the prisoners of a work camp (some suggest the camp was, in fact, a concentration subcamp run by the Blohm & Voss) to work at its shipyard in Hamburg-Steinwerder.

According to American sources, the BV 238 V1 was destroyed September 1944 by P-51 Mustangs of the US 361st Fighter Group. The lead Mustang, Detroit Miss, was piloted by Lieutenant Urban “Ben” Drew, and another was piloted by William Photo Credit

Rogers. Drew was told after the attack that he had destroyed a BV 222 Wiking, another large flying boat. Photo Credit

He continued to believe this was the case until he was contacted by the BBC in 1974 for a documentary and told that their research had determined that the aircraft he had destroyed was actually the BV 238 V1, undergoing flight tests at the seaplane base at Schaalsee. Photo Credit

In the aftermath of the war, a memorial was built at the campsite and the company is thought to have been paying an undisclosed amount to the compensation towards the forced labor.

German sources, based in part on the testimony of nearby inhabitants and Blohm & Voss employees, claim that the BV 238 V1 was discovered by the RAF between 23 April and 26 April 1945. Photo Credit

Perhaps the most prominent achievement of the Blohm & Voss is its most celebrated flying boat simply known as BV238.

The Allies were reportedly concerned that Adolf Hitler could use it to escape to South America, and so an attack followed shortly afterwards. Photo Credit

The aircraft was attacked by Hawker Typhoons, or Hawker Tempests. Their strafing set the engines alight, and the aircraft burnt and sank with only part of a wing remaining above the surface. Photo Credit

According to the British, the attack happened on 4 May 1945. During the strafing, the back of the flying boat broke and the forward part of the plane sank into the water. Photo Credit

Production of two other prototypes was begun but neither was finished. A ¼-scale model of the BV 238 was made during the plane’s development for testing. Known as the FGP 227, it made a forced landing during its first flight and did not provide any data to the program. Photo Credit

Guns: 8 x 13 mm (0.512 in) MG 131 machine guns with 1,800 rpg 4 in each nose and tail turret 8 x 13 mm (0.512 in) MG 131 machine guns with 900 rpg 4 in each wing mounted turret 4 x 13 mm (0.512 in) MG 131 machine guns with 500 rpg 2 (as a twinned MG 131Z) in each manually aimed beam/waist position 2 x 20 mm (0.787 in) MG 151/20 autocannon with 1,400 rpg in forward dorsal turret. Photo Credit

What made the BV 238 stand out among other war machinery of the Second World War was its sheer size when it first flew in 1944 it was the heaviest aircraft flown by any country during the war.


Blohm & Voss Bv 238

During the Second World War, the German Reich Army was known for constructing war machineries that were either the heaviest or the largest to have domination over the skies. One of these machineries is the Blohm & Voss Bv 238 which was considered to be the largest aircraft ever to be produced by any of the Axis powers of World War Two.

The BV 238 was designed as a floatplane and it was intended to be the so huge to provide the German Army with additional loading capacity during WW2. Weighing at 54,000 kilograms, this WW2 German aircraft used six 1750 HP piston engines that were produced by the Daimler-Benz company. The engines, which were face forwarding, were installed on a high monoplane wing design. Each wing was mounted with three engines each.

The first prototype of the BV 238 saw flight in 1944 and had shown great potential as a floatplane. This WW2 aircraft showed excellent performance because it carried a large payload and had tremendous range and speed for an aircraft of that size.

Had the BV 238 been produced in full-scale, the German Army would have had an excellent floatplane in their arsenal of aircrafts. However, only one BV 238 was ever completed during WW2 and this prototype was sunk while it was being docked and repaired on Lake Schaal in 1944. The planes responsible for the sinking of the only mammoth BV2 238 were three P-51 Mustangs belonging to Allied Forces and which were led by Lt. Urban Drew. It was later found out that the BV 238 was still undergoing flight testing when it was destroyed and sunk. Besides being the largest aircraft to be produced during WW2, the BV 238 is also recognized as being the largest aircraft to be destroyed by an Allied Force pilot.


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