Information

USS Hornet prior to commissioning


USS Hornet prior to commissioning

The carrier USS Hornet seen on 20 October 1941, when entering the Naval base at which she was about to be commissioned.


USS Hornet prior to commissioning - History

The Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) is the eighth Nimitz-class aircraft carrier of the United States Navy, named after the 33rd President of the United States, Harry S. Truman. HST was authorized and laid down as USS United States but her name was changed in February 1995 at the direction of then Secretary of the Navy John H. Dalton. The keel was laid by Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company on November 29, 1993, and the ship was christened on September 7, 1996. Margaret Truman Daniel, the daughter of the late President, served as sponsor of the ship. Capt. Thomas G. Otterbein is the first commanding officer.

July 12, 1997 Three Newport News shipworkers died during construction when a pump room filled with methane and hydrogen sulfide gases during a sewage leak.

June 8, 1998 The Pre Commissioning Unit (PCU) Harry S. Truman departed Newport News Shipyard for the first time to conduct Builder's sea trials Underway for acceptance trials from June 22-25.

July 2, PCU Harry S. Truman moved from Newport News to Pier 2 on Naval Station Norfolk.

July 25, USS Harry S. Truman was officially commissioned during a ceremony at Norfolk, Virginia.

August 13, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier departed homeport for a two-week underway to conduct flight deck certification. The first aircraft catapult launch and arrested landing on Aug. 13.

From September 15-23, the Truman was underway for Fleet Carrier Qualifications and reactor drills.

October 5, USS Harry S. Truman arrived in Port Everglades, Fla., for a three-day visit to participate in Fleet Week Ft. Lauderdale.

October 17, The Truman departed Naval Station Norfolk for a Friends and Family Day Cruise.

November 2, CVN 75 departed homeport for a six-week Shakedown Cruise in the Puerto Rican Op. Area Port visit to Mayport, Fla., to onload the Air Wing personnel from Nov. 8-10.

November 25, The Harry S. Truman anchored off St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, for a five-day port visit Returned home on Dec. 17.

January 27, 1999 USS Harry S. Truman departed Norfolk for Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) and Fleet Carrier Qualifications (CQ) in the Cherry Point and Jacksonville Op. Areas.

From March 3-15, the HST was underway for F/A-18E/F CNO project testing and Fleet CQ Conducted first carrier landings of the "Super Hornet."

March 20, The Harry S. Truman departed Norfolk for a two-day Tiger Cruise to Newport News Shipbuilding to commence a five-month Post Shakedown Availability (PSA).

July 30, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier moved "dead-stick" to Pier 12 on Naval Station Norfolk Underway for sea trials from Aug. 18-19 U nderway for flight deck certification from Aug. 25- Sept. 2.

September 15, The Truman emergency sortied from Naval Station Norfolk to evade the Hurricane Floyd.

From Sept. 21-29, USS Harry S. Truman was underway for another round of FRS/Fleet CQ Port visit to Halifax, Nova Scotia, from Sept. 30- Oct. 2.

October 26, The Harry S. Truman departed homeport for Carrier Qualifications with the FRS, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3 and Training Command (TRACOM).

November 19, Capt. David L. Logsdon relieved Capt. Thomas G. Otterbein as commanding officer of the CVN 75 Underway again for FRS/Fleet/Training CQ from Dec. 3-14.

September 1, 2000 The Harry S. Truman BG returned to homeport after completing Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) Underway for Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) in October.

November 28, USS Harry S. Truman departed Naval Station Norfolk for its maiden deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet Areas of Responsibility (AoR).

December 20, The Truman pulled into Souda Bay, Crete, Greece, for a four-day port call Transited the Suez Canal on Dec. 27.

January 2, 2001 USS Harry S. Truman relieved USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) in support of Operation Southern Watch (OSW) Entered the Arabian Gulf on Jan. 4.

January 27, CVN 75 pulled into Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a four-day liberty visit to Dubai Inport Jebel Ali again from March 3-7.

March 29, The eight Nimitz-class aircraft carrier anchored off Sitrah, Bahrain, for a two-day visit to Manama Inport Jebel Ali, U.A.E., from April 9-13.

April 27, USS Harry S. Truman transited the Strait of Hormuz southbound after relieved on station by USS Constellation (CV 64). The aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3 flew 869 sorties, totaling more than 2,700 flight hours, during 84 fly days in support of Operation Southern Watch. Throughout the deployment, the battle group also participated in numerous international exercises, including Arabian Gauntlet, an 11-nation exercise that involved more than 20 ships.

May 5, The Harry S. Truman arrived in Marmaris, Turkey, for a four-day port call Anchored off Rhodes, Greece, from May 9-12.

May 23, USS Harry S. Truman returned to Norfolk after a six-month deployment, travelling more than 44,000 nautical miles.

July 12, CVN 75 departed homeport for FRS/FS/TRACOM Carrier Qualifications in the VACAPES and Jacksonville OPAREA.

February 26, 2002 USS Harry S. Truman returned to Naval Station Norfolk after a four-day underway for sea trials, completing the six-month, $110 million worth, Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY). The work included installation of a nine air conditioning plant and alteration to each of HST's catapults.

March 4, The Truman departed homeport for FS/TRACOM Carrier Qualifications and NMPTT in the Virginia Capes Op. Area.

March 15, Capt. Michael R. Groothousen relieved Capt. David L. Logsdon as CO of the USS Harry S. Truman.

March 30, The Harry S. Truman returned to Naval Station Norfolk after a 10-day underway for MTT.

April 30, USS Harry S. Truman recently pulled into Port Everglades, Fla., to participate in Broward County Navy Days and Fleet Week Ft. Lauderdale celebrations.

May 15, The HST returned to homeport after a three-week underway for ammo onload, FRS/TRACOM CQ and MTT in the VACAPES and Jacksonville Op. Areas.

June 4, USS Harry S. Truman departed Norfolk for a two-week Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) I/II.

From June 20- July 1, the Truman was underway for MTT 3 and FRS/TRACOM Carrier Qualifications in the Jacksonville and Virginia Capes OPAREA Underway for Operational Reactor Safeguard Examination (ORSE) and FRS/TRACOM CQ from July 12-28.

August 23, USS Harry S. Truman departed Naval Station Norfolk for a TSTA III/FEP and Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX).

September 10, An S-3B Viking, assigned to Sea Control Squadron (VS) 22, crashed about 25 miles south-southeast of Puerto Rico at 21.30 local time. Lt. Cmdr. Jeffrey J. Gray, Lt. Cmdr. Michael D. Chalfant and Lt. j.g. Thomas B. McCombie were lost at sea.

September 27, The Harry S. Truman anchored off the coast of Key West, Fla., for a four-day port visit Returned home on Oct. ? Underway for Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) and ammo onload from Oct. 22- Nov. ?.

December 5, USS Harry S. Truman departed Norfolk for a scheduled Mediterranean deployment.

December 23, The Harry S. Truman arrived in Marseille, France, for four-day liberty port visit.

December 30, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier pulled into Souda Bay, Crete, Greece, for a New Year's holiday port visit.

January 31, 2003 The Harry S. Truman arrived in Koper, Slovenia, for a six-day port call.

March 20, Shortly after initial operations began, USS Harry S. Truman launched its first combat sorties in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom, from station in the eastern Mediterranean Sea.

During the 29 days of combat operations, aircraft from CVW-3 launched more than 2,000 sorties and dropped more than 700 tons of ordnance on targets in Iraq.

May 6, The Harry S. Truman anchored off the coast of Portsmouth, England, for a six-day port visit.

May 23, USS Harry S. Truman returned to Naval Station Norfolk after a five-and-a-half month combat deployment.

July 10, The eight Nimitz-class aircraft carrier departed homeport for ammo offload and FRS/TRACOM CQ.

August 20, USS Harry S. Truman entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Va., for a six-month Planned Incremental Availability (PIA).

February 13, 2004 CVN 75 departed NNSY for a three-day underway to conduct sea trials after completing PIA one week ahead of schedule and 4 million dollars under budget.

February 23, The Truman departed homeport for flight deck certification and FRS/TRACOM/CVW-8 CQ.

From April 6-29, the HST was underway for Tailored Ship's Training Availability I/II/III and Final Evaluation Period (FEP) Conducted INSURV inspection from May 17-21.

June 2, USS Harry S. Truman departed Norfolk for a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) and to participate in the Navy's Fleet Response Plan (FRP) Summer Pulse 2004, in the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterannean. The HST joined six other Carrier Strike Groups in a demonstration of the ability to sortie U.S. naval power.

June 27, An F/A-18C, assigned to Marine Strike Fighter Squadron (VMFA) 115, crashed approximately 60 miles south of the Azores, in the eastern Atlantic Ocean, while conducting a routine training exercise. Capt. Franklin R. Hooks II was killed.

July 2, CVN 75 anchored off the coast of Naples, Italy, for a four-day port call Participated in a multinational exercise Majestic Eagle, off the coast of Morocco, from July 11-16 Returned home on July 25.

July 29, Capt. James P. Gigliotti relieved Capt. Michael R. Groothousen as CO of the Harry S. Truman during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship at Norfolk.

From September 8-13, the Truman was underway for another round of CQ with Fleet Replacement Squadrons and CVW-8.

October 13, USS Harry S. Truman departed Naval Station Norfolk for its third major deployment, in support of the Global War on Terrorism.

From October 25-28, the Truman participated in the Joint Maritime Course, a miltinational NATO exercise, off the coast of Scotland.

October 31, USS Harry S. Truman CSG transited the Strait of Gibraltar and entered the Mediterannean Sea.

November 5, The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier pulled into Souda Bay, Greece, for a four-day port visit.

November 20, USS Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group relieved the USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67) CSG on station in the North Arabian Gulf. The two carriers conducted ordnance and crew transfers prior to Kennedy’s departure, and Truman’s commencement of combat operations in support of OIF.

December 13, The Harry S. Truman anchored off the coast of Sitrah, Bahrain, for a five-day liberty port visit to Manama.

January 4, 2005 USS Harry S. Truman pulled into Jebel Ali, U.A.E., for a four-day liberty visit to Dubai.

March 19, The Truman transferred its duty to USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) after almost four months on station in the Arabian Gulf. Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3 launched 2,577 sorties, totaling nearly 13,000 flight hours, in support of OIF and MSO Transited the Suez Canal northbound on March 26.

April 5, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier anchored in Stokes Bay for a five-day visit to Portsmouth, England.

April 18, USS Harry S. Truman returned to Norfolk after a six-month deployment.

June 22, CVN 75 recently departed homeport for FRS/TRACOM Carrier Qualifications (CQ).

July 19, USS Harry S. Truman and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3 completed sustainment training under the Navy's Fleet Response Training Plan (FRTP) during Commander, U.S. 2nd Fleet's Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX 05-2) for the USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) CSG.

July 29, The HST is currently underway for carrier qualifications and sustainment operations off the East Coast.

September 1, USS Harry S. Truman and USS Whidbey Island (LSD 41) are making preparations to get underway today for areas off the U.S. Gulf Coast in support of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) relief operations associated with Hurricane Katrina. They will join five other Norfolk-based ships that are already at sea and will remain on station for as long as necessary. The aircraft carrier will serve as the command center and afloat staging base, and will carry additional helicopters from Naval Air Station Jacksonville to support search and rescue (SAR) efforts.

September 17, The Harry S. Truman departed Gulf of Mexico and is currently conducting routine operations in the Atlantic Ocean Returned to Norfolk on Sept. 23 Underway for carrier qualifications and sustainment training with the CVW-3 on Oct. 12.

November 6, The Harry S. Truman returned to Naval Station Norfolk after a five-day underway for ammo offload with the USS Enterprise (CVN 65), USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) and USNS Arctic (T-AOE 8).

January 9, 2006 USS Harry S.Truman entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY) in Portsmouth, Va., for a 10-month Drydocking Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA). The carrier is expected to remain in dry-dock until August.

July 28, Capt. Herman A. Shelanski relieved Capt. James P. Gigliotti as CO of the Harry S. Truman during a change-of-command ceremony at the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) on Naval Air Station Oceana.

December 20, The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier departed Norfolk Naval Shipyard to conduct sea trials.

January 26, 2007 CVN 75 departed Naval Station Norfolk to conduct flight deck certifications Conducted ammo onload with the USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) and USNS Lewis and Clark (T-AKE 1) from Feb. 7-10.

March 20, The Harry S. Truman recently departed homeport for a Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA).

April 10, Capt. Michael Ullrich, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 10 Chief of Staff, made a major milestone with his 800th career arrested recovery on board the aircraft carrier.

May 16, USS Harry S. Truman is currently underway conducting carrier qualifications Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on June 2 Underway again for CQ on June 5.

July 2, The HST recently departed homeport for a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX), in preparation for the upcoming deployment.

July 20, USS Harry S. Truman arrived in Port Everglades, Fla., for a scheduled port visit prior to participating in Operation Bold Step (OBS). OBS will provide realistic training environments for U.S. and coalition forces that closely replicate the operational challenges routinely encountered during military operations around the world. More than 15,000 service members from three countries are scheduled to participate in the Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX).

August 15, The E-2C Hawkeye from VAW-120 "Greyhawks" crashed at approximately 11:00 p.m. following its launch from USS Harry S. Truman. The ship was approximately 150 miles southeast of the Virginia Capes conducting carrier qualifications. Three aviators were aboard the aircraft.

August 21, The search for Lt. Cameron N. Hall, Lt. Ryan K. Betton and Lt. j.g. Jerry R. Smith has been terminated and their status has now been listed as deceased.

September 18, The Truman is currently underway in the Atlantic Ocean conducting carrier qualifications.

November 5, USS Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group departed Norfolk for a scheduled Arabian Gulf deployment.

November 20, USS Harry S. Truman pulled into Naples, Italy, for a six-day port visit.

December 11, Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3 launched its first combat sorties in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom from the station in the Arabian Gulf.

December 23, USS Harry S. Truman and fast combat support ship USNS Arctic (T-AOE 8) rescued seven mariners adrift in a raft in the central Arabian Gulf. The mariners had been transporting cargo from Dubai when their dhow sailed into rough seas and broke its keel. When the vessel started taking on too much water to remain afloat, the mariners abandoned ship into a life raft where they remained for two days before the rescue.

December 28, USS Harry S. Truman departed Jebel Ali, U.A.E., after a four-day liberty port visit to Dubai.

January 7, 2008 Two "Super Hornets", F/A-18E and F/A-18F, crashed during operations in the Arabian Gulf. The three aviators are safely back aboard the aircraft carrier, and are reported in good condition following an ejection.

January 16, CVN 75 recovered its 75,000th aircraft without a single mishap on Jan. 14. Another milestone was made when Capt. Rick Pawlowski, commanding officer of CVW-3, logged his 6,000th hour of flight in an E2-C Hawkeye. The Truman is currently underway in the Arabian Gulf supporting combat operations in Iraq.

January 25, USS Harry S. Truman pulled into Jebel Ali, U.A.E., for a routine port call Inport Jebel Ali again from April 5-?.

April 19, Rear Adm. Mark Fox relieved Adm. Bill Gortney as Commander, Carrier Strike Group 10 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Truman, while underway in the Arabian Gulf.

May 7, The Harry S. Truman anchored off the coast of Rhodes, Greece, for a scheduled port visit.

June 4, USS Harry S. Truman returned to Naval Station Norfolk after a seven-month deployment. Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3 aircraft flew more than 26,500 hours during 9,500 sorties. Of these, 2,459 were combat sorties directly supporting coalition forces operating on the ground in Iraq. The Air Wing flew almost 14,000 combat hours and expended 77,500 pounds of ordnance during 228 troops-in-contact events.

June 20, Rear Adm. Michael R. Groothousen retired after more than 30 years of service in a ceremony aboard the Harry S. Truman, where he was commanding officer from March 2002 through July 2004.

August 6, The Truman departed Norfolk for a Friends and Family Day Cruise.

February 14, 2009 USS Harry S. Truman returned to homeport after a two-day underway for sea trials, following a nearly seven-month Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Va.

February 18, Capt. Joseph M. Clarkson relieved Capt. Herman A. Shelanski as CO of the Harry S. Truman during a change-of-command ceremony at Naval Station Norfolk.

March 11, The Truman is currently underway off the East Coast for carrier qualifications.

March 21, USS Harry S. Truman completed the onload of more than 1,800 tons of ammunition from USNS Robert E. Peary (T-AKE 5).

April 20, CVN 75 recently departed Norfolk for a Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Phase (FEP).

May 8, Rear Adm. Patrick Driscoll relieved Rear Adm. Mark I. Fox as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 10, during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Truman.

June 1, USS Harry S. Truman departed Naval Station Norfolk for a Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) assessment.

June 15, The Harry S. Truman is currently underway for a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) Underway for work-up evolutions in mid-July Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on July 18.

July 24, Admiral John C. Harvey, Jr., relieved Admiral Jonathan Greenert as Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Truman at Naval Station Norfolk.

August 5, The EA-18G Growlers, assigned to the "Vikings" of Airborne Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 129 and "Scorpions" of Airborne Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 132, landed on board the Truman for the first time. CVN 75 is currently conducting carrier qualifications off the coast of Virginia.

September 11, USS Harry S. Truman departed Norfolk for a Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) 09-4 in preparation for a deployment slated for early 2010.

November 5, The Harry S. Truman is currently underway for Carrier Qualifications (CQ) Underway again for CQ from Dec. 4-?.

January 20, 2010 USS Harry S. Truman departed homeport for CQ and a Sustainment Exercise (SUSTEX).

February 5, 2010 Capt. James Bynum relieved Capt. Andrew Lewis as Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3, during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Truman.

February 11, CVN 75 is currently underway in the Atlantic Ocean conducting carrier qualifications Underway for Group Sail operations on March 23 Underway for Independent Steaming Evolutions (ISE) on April 21.

May 21, USS Harry S. Truman CSG departed Naval Station Norfolk for a scheduled Middle East deployment.

June 8, The Harry S. Truman arrived in Port of Marseille, France, for a four-day liberty visit Conducted interoperability exercises with the Charles de Gaulle (R 91), from June 4-7.

June 13, USS Harry S. Truman anchored in the Bay of Hyeres to participate in the 100th anniversary celebration of French Naval Aviation Transited the Suez Canal on June 18.

June 29, Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3 launched its first combat sorties in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan.

July 3, Cmdr. Timothy M. Hill relieved Cmdr. Edward L. Heflin as CO of the "Swordsmen" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 32, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

July 9, USS Harry S. Truman and USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81) concluded the three-day air defense interoperability exercise with French destroyer FS Jean Bart (D615).

August 10, The Truman departed Jebel Ali, U.A.E., after a four-day liberty port visit to Dubai.

August 12, Cmdr. Robert Coughlin relieved Cmdr. Jeffrey L. Hammer as CO of the "Zappers" of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 130, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

August 21, Two SH-60F, assigned to Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 7, rescued eight Iranian mariners about 9:30 p.m. on Wednesday, after their vessel was set on fire, 50 miles away from the aircraft carrier, in the North Arabian Sea. After evaluated by medical staff and provided with clothing and food, aboard the Truman, they were transferred in a rigid-hull inflatable boat to the Iranian navy ship Chiroo on Friday.

September 10, CVN 75 recently pulled into Jebel Ali for another few days of rest and relaxation in United Arab Emirates.

September 25, Since arriving in the 5th Fleet AoR, aircraft assigned to CVW 3 completed more than 3,300 aircraft sorties and logged more than 10,200 flight hours, with more than 7,200 hours in support of coalition ground forces in Afghanistan.

November 1, USS Harry S. Truman departed Khalifa Bin Salman Port at Hidd after a four-day port visit to the Kingdom of Bahrain.

November 7, The flight deck of USS Harry S. Truman tallied it's 100,000th arrested landing.

November 9, Another milestone was reached when the Truman launched its 100,000th aircraft, assigned to the "Gunslingers" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 105.

December 1, USS Harry S. Truman transited Suez Canal after completed operations in the U.S. Central Command AoR. CVW-3 aircrews flew 2,915 missions into Afghanistan and Iraq and dropped 35,000 pounds of ordnance in support of OEF.

December 2, Cmdr. Rob Mathewson relieved Cmdr. Max Shuman as CO of the "Gunslingers" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 105, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

December 6, The Truman departed Souda Bay, Crete, Greece, after a three-day port call.

December 20, USS Harry S. Truman CSG returned to Norfolk after a seven-month deployment.

January 27, 2011 USS Harry S. Truman departed homeport for a Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS-CQ).

February 1, The Navy&rsquos newest airborne early-warning and control aircraft E-2D Advanced Hawkeye, assigned to Air Test Evaluation Squadron (VX) 20, made its first carrier takeoff aboard the Truman as part of a six-day suitability testing.

February 8, CVN 75 is currently underway conducting carrier qualifications for Naval Air Training Command (NATRACOM).

February 18, USS Harry S. Truman returned to Norfolk after completing an ammunition offload, Feb. 14-17, transferring more than 1,500 tons of ammunition to USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) and USNS Sacagawea (T-AKE 2).

February 25, Rear Adm. Ted N. Branch relieved Rear Adm. Richard J. O'Hanlon as Commander, Naval Air Forces Atlantic, during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Truman.

March 25, USS Harry S. Truman entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Va., for a 15-month Drydocking Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA).

June 18, NNSY marked a milestone with the removal of the Truman's 89,000 pound main mast.

August 5, Capt. Tushar R. Tembe relieved Capt. Joseph M. Clarkson as CO of the CVN 75 during a change-of-command ceremony at the Half Moon Cruise and Celebration Center in Norfolk.

August 20, NNSY marked a milestone with the installation of 112,000-pound main mast, two days ahead of schedule.

November 8, Capt. Tushar Tembe died suddenly at Norfolk Naval Shipyard after he collapsed while departing the ship at approximately 10 a.m. The ship's medical response team provided immediate medical assistance until Tembe could be transported to Bons Secours Maryview Medical Center where he was later pronounced dead. The cause of death has not been determined.

November 11, Capt. Dee L. Mewbourne assumed temporary command of the USS Harry S. Truman.

February 3, 2012 The eighth Nimitz-class aircraft carrier moved from Dry Dock #8 to Norfolk Naval Shipyard's Pier 6.

April 18, Operations Specialist Seaman Kevin Deshazo was found dead on Wednesday morning aboard the Harry S. Truman.

July 10, USS Harry S. Truman returned to Naval Station Norfolk after a three-day sea trials completing the DPIA.

July 16, CVN 75 departed Norfolk for an 11-day underway to conduct flight deck certification, CQ with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3 and CVW 8 and to conduct tests with an F/A-18D Hornet, assigned to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23, containing X-47B unmanned air vehicle (UAV) software as part of the Navy's Unmanned Combat Air System Carrier Demonstration (UCAS-D) program.

July 18, The first operational EA-18G Growler, assigned to the "Zappers" of Airborne Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 130 and piloted by CO Cmdr. Richard A. Vaccaro, landed on board the Truman.

July 19, The first MV-22 Osprey, assigned to the "Argonauts" of Marine Tiltrotor Operational Test and Evaluation Squadron (VMX) 22, landed on board the HST.

July 22, An MH-60S Sea Hawk, assigned to the "Dusty Dogs" of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 7, conducted a first landing on one of a two newly-added flight deck precision landing site that do not overlap the flight path for fixed-wing aircraft, adding enhanced flight operation capability to Truman&rsquos embarked helicopter and fixed-wing aircraft squadrons.

August 2, USS Harry S. Truman underway again for carrier qualifications with the Naval Air Training Command (NATRACOM) and ammunition onload with the USNS William McLean (T-AKE 12).

August 16, Capt. S. Robert Roth relieved Capt. Dee L. Mewbourne as CO of the Harry S. Truman during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship at Naval Station Norfolk.

August 17, Rear Adm. Kevin M. Sweeney relieved Rear Adm. Herman A. Shelanski as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 10, during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Truman.

September 4, The Truman departed Naval Station Norfolk for a week-long underway to conduct CVW-8/FRS/TRACOM Carrier Qualifications (CQ).

September 14, Adm. William E. Gortney relieved Adm. John C. Harvey, Jr., as Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the HST.

September 24, USS Harry S. Truman departed homeport for a four-day underway period to conduct Combat Systems Ship's Qualification Trials (CSSQT).

October 2, CVN 75 departed Norfolk for a 23-day underway period to conduct Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Problem (FEP), with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3, and Group Sail operations.

October 16, Four sailors were injured when line parted during a refueling at sea with the USNS Patuxent (T-AO 201), off the coast of Florida. Two were transferred to Naval Air Station Jacksonville, by an MH-60S "Knighthawk" assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 7, and one sailor was flown via C-2 Greyhound to Naval Station Norfolk for evaluation and possible further treatment.

November 1, USS Harry S. Truman departed Norfolk for an eight-day underway to conduct CQ with the Training Air Wing (TW) 1 and 2 in the Jacksonville Op. Area.

December 4, The Harry S. Truman departed Naval Station Norfolk for a two-week underway to conduct FRS/TRACOM Carrier Qualifications (CQ) and Underway Demonstration (UD) with the X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System (UCAS) demonstrator. CVN 75 is the first aircraft carrier in Naval aviation history to host test operations for an unmanned aircraft.

January 14, 2013 The HST CSG departed Norfolk for a 19-day underway to conduct Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX).

February 6, The U.S. Secretary of Defense, Leon E. Panetta, has delayed the deployment of the USS Harry S. Truman that was scheduled to depart on Feb. 8, for the U.S. Central Command AoR, after the Navy made this request due to "budget uncertainty."

From February 14-16, USS Harry S. Truman was underway for routine training in the VACAPES Op. Area Underway for CVW-3/TRACOM Carrier Qualifications (CQ) and testing with the MV-22 Osprey, assigned to VMX-22, from March 4-15 Underway for a Sustainment Exercise (SUSTEX) from April 15-26 Underway for Group Sail operations in the Jacksonville Op. Area from May 14-23 Underway again for SUSTEX with the CVW-3 and Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 10 from June 3-19.

July 22, USS Harry S. Truman departed Norfolk for a scheduled Middle East deployment Entered the Mediterranean Sea on Aug. 3.

August 5, CVN 75 moored at Berth 163, Leon Gourret Cruise Terminal in Marseille, France, for a four-day port visit Transited the Suez Canal on Aug. 18 Transited Bab el-Mandeb Strait on Aug. 21 Conducted turnover with the USS Nimitz (CVN 68) as Commander, Task Force (CTF) 50 on Aug. 26.

August 27, Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3 launched its first combat sorties in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan, from the station in the North Arabian Sea.

September 18, USS Harry S. Truman moored at Khalifa Bin Salman Port (KBSP) for a five-day port visit to the Kingdom of Bahrain.

October 25, The Harry S. Truman pulled into Jebel Ali, U.A.E., for a four-day port visit to Dubai Inport Jebel Ali again, in conjunction with Dubai Air Show 2013, from Nov. 16-20.

December 21, Cmdr. Matt L. Boren relieved Cmdr. James E. Miller as CO of the "Swamp Foxes" of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 74 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Truman in the Arabian Gulf .

December 22, Capt. George M. Wikoff relieved Capt. Sara A. Joyner as Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3, during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the CVN 75 at Khalifa Bin Salman Port. USS Harry S. Truman arrived today in Bahrain for a five-day port call Departed Arabian Gulf on Dec. 28.

December 29, 2013 The Harry S. Truman CSG, along with USS Carney (DDG 64) and USS Hopper (DDG 70), commenced combined operations with the French navy&rsquos Task Force 473 flagship FS Charles de Gaulle (R 91), FS Forbin (D 620), FS Jean de Vienne (D 643), in the Gulf of Oman.

January 9, 2014 Cmdr. Larry D. DeLong relieved Cmdr. Philip W. Walker as CO of the "Ragin' Bulls" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 37, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony in the North Arabian Sea USS Harry S. Truman transited the Strait of Hormuz northbound on Jan. 11.

January 16, An F/A-18F Super Hornet, assigned to "Swordsmen" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 32, recently landed at Sakhir Airbase to participate in the third Bahrain International Airshow (BIAS), from Jan. 16-18.

January 21, CVN 75 pulled into Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a four-day port call. Transited the Strait of Hormuz southbound on Jan. 26 Concluded combined operations with the French Navy Task Force, while underway in the North Arabian Sea on Feb. 2 Transited the Strait of Hormuz northbound on Feb. 22.

February 25, USS Harry S. Truman moored again at Khalifa Bin Salman Port in Hidd, Bahrain, for a five-day liberty visit to Manama Transited the Strait of Hormuz southbound on March 5.

March 17, Cmdr. Peter A. Hagge relieved Cmdr. Jeremy T. Andrew as CO of VFA-32 during an aerial change-of-command ceremony in the North Arabian Sea.

March 18, Cmdr. Przemyslaw J. Kaczynski relieved Cmdr. John W. Hewitt as CO the "Seahawks" of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 126, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

March 19, The Harry S. Truman launched its last combat sorties, more than 2,900 total, in support of OEF in Afghanistan. Conducted turnover and ammo onload with the USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) in the Gulf of Aden on March 22 Transited Bab el-Mandeb Strait northbound on March 24 Returned to Mediterranean on March 28.

April 3, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier anchored off the coast of Palma de Mallorca, Spain, for a four-day port visit Transited the Strait of Gibraltar on April 8.

April 18, USS Harry S. Truman returned to Naval Station Norfolk after a nine-month deployment.

May 28, CVN 75 departed homeport for a three-day underway to conduct Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) assessment. Underway for local operations from June 11-12 Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on June 27 Underway for TRACOM Carrier Qualifications (CQ) and ammo offload with the USNS William McLean (T-AKE 12) and USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) from July 8-21.

August 1, Rear Adm. Bruce H. Lindsey relieved Rear Adm. Kevin M. Sweeney as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 10, during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the HST.

August 20, USS Harry S. Truman departed Naval Station Norfolk for a nine-day underway in the Virginia Capes Op. Area Underway for FRS/CVW-3/TRACOM Carrier Qualifications (CQ) from Sept. 22- Oct. 3.

November 5, USS Harry S. Truman moored at the newly-constructed super Pier 5, Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Va., for a four-month Continuous Incremental Availability (CIA). Major tasks includes modernization of the propulsion plant, main engine and attached lube oil pump repairs as well as major inspections of the catapult launch system.

February 5, 2015 Capt. Ryan B. Scholl relieved Capt. S. Robert Roth as the 11th CO of CVN 75 during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship at Norfolk Naval Shipyard.

May 27, The Harry S. Truman moored at Pier 12 North, Naval Station Norfolk after a five-day underway for sea trials following an extended seven-month availability Underway for flight deck certification, carrier qualifications with the CVW-7 and ammo onload with the USNS William McLean from May 29- June 4.

June 29, Capt. Keith "Grumpy" Kimberly, Chief of Staff, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 8 completed his 1,000th arrested landing aboard the aircraft carrier with the trap of an F/A-18F Super Hornet, assigned to the "Jolly Rogers" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 103.

July 1, USS Harry S. Truman moored at Pier 14S on Naval Station Norfolk after a 23-day underway for Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Problem (FEP) with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7.

August 5, The HST departed homeport for a 10-day underway to conduct ammo onload and FRS-CQ, following a five-week Continuous Maintenance Availability (CMAV).

August 11, A fire erupted while an F/A-18C Hornet, assigned to the "Gladiators" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 106, was being refueled on the flight deck, late Tuesday night, while the Truman was underway off the coast of North Carolina. The pilot ejected safely and received medical treatment before being transported to New Hanover Regional Medical Center in Wilmington, N.C., along with one Sailor. The ship's firefighting team quickly put the fire out.

August 26, USS Harry S. Truman departed Naval Station Norfolk for a three-day underway in the Virginia Capes Op. Area Underway for a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) and Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) from Sept. 2- Oct. 1 Emergency sortied from Norfolk to avoid the approaching Hurricane Joaquin on Oct. 1 Returned home on Oct. 8.

November 16, USS Harry S. Truman departed Norfolk for a scheduled Middle East deployment.

November 29, The Harry S. Truman CSG-8 entered the Mediterranean Sea after transiting Strait of Gibraltar Participated in a Passing Exercise (PASSEX) with the FS Forbin (D620), while transiting the Strait of Sicily on Dec. 2 Entered the Adriatic Sea on Dec. 4.

December 5, USS Harry S. Truman anchored off the coast of Split, Croatia, for a four-day port visit, the first for U.S. nuclear-powered aircraft carrier after nine-and-a-half years.

December 14, The HST Carrier Strike Group (CSG) transited the Suez Canal Transited the Bab-el Mandeb Strait on Dec. 17 Transited the Strait of Hormuz on Dec. 26.

December 29, Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7 launched its first combat sorties in support of Operation Inherent Resolve.

January 6, 2016 USS Harry S. Truman moored at Berth 58/59, Quay 9 in Port of Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a four-day liberty visit to Dubai.

January 20, One F/A-18C Hornet and one F/A-18F Super Hornet, assigned to the Strike Fighter Squadrons (VFA) 83 and 103, recently landed at Sakhir Airbase to participate in Bahrain International Airshow (BIAS) 2016, from Jan. 21-23.

February 6, USS Harry S. Truman pulled into Jebel Ali, U.A.E., for a four-day liberty port visit to Dubai Inport Jebel Ali again from March 20-24.

March 27, Capt. John R. Bixby, deputy commander of CVW-7, completed his 1,000th arrested landing aboard the aircraft carrier with the trap of an F/A-18E Super Hornet, assigned to the "Pukin' Dogs" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 143.

April 17, USS Harry S. Truman moored at Berth 6, Khalifa Bin Salman Port (KBSP), Bahrain, for a four-day liberty visit to Manama Inport Jebel Ali, U.A.E., from May 15-19 Transited the Strait of Hormuz southbound on May 20 Transited the Bab-el Mandeb Strait northbound on May 28.

June 2, USS Harry S. Truman, along with the USS Anzio (CG 68), transited the Suez Canal northbound. While on station in the North Arabian Gulf (NAG), the CVW-7 launched 1820 combat sorties and expended more than 1,300,000 pounds of ordnance on Islamic State targets in Iraq and Syria.

June 7, Cmdr. Winston E. Scott, II relieved Cmdr. Chad A. Gerber as CO of the "Fist of the Fleet" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 25, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

From June 3-19, the Harry S. Truman launched 234 combat sorties and delivered 180 pieces of ordnance, in support of Operation Inherent Resolve (OIR), while underway in the eastern Mediterranean Sea.

June 21, USS Harry S. Truman moored at West Berth K14, NATO Fuel Depot in Souda Bay, Crete, Greece, for a four-day liberty port visit Transited the Strait of Gibraltar westbound on July 2.

July 13, USS Harry S. Truman moored at Pier 14N on Naval Station Norfolk following an extended eight-month deployment.

July 22, Rear Adm. Dale E. Horan relieved Rear Adm. Bret C. Batchelder as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 8 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Truman.

July 29, General Dynamics NASSCO-Norfolk was awarded a $23,4 million modification to a previously awarded contract (N00024-11-C-4303) for the USS Harry S Truman's Planned Incremental Availability (PIA). Work will be performed at Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY) in Portsmouth, Va., and is expected to be completed by May 2017.

August 15, The Harry S. Truman departed Norfolk for ammo offload with the USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) and USNS Robert E. Peary (T-AKE 5) Conducted ammo offload with the USNS Medgar Evers (T-AKE 13) on Aug. 17 Returned home on Aug. 18.

August 19, Huntington Ingalls Industries-Newport News Shipbuilding was awarded a $52,4 million contract for the USS Harry S. Truman's Planned Incremental Availability (PIA). Work will be performed at Norfolk Naval Shipyard by September 2017 and include repair or replacement of shipboard nuclear support and propulsion systems work within nuclear-controlled spaces and work on specialized systems.

August 21, USS Harry S. Truman departed Pier 14N, Naval Station Norfolk for a Friends and Family Day Cruise.

August 25, The HST moored at Super Pier 5, Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Virginia Commenced a Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) on Sept. 27.

July 25, 2017 USS Harry S. Truman moored at Pier 14S on Naval Station Norfolk after a four-day underway for sea trials.

July 28, Capt. Nicolas J. Dienna relieved Capt. Ryan B. Scholl as CO of the Harry S. Truman during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship.

August 31, The Harry S. Truman moored at Pier 14S on Naval Station Norfolk after an 11-day underway for flight deck certification and CQ with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1.

September 5, Rear Adm. Eugene H. Black, III relieved Rear Adm. Dale E. Horan as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 8 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Truman.

September 6, USS Harry S. Truman departed Naval Station Norfolk for a Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS-CQ) Conducted ammo onload with the USNS Robert E. Peary from Sept. 12-13 Conducted CQ with the Training Air Wing (TRAWING) 1 and 2 from Sept. 16-17 Moored at Pier 14S on Sept. 22.

November 4, CVN 75 moored at Pier 12N on Naval Station Norfolk after a 25-day underway for a Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Problem (FEP), with the CVW-1 Underway for FRS-CQ and Mid Cycle Material Assessment (MCMA) from Dec. 4-15.

March 1, 2018 The Harry S. Truman moored at Pier 14S on Naval Station Norfolk after a 28-day underway for a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) and Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX).

April 11, USS Harry S. Truman departed Norfolk for a scheduled deployment.

April 23, The Harry S. Truman, along with the USS Normandy (CG 60), USS Forrest Sherman (DDG 98) and RMNS Mohammed VI (FMMM 701), commenced exercise Lightning Handshake 2018, while underway in the Atlantic Ocean, off the coast of Morocco Transited the Strait of Gibraltar eastbound on April 27.

May 3, Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1 launched its first combat sorties in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, while the Truman was underway in the eastern Mediterranean Sea.

May 23, USS Harry S. Truman moored at West Berth K14, NATO Fuel Depot in Souda Bay, Greece, for a four-day liberty visit to Crete.

May 30, The Harry S. Truman transited the Strait of Otranto northbound in support of a multinational exercise Baltic Operations (BALTOPS) 2018 Transited southbound on June 7 Resumed combat sorties on June 10.

June 16, Cmdr. Brian C. Kesselring relieved Cmdr. Dan Catlin as CO of the "Sunliners" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 81, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

June 21, USS Harry S. Truman moored at Berth 163, Leon Gourret Cruise Terminal in Marseille, France, for a four-day liberty port visit.

June 26, Cmdr. Raul T. Acevedo relieved Cmdr. Daniel Paul M. Delacruz as CO of the "Fighting Checkmates" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 211, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

June 28, USS Harry S. Truman, along with the USS Forrest Sherman, USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG 81) and FGS Hessen (F 221), transited the Strait of Gibraltar westbound Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Arctic (T-AOE 8) on June 29.

From Juy 2-6, the Harry S. Truman conducted integrated flight operations with the Rafale M aircraft, as part of French Air Defense week, in the Bay of Biscay Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Arctic, in the Bay of Biscay, on July 11.

July 21, USS Harry S. Truman moored at Pier 14N on Naval Station Norfolk after more than a three-month deployment in the U.S. 6th Fleet AoR.

August 28, USS Harry S. Truman departed Norfolk for the second part of deployment following a five-week Continuous Maintenance Availability (CMAV).

August 30, The Harry S. Truman CSG-8 participated in a photo exercise (PHOTOEX) with the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) and USS Mason (DDG 87), as a "show of force" off the coast of Virginia Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Arctic, while underway in the Atlantic City Op. Area, on Sept. 5.

From September 10-12, the Harry S. Truman CSG participated in a joint naval drills with the HMCS Halifax (FFH 330) and HMCS Toronto (FFH 333), while underway off the coast of Nova Scotia.

September 18, USS Harry S. Truman, along with the USS Normandy and USS Forrest Sherman, arrived in the waters south of Iceland Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Big Horn (T-AO 198), while underway northwest of Ireland, on Sept. 25 Entered the North Sea on Sept. 29.

September 30, CVN 75 conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Robert E. Peary (T-AKE 5), while underway off the coast of Northumberland, England Transited the Dover Strait southbound on Oct. 5.

October 6, USS Harry S. Truman anchored at Anchorage "C" in Central Solent, 1 n.m. off the coast of Stokes Bay, Gosport, for a four-day port visit to Portsmouth, England Transited the Dover Strait northbound, just after midnight, on Oct. 11.

October 14, The Harry S. Truman conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Big Horn, while underway off the east coast of England.

October 19, USS Harry S. Truman arrived in the waters southwest of Bodo, Norway, becoming the first U.S. aircraft carrier to cross the Arctic Circle in 27 years Conducted operations in the Vestfjorden, off the coast of Bodo, Norway, from Oct. 21-24 Participated in NATO exercise Trident Juncture 2018, in the Norwegian Sea, from Oct. 25-31 Arrived off the west coast of Morocco, on Nov. 6.

November 10, The Harry S. Truman anchored off the coast of Lisbon, Portugal, for a four-day port visit in conjunction with the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I Transited the Strait of Gibraltar eastbound on Nov. 17.

November 26, USS Harry S. Truman conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Big Horn, while underway in the Ionian Sea Transited the Strait of Otranto northbound, just after midnight, on Nov. 27 Transited southbound, just after midnight, on Dec. 1 Transited the Strait of Gibraltar westbound on Dec. 4.

From December 5-6, the Harry S. Truman conducted ammo offload with the USNS Medgar Evers (T-AKE 13), while underway off the west coast of Morocco.

December 16, USS Harry S. Truman moored at Pier 14N on Naval Station Norfolk following a three-and-a-half month deployment in the U.S. 2nd and 6th Fleet AoR.

March 23, 2019 The Harry S. Truman returned to homeport after a week-long underway for routine training, following a three-month Continuous Maintenance Availability (CMAV).

March 31, Capt. Robert E. F. Gentry relieved Capt. John E. Perrone as Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the CVN 75, while underway off the coast of North Carolina.

April 11, The HST moored at Pier 14N on Naval Station Norfolk after a two-week underway, in the Cherry Point and Virginia Capes Op. Areas, for CVW-1/FRS CQ and a Sustainment Exercise (SUSTEX).

April 26, Rear Adm. Andrew J. Loiselle relieved Rear Adm. Eugene H. Black, III as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 8 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Truman.

May 6, USS Harry S. Truman moored at Pier 14S on Naval Station Norfolk after a four-day underway off the coast of Virginia Underway again from June 9-14.

July 24, Capt. Kavon Hakimzadeh relieved Capt. Nicolas J. Dienna as the 13th CO of Harry S. Truman during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship, while underway in the Jacksonville Op. Area.

August 5, The Harry S. Truman moored at Pier 14S on Naval Station Norfolk after a 31-day underway, for a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX), in the Cherry Point and Jacksonville Op. Areas Moved to Pier 11N on Sept. 4.

November 18, USS Harry S. Truman departed Norfolk for a Middle East deployment, two months later than scheduled, folowing emergent repairs to its electrical distribution system.

November 25, The Harry S. Truman conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Supply (T-AOE 6), while underway off the coast of North Carolina Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Joshua Humphreys (T-AO 188), while underway off the northwest coast of Morocco, on Dec. 4.

December 5, USS Harry S. Truman transited the Strait of Gibraltar eastbound, escorted by USS Normandy (CG 60) and USS Ross (DDG 71) Arrived off the east coast of Sicily on Dec. 9 Participated in a photo exercise (PHOTOEX) with the TCG Gaziantep (F490) and TCG Gediz (F495) on Dec. 11 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Supply, while underway in the eastern Mediterranean Sea, on Dec. 12 Transited the Suez Canal on Dec. 13.

December 17, USS Harry S. Truman transited the Bab el-Mandeb Strait southbound, escorted by USS Normandy and USS Forrest Sherman (DDG 98) Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Wally Schirra (T-AKE 8), while underway in the North Arabian Sea, on Dec. 21 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Supply on Dec. 27.

January 2, 2020 USS Harry S. Truman conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Amelia Earhart (T-AKE 6), while underway in the North Arabian Sea Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Supply on Jan. 5.

January 17, The Harry S. Truman moored at General Cargo Terminal in Port of Duqm, Oman, for a four-day liberty visit Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Supply on Jan. 25, Feb. 2 and Feb. 8.

February 13, Capt. James R. Kenny relieved Capt. Jennifer S. Couture as Commander, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 28 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Truman.

February 14, USS Harry S. Truman conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Supply, while underway in the North Arabian Sea Conducted a replenishment-at-sea again on Feb. 21 Inport Duqm, Oman, again from Feb. 26- March 1 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Supply on March 6 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS William McLean (T-AKE 12) on March 13.

March 18, USS Harry S. Truman participated in a PHOTOEX with the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), as a "show of force" while underway in the North Arabian Sea Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Supply on March 20 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Robert E. Peary (T-AKE 5), while underway in the Gulf of Aden, on March 28.

March 29, USS Harry S. Truman CSG transited the Bab el-Mandeb Strait northbound Transited the Suez Canal on April 2 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Patuxent (T-AO 201) on April 6 Transited the Strait of Gibraltar westbound on April 7 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Patuxent again on April 11.

April 15, The Harry S. Truman conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Medgar Evers (T-AKE 13), while underway off the coast of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina Conducted a replenishment-at-sea again, while underway in the Virginia Capes Op. Area, on April 19 and 25th.

May 2, CVN 75 CSG conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Patuxent and USNS Medgar Evers, while underway approximately 100 n.m. off the coast of Kitty Hawk Conducted a replenishment-at-sea again, while underway south of Cape Hatteras, N.C., on May 8 Arrived in the Jacksonville Op. Area on May 9.

May 11, The Harry S. Truman conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Patuxent Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Medgar Evers on May 14 and 15th Conducted operations approximately 10 n.m. off the coast of Currituck Banks Peninsula, N.C., on May 17.

May 20, The HST conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Medgar Evers, while underway off the coast of North Carolina Arrived in the Atlantic City Op. Area on May 21 Arrived off the coast of Nova Scotia on May 26 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Medgar Evers on May 27.

May 31, USS Harry S. Truman participated in a PHOTOEX with the USS Normandy (CG 60), USS Montpelier (SSN 765) and HMCS Ville de Quebec (FFH 332), at the conclusion of U.S. Northern Command-led exercise Vigilant Osprey.

June 1, Rear Adm. Ryan B. Scholl relieved Rear Adm. Andrew J. Loiselle as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 8 during a brief ceremony aboard the Truman.

June 3, The Harry S. Truman conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Medgar Evers Participated in a PHOTOEX with the USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78), while underway east of Cape Hatteras, N.C., on June 4 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Patuxent, while underway off the coast of Virginia, on June 11.?

June 16, USS Harry S. Truman moored at Pier 14N on Naval Station Norfolk following a seven-month deployment, that was extended for two months to protect the crew from the risks posed by COVID-19 global pandemic.

July 7, The Harry S. Truman moved from Naval Station Norfolk to Super Pier 5 on Norfolk Naval Shipyard for a six-month Extended Continuous Incremental Availability (ECIA).

May 21, 2021 USS Harry S. Truman moored at Pier 14S on Naval Station Norfolk after a nine-day underway for sea trials, flight deck certification and CQ with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1 Underway for FRS-CQ on May 22.

From May 27-28, the Harry S. Truman conducted ammo onload with the USNS Medgar Evers, while underway in the Virginia Capes Op. Area Returned home on May 30 Underway for Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Problem (FEP) on June 7.


USS Hornet prior to commissioning - History

SHOP FOR NAVY AIRCRAFT CARRIER APPAREL & GIFTS:

The modern Nimitz-class (CVN-68) aircraft carrier is like a small city with a medium-sized airport on the roof. The combat power carried by the carrier, its air wing, and the other ships in a U.S. aircraft carrier battle group (CVBG) provides the President, in the words of writer Tom Clancy, "presence, influence, and options." The advantage of this power was put more plainly in the words of Senator John C. Stennis, (namesake of the USS John C. Stennis, CVN-74) "there is nothing that compares with it when it comes to deterrence." With nuclear propulsion, jet aircraft that can fly faster than the speed of sound, and weapons that can strike an enemy we can't see with the naked eye, it's hard to believe that the first aircraft took off from a ship less than one hundred years ago.

When the Wright brothers made their first powered flight at Kitty Hawk on December 17, 1903, the United States, like most other world powers, was focused on a battleship navy. In fact, with the launching of the British warship HMS Dreadnought in 1906, a new arms race began, with the super powers of the day competing to be the first country to take the next step in armament, armor, and propulsion. Yet, forward thinking individuals saw the airplane as a potential weapon against these armored behemoths. In 1908, aviation pioneer Glenn Curtis laid out a target in the shape of a battleship and proceeded to simulate bombing it. The United States Navy took notice, and when they heard that Germany was attempting to fly aircraft off the deck of a ship, they wanted to try it too.

On November 4, 1910, Eugene Ely, an exhibition pilot who worked for Glenn Curtiss, took off from a wooden platform built over the main deck of the light cruiser Birmingham (CL-2). Ely's plane, a Curtis Pusher, skipped the water once, but the pilot maintained control and landed safely on shore in Norfolk, Virginia. Two months later, Ely landed on a platform built on the quarterdeck of the armored cruiser Pennsylvania (ACR-4) in San Francisco Bay. He had installed hooks on the undercarriage of his aircraft that grabbed several of the twenty-two transverse cables strung over the platform and held by sandbags on either end. Later that year, Ely was asked how long he planned to keep flying. Ely replied, "Oh, I'll do like the rest of them, keep it up until I'm killed." Two weeks later, at the age of 25, Eugene Ely became the 101st pilot to die in an airplane crash, though not while working for the Navy.

In December 1910, the month prior to Ely's "first carrier landing," Glenn Curtiss offered at his own expense "to instruct an officer of the US Navy in the operation and construction of a Curtiss aeroplane." Lieutenant T.G. Ellyson reported to North Island, San Diego, California on December 23, 1910 for training with Curtiss. Four months later Ellyson "graduated flight school" when Curtiss wrote to the Secretary of the Navy that "Lt. Ellyson is now competent to care for and operate Curtiss aeroplanes." In less than eight years since the first powered flight by the Wright brothers, the Navy had demonstrated that it could have an aircraft take off from, and land to, a ship. Although the U.S. Navy would not establish its flying corps until 1916, it had already begun to see the importance that aviation would play in the future.

World War I developed aviation as a war fighting branch. The war saw the development of mounted guns and the dropping of bombs on enemy targets. However, the American navy used primarily land-based aircraft and a few seaplanes to provide adjustment for naval gunfire and patrolling for submarines. The British took the lead in developing carrier-borne operations during the First World War. By 1914, they had converted the bulk carrier Ark Royal and the light cruiser Furious into aircraft carriers. The U.S. Navy would take the British example and improve upon it. The USS Jupiter (AC-3), a collier or bulk cargo ship for carrying coal, was converted into the USS Langley (CV-1). The Langley was America's first aircraft carrier, launched on March 20, 1920.

The Langley was converted at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard in San Francisco Bay and named for Samuel Pierpont Langley, an American aviation pioneer. Langley could operate with 26 aircraft, which was a space design accomplishment considering the size of her hull. She was nicknamed the "covered wagon" by her crew, and over the next two decades the Langley trained the first generation of navy carrier pilots. She was converted to a seaplane tender (AV-3) in 1937 and the outbreak of World War II found the Langley in the Philippines. On February 27, 1942, the Langley was caught by a Japanese air attack near Java while ferrying aircraft from Australia. The ship was so badly damaged that later she had to be scuttled by her crew.

While the Langley had always been a test and training ship, what the Navy learned from her immediately went into the next generation of carriers, the Lexington-class. Following WWI, the five remaining major naval powers (Great Britain, the United States, Italy, France, and Japan) entered into the world's first arms limitation treaty, the Washington Naval Treaty, in 1922. One aspect of the treaty was to limit the size of future battleships and heavy cruisers. The United States had already laid the keel on two heavy cruisers, the Lexington and the Saratoga, which now could not be finished due to the limits set by the Washington Naval Treaty. Therefore to take advantage of the work already funded, the projects were converted over to carrier designs. The Lexington (CV-2), called the "Gray Lady" or "Lady Lex," was launched on October 3, 1925 and commissioned on December 14, 1927. The Saratoga (CV-3) was nicknamed "Sister Sara" or "Stripe-Stacked Sara" for the vertical stripe painted on her funnel so pilot's could tell her from her sister ship. Saratoga was launched on April 7, 1925 and commissioned November 16, 1927.

At the time of their launching, the Lexington class aircraft carriers were the largest and fastest naval ships in the world. They could operate up to ninety aircraft, which was twice the number of any British or Japanese carrier afloat. Lexington and Saratoga made the United States Navy the world leader in naval aviation and during the interwar years trained the generation of officers that would win the great naval battles of WWII. The Lexington was sunk during the Battle of the Coral Sea on May 7, 1942. Saratoga survived the war, including the Battle of Midway, Guadalcanal, Iwo Jima and other campaigns, earning seven battle stars for her WWII service. But at war's end technology had left Saratoga behind and she was considered a surplus ship. Saratoga was sunk as part of a nuclear test on Bikini Atoll. She is now a destination for recreational divers.

The USS Ranger (CV-4) was the first American aircraft carrier to be built as a carrier from the keel up. The Ranger was the only one its class and smaller than the Lexington-class carriers, but still normally operated with 76 aircraft. Ranger was laid down on September 26, 1931 in Newport News, Virginia, launched on February 25, 1933, and commissioned on June 4, 1934. The Ranger is only one of three American aircraft carriers (along with Saratoga and Enterprise) built before WWII that served and survived the entire war. The USS Ranger spent most of her time in the Atlantic, but trained pilots in night flying in the Pacific at the end of the war. Ranger was sold for scrap and struck from the register on October 19, 1946.

With war on the horizon, the navy took what they had learned from the Lexington-class carriers and the Ranger and developed the Yorktown-class. The USS Yorktown (CV-5) was launched on April 4, 1936 and commissioned September 30, 1937. The Yorktown was fast at 32 knots cruising, but also carried a complement of 80 aircraft, making it almost as effective a launching platform as the Lexington-class. Two other ships are in the class, the USS Enterprise (CV-6) was commission on May 12, 1938 and the USS Hornet (CV-8) was commissioned on October 20, 1941. A scaled down version of class, the USS Wasp (CV-7) was built (commissioned in 1939) to use up the allowable tonnage remaining under the Washington Naval Treaty. Due to its size the Wasp is considered to be a one-ship class. The USS Wasp was sunk during the Guadalcanal Campaign on September 15, 1942. Only one of the three Yorktown-class ships survived the war. The Yorktown was sunk at the Battle of Midway on June 5, 1942. The Hornet was lost at the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands on October 26, 1942. The USS Enterprise (CV-6), known as the "Big E" or "the Grey Ghost," survived the war, having participated in more major actions (20 battle stars) than any other US ship. Enterprise is probably most famous for launching the sixteen B-25 bombers of the "Doolittle Raid" on Tokyo. CV-6 was scrapped in 1958, but the navy would later honor her name with a new ship.

With the opening salvos of World War II, the United States rushed to lay down the next generation of aircraft carriers. The Essex-class carrier was the most numerous class of carriers with 26 ships being built in both a "short-hull" and "long-hull" version. The long-hull version allowed enough deck space to mount two quadruple 40mm gun mounts. The Essex carried between 90 and 100 aircraft and steamed at 33 knots. The design of the Essex class allowed for modifications and systems upgrades and hence a few of these carriers lasted until the 1970s. The USS Essex (CV-9) was the fourth ship to bear the name, was commissioned July 31, 1942. Essex served in the Pacific during WWII and was awarded 13 battle stars and a Presidential Unit Citation. Decommissioned after the war, she was brought back as an attack carrier (CVA-9) during the Korean War era earning 4 battle stars and Navy Unit Commendation. The Essex eventually was made into an antisubmarine aircraft carrier (CVS-9) and was the primary recovery ship for the Apollo 7 space mission. Essex was finally decommissioned in 1969.

The Essex had nine sister ships in the short-hull version. The USS Yorktown (CV-10) was commissioned in 1943, decommissioned in 1970, and is now preserved at the Patriot's Point Naval and Maritime Museum in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina. USS Intrepid (CV-11), also commissioned in 1943, was decommissioned in 1974 and is preserved at the Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum in New York. USS Hornet (CV-12) also began service in 1943, was decommissioned in 1970 and now is preserved at the USS Hornet Museum in Alameda, California. The USS Franklin (CV-13) served from 1944 until 1947 and was scrapped in 1966. The USS Lexington (CV-16) was commissioned in 1943 and was not decommissioned until 1991. Lexington is now preserved at the USS Lexington Museum On the Bay in Corpus Christi, Texas. USS Bunker Hill (CV-17) began service in 1943 and was scrapped in 1973. The USS Wasp (CV-18) served from 1943 and was scrapped in 1973. The USS Bennington (CV-20) was commissioned in 1944, was decommissioned in 1970, and was scrapped in 1994. The USS Bon Homme Richard (CV-31) was the last of the short-hull Essex-class carriers. She was commissioned in 1944, decommissioned in 1971, and scrapped in 1992.

The sixteen long hull Essex-class carriers began with the commissioning of the USS Ticonderoga (CV-14) in 1944. Ticonderoga was decommissioned in 1973 and scrapped in 1975. USS Randolph (CV-15) served from 1944 until 1969 and was scrapped in 1975. USS Hancock (CV-19) was also commissioned in 1944, served until January 1976, and was scrapped that same year. The USS Boxer (CV-21) began service in 1945, was converted to an amphibious assault ship in 1959, before being decommissioned in 1969 and scrapped in 1971. The USS Leyte (CV-32) served from 1942 until 1959 and was scrapped in 1970. USS Kearsarge (CV-33) was commissioned in 1946, decommissioned in 1970, and was scrapped in 1974. The USS Oriskany (CV-34) served from 1950 until September 1976. Oriskany was scuttled in the Gulf of Mexico in 2006 to create an artificial reef. USS Reprisal (CV-35) was cancelled while under construction in 1945. The partially complete hulk was launched in 1946 and used for explosives tests before being scrapped in 1949. USS Antietam (CV-36) served from 1945 until 1963 and was scrapped in 1974. The USS Princeton (CV-37), also commissioned in 1945, served as an amphibious assault ship from 1959 until decommissioned in 1970, and then scrapped in 1971. The USS Shangri-la (CV-38) served from 1944 until 1971 and was scrapped in 1988. The USS Lake Champlain (CV-39) was commissioned in 1945, decommissioned in 1966, and scrapped in 1972. USS Tarawa (CV-40) was commissioned in 1945, decommissioned in 1960, and sold for scrap in 1968. The USS Valley Forge (CV-45) served from 1946 until January 1970 and was scrapped in 1971. USS Philippine Sea (CV-47) was the last Essex-class carrier to see service. Commissioned in 1946, Philippine Sea was decommissioned in 1958 and scrapped in 1971. The USS Iwo Jima (CV-46) was cancelled during construction in 1945 and scrapped in 1946. Six other long hull Essex-class carriers (CV-50 through CV-55) were cancelled before being named.

In August of 1941, with the direct interest of President Roosevelt, the Navy chose to convert nine cruiser hulls that had been already laid into light aircraft carriers. This was a stop gap measure to fill the time required to build the first Essex-class carriers. The result was the Independence-class of light aircraft carriers. Beginning with the USS Independence (CVL-22), commissioned in January 1943, this class of aircraft carriers typically carried 24 F6F Hellcat fighters and 9 TBM Avenger torpedo planes. The Independence-class carriers were limited capability ships, but served well during the war. Eight of the ships participated in the June 1944 Battle of the Philippine Sea, supplying 40 percent of the American fighters and 36 percent of the torpedo bombers that saw action during the battle. The Independence-class did not see long service after the war like their larger sisters in the Essex-class. The USS Independence was used as a nuclear test target in 1946 and finally scuttled in January 1951. The USS Princeton (CVL-23) was sunk on October 24, 1944 as a result of damage sustained in the Battle of Leyte Gulf. USS Belleau Wood (CVL-24) was transferred to France to serve that country from 1953 to 1960, and then was returned to the United States to be scrapped. The USS Cowpens (CVL-25) was decommissioned in 1947 and scrapped in 1960. The USS Monterey (CVL-26) was decommissioned in 1956 and scrapped in 1971. USS Langley (CVL-27) began service like her sister ships in 1943, and then served the French Navy from 1951 to 1963 before being returned to the United States to be scrapped in 1964. The USS Cabot (CVL-28) was transferred to Spain to serve from 1967 until 1989. Cabot was returned to the United States to be scrapped in 2002. The USS Bataan (CVL-29) was decommissioned in 1954 and scrapped in 1961. The USS San Jacinto (CVL-30) served this country from 1943 until 1947 and was scrapped in 1972.

During the war, American industry also produced nearly one hundred other purpose carriers, not given the numerical designation of the "fleet carriers." These smaller ships, designated "escort carriers" (CVE) fulfilled a variety of other duties such as antisubmarine warfare, close air support, amphibious support, and aircraft transportation. These workhorses left the fleet carriers free to face the Japanese navy in the major "carrier battles" of the war.

Planned and built during WWII, the Midway-class carriers were commissioned too late to serve in the war. This class of aircraft carrier would see a long life of service to the United States and was the last carrier class of the World War II era that took us through the Cold War era, before the construction of the "Super Carriers." The Midway-class of carrier featured armored deck protection therefore it was a big ship to support the weight. USS Midway (CVB-41), commissioned on September 11, 1945, was the first navy ship built so large that it could not fit through the Panama Canal. The Midway served several deployments to Vietnam and also participated in Operation Desert Storm. She was decommissioned in 1992 and is preserved at the USS Midway Museum in San Diego, California. Midway's sister ships in the class are USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVB-42) and USS Coral Sea (CVB-43). Franklin D. Roosevelt, known by her crew as "Swanky Franky" or just "Rosie," spent most of her career in the Mediterranean as part of the United States Sixth Fleet. The Roosevelt was decommissioned in 1977 and scrapped the following year. Coral Sea served from 1947 until 1990 and also deployed to the Vietnam War. Coral Sea was present for the fall of Saigon and responded to the Mayaguez Incident. She had the nickname "Ageless Warrior" for her long service, but unfortunately was scrapped in the year 2000. Three other Midway-class carriers were planned (CVB-44, CVB-56, and CVB-57), but were cancelled in the post WWII drawdown of forces.

Like the Independence-class, two light aircraft carriers came out of this "end of war" period. The Saipan-class of light carriers consisted of two ships: the USS Saipan (CVL-48) and the USS Wright (CVL-49). They were based on light cruiser hulls, but unlike the Independence-class, the Saipan-class were built from the keel up as a carrier. The Saipan and the Wright were commissioned in 1946 and 1947, respectively, and were later converted to command and communications ships in the 1950s. Both ships were scrapped in 1980.

In the years between World War II and the Korean War, defense dollars were tight. A debate raged among American military leaders on whether the best way to defend the United States was to put the majority of our efforts into long range bombers that could strike with nuclear weapons anywhere in the world, or build naval task forces around a new class of "super carrier" operating with aircraft capable of carrying tactical nuclear weapons if the need arose. This of course caused a not-always-so-friendly rivalry between the Air Force and the Navy for precious funding. While this debate was raging, both services strove to modernize their branch of service. On July 29, 1948, President Truman authorized the construction of five new ships in a class of supercarriers, based on the Naval Appropriations act of 1949. The keel of the first of these ships, the USS United States (CVA-58) was laid down on April 18, 1949 at Newport News Drydock and Shipbuilding in Virginia. The ship was designed to conduct nuclear war against the Soviet Union. It would carry 18-24 nuclear capable bombers and 54 fighter escort aircraft. The cost of the United States alone was estimated to be $190 million.

With limited funds and fierce opposition by both the Air Force and Army leadership, Secretary of Defense Louis Johnson cancelled the construction of the USS United States on April 23, 1949, just five days after it was started. The funding priority would go to the Air Force and their new project, the B-36 Peacemaker intercontinental bomber. The Navy was livid. Secretary of the Navy John Sullivan immediately resigned. In the months following the decision to cancel the United States, there was a "revolt of the Admirals" where many of the Navy's leadership spoke out publically, many at the cost of their careers. However, the outspoken Admirals did help to bring about congressional hearings into the matters. Subsequent investigations and studies, as well as the protracted, non-nuclear, and limited Korean War, helped to save the United States Navy. In the early 1950s, funds were increased to help modernize existing carriers and plan for future supercarrier projects.

The Forrestal-class was the first supercarriers to see service with the United States Navy. The ships are called "supercarriers" because of the tonnage and the name has been applied to every aircraft carrier since. For example, the USS Forrestal (CV-59) at over 81,000 tons fully loaded is 25% larger than the USS Midway. Although the size and weight of a supercarrier is extraordinary, the Forrestal has a speed of 34 knots and carries a compliment of 90 aircraft. Forrestal was commissioned on October 1, 1955 and served until September 1993. Other ships in the class are the USS Saratoga (CV-60), USS Ranger (CV-61), and USS Independence (CV-62). USS Saratoga was active from 1956 until 1994. USS Ranger served from 1957 until July 1993 and USS Independence was in service from 1959 until September 1998. All four Forrestal-class carriers are waiting disposal.

The Kitty Hawk class of supercarriers brought an incremental improvement over the Forrestal-class. The Kitty Hawk-class has a greater length of a few feet on average, and movement of the elevators to facilitate aircraft movement. Three carriers are in this class. The USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) was commissioned in 1961 and was decommissioned in May 2009. Kitty Hawk is being held in reserve status in Bremerton, Washington until 2015. The USS Constellation (CV-64) served from 1961 until 2003 and is awaiting disposal in Bremerton. The USS America (CV-66) was commissioned in 1965 and was decommissioned in 1996. The America was scuttled in 2005 as part of a live-fire test. There was to be a fourth Kitty Hawk-class supercarrier, the USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67). However, originally planned as a nuclear ship, then built with conventional propulsion, there was enough design changes that the USS John F. Kennedy is considered to be the only ship in the Kennedy-class. The Kennedy served from 1968 until 2007, and is now on donation hold in Philadelphia.

The USS Enterprise (CVN-65) is the United States Navy's first nuclear powered supercarrier and the only ship in the Enterprise-class. Commissioned on November 25, 1961 and still serving, Enterprise is the oldest active US Navy ship, after the wooden frigate USS Constitution. At the time of her launching, the "Big E" was also the heaviest navy ship at 93,284 tons, and the longest carrier at a length of 1,123 feet. Enterprise has an eight reactor propulsion design, where other nuclear carriers only have two. Enterprise's first deployment in 1962 was to serve as a tracking station for the Project Mercury space capsule that took John Glenn on the first orbit of earth. Only eight months later the Big E was dispatched to serve as part of the naval blockade during the Cuban Missile Crisis. The Enterprise has served multiple deployments to Vietnam and hot spots around the globe since. Enterprise launched air strikes against Al Qaeda training camps in Afghanistan in October 2001, making it the first response to the 9/11 attacks. She has had multiple deployments during the Global War on Terror. Enterprise is scheduled for retirement in 2013, which will make 51 years of continuous service to the country, more than any other U.S. aircraft carrier.

Along with the USS Enterprise, the modern American carrier force is made up of the ten ships in the nuclear-powered Nimitz-class. Beginning with the USS Nimitz (CVN-68), nicknamed the "Old Salt" and commissioned in 1975, these supercarriers are the largest afloat at over 100,000 tons. The Nimitz-class is about thirty feet shorter than the Enterprise, but can maintain over 30 knots of speed for unlimited range on two nuclear reactors that drive four propeller shafts. They operate a naval air wing of up to 90 aircraft, mostly F/A-18 Hornets. All ten carriers were built by Newport News Shipbuilding Company in Virginia. As of 2010, the Nimitz' home port is at Everett, Washington. The USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69), the "Mighty Ike," was commissioned in October 1977 and calls NS Norfolk, Virginia home. The USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) was commissioned in March 1982 and is home ported in San Diego, California. The Carl Vinson's callsign is "Gold Eagle," but her crew has a lot of other names for her like "Cell Block 70" and the "Carl Prison." But other nicknames show the sailor's pride, like "America's Favorite Carrier" and the "Chuckie V." On November 11th of 2011 (11-11-11), the Carl Vinson played host to the first NCAA basketball game on an aircraft carrier between the University of North Carolina and Michigan State University.


Service history

World War II: 1944 to 1947

The Hornet conducted shakedown training off Bermuda before departing Norfolk on 14 February 1944 to join the Fast Carrier Task Force on 20 March at Majuro Atoll in the Marshall Islands. After lending air support to protect the invasion beaches in New Guinea, she conducted massive aerial raids against Japanese bases in the Caroline Islands and prepared to support the amphibious assault for the occupation of the Marianas Islands.


On 11 June, Hornet launched raids on Tinian and Saipan. The following day she conducted heavy bombing attacks on Guam and Rota. On 15–16 June, she blasted enemy air fields at Iwo and Chichi Jima to prevent air attacks on troops invading Saipan in the Marianas. The afternoon of 18 June, Hornet formed with the Fast Carrier Task Force to intercept the Japanese First Mobile Fleet, headed through the Philippine Sea for Saipan. The Battle of the Philippine Sea began on 19 June, when Hornet launched strikes to destroy as many land-based Japanese planes as possible before the carrier-based Japanese aircraft came in effectively.


The enemy approached the American carriers in four massive waves, full of young and inexperienced pilots. Fighter aircraft from Hornet and other U.S. carriers, whose veteran pilots' skills were honed to perfection, broke up and savaged all the attacks before the Japanese aerial raiders reached the task force. Nearly every Japanese aircraft was shot down in the great air battles of 19 June that became commonly known as "The Marianas Turkey Shoot". As the Japanese Mobile Fleet fled in defeat on 20 June, the carriers launched long-range airstrikes that sank Template:Ship and so damaged two tankers that they were abandoned and scuttled. Vice Admiral Jisaburō Ozawa's own flag log for 20 June 1944 showed his surviving carrier air power as only 35 operational aircraft out of the 430 planes with which he had commenced the Battle of the Philippine Sea.


Hornet, based at Eniwetok in the Marshalls, raided enemy installations ranging from Guam to the Bonins, then turned her attention to the Palaus, throughout the Philippine Sea, and to enemy bases on Okinawa and Formosa. Her aircraft gave direct support to the troops invading Leyte on 20 October 1944. During the Battle for Leyte Gulf she launched damaging raids on the Japanese center force in the Battle off Samar, and hastened the retreat of the enemy fleet through the Sibuyan Sea towards Borneo.


In the following months, Hornet attacked enemy shipping and airfields throughout the Philippines. This included participation in a raid that destroyed an entire Japanese convoy in Ormoc Bay. On 30 December, she departed Ulithi in the Carolines for raids against Formosa, Indo-China, and the Pescadores Islands. En route back to Ulithi, HornetTemplate:'s planes conducted photo reconnaissance of Okinawa on 22 January 1945 to aid the planned invasion of that "last stepping-stone to Japan".

40 mm guns firing aboard Hornet on 16 February 1945, as the carrier's planes were raiding Tokyo.


Hornet again departed Ulithi on 10 February for full-scale aerial assaults on Tokyo, then supported the amphibious landing assault on Iwo Jima on 19–20 February.


Repeated raids were made against the Tokyo plains industrial complex, and Okinawa was hard hit. On 1 April, Hornet planes gave direct support to the amphibious assault landings on Okinawa. On 6 April, her aircraft joined in attacks which sank the mighty Template:Ship and her task force as it closed on Okinawa. The following two months found Hornet alternating between close support to ground troops on Okinawa and hard-hitting raids to destroy the industrial capacity of Japan. She was caught in a howling typhoon 4–5 June which collapsed some 25 ft (8 m) of her forward flight deck.


For 16 continuous months, she was in action in the forward areas of the Pacific combat zone, sometimes within Template:Convert of the Japanese home islands. Under air attack 59 times, she was never hit. Her aircraft destroyed 1,410 Japanese aircraft only Template:USS exceeded this record. 10 of her pilots attained "Ace in a Day" status 30 of her 42 VF-2 F6F Hellcat pilots were aces. In one day, her aircraft shot down 72 enemy aircraft, and in one month, they shot down 255 aircraft. Hornet supported nearly every Pacific amphibious landing after March 1944. Her air groups destroyed or damaged 1,269,710 tons (1,151,860 tonnes) of enemy shipping, and scored the critical first hits in sinking Yamato.


Hornet earned nine battle stars for her service in World War II. Seven battle stars were earned as the sole receiver in 1944. Two were earned together as Hornet and her air groups when the Navy changed their nomenclature in 1945. She was one of nine carriers to be awarded the Presidential Unit Citation.


Following a typhoon that collapsed the forward edge of her flight deck, Hornet was routed back to the Philippines and from there to San Francisco, arriving on 7 July. Her overhaul was complete by 13 September when she departed as a part of Operation Magic Carpet that saw her return home troops from the Marianas and Hawaiian Islands. She returned to San Francisco on 9 February 1946. She decommissioned there on 15 January 1947, and joined the Pacific Reserve Fleet.

Peacetime tensions: 1951 to 1959

CIC (Combat Information Center) in dim light.


Hornet recommissioned on 20 March 1951, then sailed from San Francisco for the New York Naval Shipyard where she decommissioned on 12 May for conversion to an attack aircraft carrier CVA-12. On 11 September 1953, she was recommissioned as an attack carrier. The ship then trained in the Caribbean Sea before departure from Norfolk on 11 May 1954 on an eight-month global cruise.


After operations in the Mediterranean Sea and the Indian Ocean, Hornet joined the mobile 7th Fleet in the South China Sea to search for survivors of a Cathay Pacific Airways passenger plane, shot down by communist Chinese aircraft near Hainan Island. On 25 July, Hornet aircraft supported planes from Template:USS as they shot down two attacking Chinese communist fighters. After tensions eased, she returned to San Francisco on 12 December, trained out of San Diego, then sailed on 4 May 1955 to join the 7th Fleet in the Far East.


Hornet helped cover the evacuation of Vietnamese from the Communist-controlled north to South Vietnam, then ranged from Japan to Formosa, Okinawa, and the Philippines in readiness training with the 7th Fleet. She returned to San Diego on 10 December and entered the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard the following month for conversion that included a hurricane bow and the installation of an angled flight deck, which permits the simultaneous launching and recovery of aircraft.


Following her modernization overhaul, Hornet operated along the California coast. She departed San Diego on 21 January 1957 to bolster the strength of the 7th Fleet until her return from the troubled Far East on 25 July.


Following a similar cruise, 6 January–2 July 1958, the ship was redesignated CVS-12 (anti-submarine warfare support carrier). In August, she entered Puget Sound Naval Shipyard for the conversion work to an ASW carrier. On 3 April 1959, she sailed from Long Beach to join the 7th Fleet in antisubmarine warfare tactics ranging from Japan to Okinawa and the Philippines. She returned home in October, for training along the western seaboard.

Vietnam and the Space Race: 1960 to 1970

The Apollo program exhibit on Hornet.


In the following years, Hornet was regularly deployed to the 7th Fleet for operations ranging from the coast of South Vietnam, to the shores of Japan, the Philippines and Okinawa and she also played a key part in the Apollo program, as a recovery ship Ώ] for unmanned and manned spaceflights.


On 25 August 1966, she was on recovery station for the flight of AS-202, the second unmanned flight of a production Apollo Command and Service Module. The moonship rocketed three-quarters of the way around the globe in 93 minutes before splashdown near Wake Island. Scorched from the heat of its re-entry into the Earth's atmosphere, the Apollo space capsule, designed to carry American astronauts to the moon, was brought aboard Hornet after its test that command module is currently on display aboard Hornet. ΐ] Α] Β]

Apollo 11 crew, Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins, Edwin Aldrin, inside the Mobile Quarantine Facility being greeted by President Nixon aboard Hornet.


Hornet returned to Long Beach on 8 September, but headed back to the Far East on 27 March 1967. She reached Japan exactly a month later and departed the Sasebo base on 19 May for the war zone. She operated in Vietnamese waters throughout the first half of 1967.


Hornet recovered the astronauts from the first moon landing mission, Apollo 11, on 24 July 1969. Γ] President Nixon was on board to welcome the returning astronauts back to Earth, where they lived in quarantine aboard Hornet prior to transfer to the Lunar Receiving Laboratory at Houston. Δ] The first steps on Earth of returning moonwalkers Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, with Command Module Pilot Michael Collins, are marked on her hangar deck, as part of her Apollo program exhibit.


Hornet once again served in the space program with the recovery of Apollo 12 on 24 November. Returning astronauts Charles Conrad, Jr., Alan L. Bean, and Richard F. Gordon, Jr., were picked up from their splashdown point near American Samoa. Ε]

Retirement: 1970 to present

Hornet was decommissioned 26 June 1970 and mothballed at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility. Hornet was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 25 July 1989. In 1991, she was designated a National Historic Landmark. Ζ] Η] ⎖]


On 17 October 1998, she was opened to the public as the USS Hornet Museum at the former Naval Air Station Alameda in Alameda, California. She was designated a California Historical Landmark in 1999. Hornet now hosts a variety of national events, including the official launching of the website Military.com in 1999.


Building on her status as an authentically restored aircraft carrier, Hornet has featured in a number of film and television shows. ⎗] Several TV shows, including a number of phantom-themed shows, have been recorded on board and in 1999 she was the subject of an episode of the TV series JAG. ⎗] In 2004 she was the set for scenes from the movie xXx: State of the Union, which starred Ice Cube, ⎘] and portions of the 2007 film Rescue Dawn, which starred Christian Bale, were shot on board. Hornet was both the subject and the setting of the independent film Carrier (2006). ⎗] ⎙]


The carrier was the host to a 2 day video game tournament on October 14th to October 16th 2011, for the game Battlefield 3. Players will host a LAN game on computers which is sponsored by the Graphic card maker NVIDIA. ⎚]


USS Hornet (CV 12)

USS HORNET was the fourth ESSEX - class aircraft carrier and the eighth ship in the Navy to bear the name. Originally scheduled to be named KEARSARGE, the ship was renamed after the loss of CV 8. The USS HORNET underwent the SCB-27A modernization at the New York Naval Shipyard from 1951-1952, and was subsequently redesignated as CVA 12 on October 1, 1952. Fitted with an angled deck during her SCB-125 conversion at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in 1956, the HORNET underwent another conversion at this shipyard in 1958 during which she was converted to an antisubmarine warfare aircraft carrier (CVS 12).

Decommissioned on June 26, 1970, the HORNET was stricken from the Navy list on July 25, 1989. In April 1993, the carrier was sold for scrapping but could be safed by the Aircraft Carrier HORNET Foundation for use as a museum at Alameda, Calif. In 1998, the USS HORNET officially became a floating museum at pier 3, Alameda Point, Alameda, Calif. Click here for a Photo Tour of the USS HORNET at Alameda, Calif.

General Characteristics: Awarded: September 9, 1940
Keel laid: August 3, 1942
Launched: August 30, 1943
Commissioned: November 29, 1943
Decommissioned: January 15, 1947
Recommissioned: March 20, 1951
Decommissioned: May 12, 1951
Recommissioned: September 11, 1953
Decommissioned: June 26, 1970
Builder: Newport News Shipbuilding, Newport News, Va.
Propulsion system: 8 boilers
Propellers: four
Aircraft elevators: three
Arresting gear cables: four
Catapults: two
Length: 896 feet (273 meters)
Flight Deck Width: 191.9 feet (58.5 meters)
Beam: 101 feet (30.8 meters)
Draft: 30.8 feet (9.4 meters)
Displacement: approx. 40,600 tons full load
Speed: 33 knots
Planes: 80-100 planes
Crew: approx. 3448 as CVS: 115 officers, 1500 enlisted
Armament: see down below

This section contains the names of sailors who served aboard USS HORNET. It is no official listing but contains the names of sailors who submitted their information.

About the different armament:

  • 1945: 12 5-inch (12.7 cm) 38 caliber guns, 68 40mm guns and 35 20mm guns
  • 1953: 8 5-inch (12.7 cm) 38 caliber guns and 28 3-inch (7.6 cm) 50 caliber guns
  • 1957: 7 5-inch (12.7 cm) 38 caliber guns and 8 3-inch (7.6 cm) 50 caliber guns
  • 1970: 4 5-inch (12.7 cm) 38 caliber guns

Accidents aboard USS HORNET:

DateWhereEvents
June 4-5, 1945western PacificUSS HORNET is caught in a howling typhoon which collapses some 25 feet of her forward flight deck.

USS HORNET was launched 30 August 1943 by the Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Newport News, Va. sponsored by Mrs. Frank M. Knox, wife of the Secretary of the Navy and commissioned 29 November 1943, Captain Miles M. Browning in command.

HORNET conducted shakedown training off Bermuda before departing Norfolk 14 February 1944 to join the Fast Carrier Task Force 20 March at Majuro Atoll in the Marshalls. After lending air support to protect the invasion beaches in New Guinea, she conducted massive aerial raids against Japanese bases in the Caroline Islands and prepared to support the amphibious assault for the occupation of the Marianas Islands.

On 11 June 1944 HORNET launched raids on Tinian and Saipan. The following day she conducted heavy bombing attacks on Guam and Rota. During 15 to 16 June, she blasted enemy airfields at Iwo and Chichi Jima to prevent air attacks on troops invading Saipan in the Marianas. The afternoon of 18 June 1944 HORNET formed with the Fast Carrier Task Force to intercept the Japanese First Mobile Fleet, headed through the Philippine Sea for Saipan. The Battle of the Philippine Sea opened 19 June 1944 when HORNET launched strikes to destroy as many land-based Japanese planes as possible before the carrier-based Japanese aircraft came in.

The enemy approached the American carriers in four massive waves. But fighter aircraft from HORNET and other carriers did a magnificent job and broke up all the attacks before the Japanese aerial raiders reached the task force. Nearly every Japanese aircraft was shot down in the great air battles of 19 June 1944 that became commonly known as "The Marianas Turkey Shoot." As the Japanese Mobile Fleet fled in defeat on 20 June, the carriers launched long-range air strikes that sank Japanese carrier HIJI and so damaged two tankers that they were abandoned and scuttled. Admiral Ozawa's own flag log for 20 June 1944 showed his surviving carrier air power as only 35 operational aircraft out of the 430 planes with which he had commenced the Battle of the Philippine Sea.

HORNET, basing from Eniwetok in the Marshalls, raided enemy installations ranging from Guam to the Bonins then turned her attention to the Palaus, throughout the Philippine Sea, and to enemy bases on Okinawa and Formosa. Her aircraft gave direct support to the troops invading Leyte 20 October 1944. During the Battle for Leyte Gulf she launched raids for damaging hits to the Japanese center force in the Battle off Samar, and hastened the retreat of the enemy fleet through the Sibuyan Sea towards Borneo.

In the following months HORNET attacked enemy shipping and airfields throughout the Philippines. This included participation in a raid that destroyed an entire Japanese convoy in Ormoc Bay. On 30 December 1944 she departed Ulithi in the Carolines for raids against Formosa, Indochina, and the Pescadores Islands. In route back to Ulithi, HORNET planes made photo reconnaissance of Okinawa 22 January 1945 to aid the planned invasion of that "last stepping-stone to Japan."

HORNET again departed Ulithi 10 February for full-scale aerial assaults on Tokyo, then supported the amphibious landing assault on Iwo Jima 19-20 February 1945.

Repeated raids were made against the Tokyo industrial complex, and Okinawa was hard hit. On 1 April 1945 HORNET planes gave direct support to the amphibious assault landings on Okinawa. On 6 April her aircraft joined in attacks which sank the mighty Japanese battleship YAMATO and her entire task force as it closed Okinawa. The following two months found HORNET alternating between close support to ground troops on Okinawa and hard-hitting raids to destroy the industrial capacity of Japan. She was caught in a howling typhoon 4 to 5 June 1945 which collapsed some 25 feet of her forward flight deck.

HORNET was routed back to the Philippines and from there to San Francisco, arriving 7 July 1946. Her overhaul was complete by 13 September 1945 when she departed as a part of the "Magic Carpet" operation that saw her return home troops from the Marianas and Hawaiian Islands. She returned to San Francisco 9 February 1946. She decommissioned there 15 January 1947, and joined the Pacific Reserve Fleet.

HORNET recommissioned 20 March 1951, then sailed from San Francisco for the New York Naval Shipyard where she decommissioned 12 May 1951 for conversion to an attack aircraft carrier (CVA 12). She recommissioned 11 September 1953 and trained in the Caribbean Sea before departure from Norfolk 11 May 1954 on an eight-month global cruise.

After operations in the Mediterranean Sea and the Indian Ocean, HORNET joined the mobile 7th fleet in the South China Sea where 25 July, search planes from her task group shot down two attacking Chinese Communist fighter planes. She returned to San Francisco 12 December 1954, trained out of San Diego, then sailed 4 May 1955 to join the 7th fleet in the Far East.

HORNET helped cover the evacuation of Vietnamese from the Communist controlled north to freedom in South Vietnam, then ranged from Japan to Formosa, Okinawa, and the Philippines in readiness training with the 7th fleet. She returned to San Diego 10 December 1955 and entered the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard the following month for conversion that included a hurricane bow and the installation of an angled flight deck which permits the simultaneous launching and recovery of aircraft.

Following her modernization overhaul, HORNET operated along the California coast. She departed San Diego 21 January 1957 to bolster the strength of the 7th fleet until her return from the troubled Far East 25 July. Following a similar cruise, 6 January - 2 July 1958, she was converted to an Antisubmarine Warfare Support Carrier (CVS 12) in the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. On 3 April 1959 she sailed from Long Beach to join the 7th fleet in antisubmarine warfare tactics ranging from Japan to Okinawa and the Philippines. She returned home in October, for training along the western seaboard.

In the following years, HORNET was regularly deployed to the 7th fleet for operations ranging from the coast of South Vietnam, to the shores of Japan, the Philippines and Okinawa. On 25 August 1966 she was on recovery station for the unmanned Apollo moonship that rocketed three-quarters of the way around the globe in 93 minutes before splashdown near Wake Island. Scorched from the heat of its re-entry into the earth's atmosphere, the Apollo space capsule, designed to carry American astronauts to the moon, was brought aboard HORNET after its test.

HORNET returned to Long Beach 8 September, but headed back to the Far East 27 March 1967. She reached Japan exactly a month later and departed Sasebo 19 May for the war zone. She operated in Vietnamese waters throughout the remainder of spring and during much of the summer of 1967 aiding in the struggle to keep freedom alive in Southeast Asia.

HORNET was the recovery carrier for the Apollo 11 moon mission during which astronauts Neil Armstrong, and Edwin Aldrin Jr., landed on and walked on the moon in July 1969. Fellow astronaut Michael Collins remained in orbit around the moon. On 24 November, the Apollo 12 astronauts - all Naval Aviators - Richard F. Gordon, Charles Conrad Jr., and Alan L. Bean were recovered by Helicopter Antisubmarine Squadron Four (HS 4) and returned to Hornet.

HORNET was decommissioned 26 June 1970. Following nearly two decades in mothballs, she was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register 25 July 1989, and sold for breaking up in April 1993. However, the old carrier was saved from the scrap heap by the efforts of historically-minded citizens and was donated to The Aircraft Carrier HORNET Foundation for use as a museum at Alameda, Calif., on 26 May 1998.

HORNET received the Presidential Unit Citation and seven battle stars for service in World War II.

Click here to get a view of the deployments of USS HORNET

The photos below were taken by me on July 18, 2006, during a visit to the USS HORNET museum at Alameda, Calif.


USS Hornet prior to commissioning - History

Construction of the ninth Nimitz class ship took place at Northrop Grumman Newport News, Va., starting with the ship's keel laying February 12, 1998, and christening March 4, 2001.

In September 2002, The newest Nimitz-class aircraft carrier moved a little closer to commissioning with the testing of the flight deck's catapult one. The tests ran included the launching of "dummy loads", to certify the ships ability to successfully launch aircraft.

The Reagan was scheduled for its first sea trials in February 2003, when the shipyard was to turn the ship over to the Navy.

Numerous delays began to impact on the construction of the CVN 76 in early 2003. Numerous weather delays prevented work from being completed in the flight deck and on the integrated communications system. Furthermore, a fire in late February caused by a faulty circuit breaker caused the Navy and the shipyard to postpone the delivery of the Reagan and her commissioning. Nearly 600 other circuit breakers were retested to insure safety, but it was discovered that nearly 20 percent of those tested were faulty.

In May 2003 the crew of PCU Ronald Reagan passed Phase II Crew Certification. The purpose of crew certification is to determine the ability of the crew to evaluate its own training and its competency to train to Type Commander objectives.

June 20, The U.S. Navy accepted delivery of the newest aircraft carrier, PCU Ronald Reagan.

July 12, 2003 USS Ronald Reagan was commissioned during an 11 a.m. ceremony at Norfolk Naval Station. Vice President Richard Cheney delivered the ceremony's principal address while Nancy Reagan, wife of the ship's namesake, served as the ship's sponsor.

August 28, Capt. James A. Simonds relieved Capt. John W. Goodwin as commanding officer of the CVN 76.

May 2, 2004 USS Ronald Reagan re-delivered to the Navy, marking the end of a five-month Post Shakedown Availability/Selected Restricted Availability (PSA/SRA) at Northrop Grumman, Newport News (NGNN). The re-delivery actually took place while the aircraft carrier was at sea off the Virginia coast, following the successful completion of 2 days of sea trials. Major work items completed during the PSA/SRA included the addition of a 1,300-square-foot gymnasium, expanded crew laundry facilities, mast antenna modifications to optimize performance, and upgrades to accommodate the Navy's newest tactical jet fighter the F/A-18 E/F Super Hornet.

In early May the Reagan got underway for its second set of flight deck certifications. This was the ship's first underway since its maiden port visit to Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., in November 2003. Seven squadrons were on board to assist with the certification. The certifications began on May 5 and ended on May 8.

May 10, an F-14 from VF-213 "Black Lions", was launched from the carrier in what was the final Tomcat to leave the deck of USS Ronald Reagan.

May 27, USS Ronald Reagan departed Naval Station Norfolk for the final time to circumnavigate South America on its way to its new homeport of San Diego.

June 9, the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier pulled into Rio De Janeiro, Brazil, for a scheduled port visit.

June 27, USS Ronald Reagan get anchored off the coast of Valparaiso, Chile, for a port call.

June 29, Latin America&rsquos first multinational amphibious exercise launched June 24 with a record 11 nations participating: Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, United States and Uruguay, along with observers from Colombia and Mexico. More than 5,000 U.S. Sailors and Marines will participate in the amphibious phase of UNITAS, including Marine Force UNITAS, USS Tortuga (LSD 46) and USS Ronald Reagan Strike Group. This year's UNITAS is part of the U.S. Navy's Summer Pulse 2004, which involves the simultaneous deployment of seven aircraft carrier strike groups (CSGs), demonstrating the ability of the Navy to provide credible combat power across the globe, in five theaters with other U.S., allied, and coalition military forces. Summer Pulse is the Navy&rsquos first deployment under its new Fleet Response Plan (FRP).

July 5, USS Ronald Reagan CSG completed Silent Forces Exercises (SIFOREX), after four days of Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) tactics with the Peruvian Navy.

July 23, CVN 76 arrived in Naval Air Station North Island in San Diego, Calif., after a two-month transit from Norfolk, Va.

November 6, USS Ronald Reagan got underway for the first time since arriving at its new homeport of San Diego. The ship has been in a maintenance availability period since its arrival to have repairs done and to upgrade work centers that weren’t completed while the ship was in Norfolk.

December 16, CVN 76 is currently underway in Pacific Ocean cunducting carrier qualifications for the west coast Fleet Replacement Squadrons (FRS).

January 11, 2005 The Reagan departed San Diego for a routine carrier operations in the local area and to drop off two Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 30 C-2A Greyhound aircraft in Hawaii to help support Operation Unified Assistance. Operation Unified Assistance is the worldwide humanitarian effort to help Southern Asia recover from the devastating tsunamis that paralyzed the region Dec. 26.

January 22, The aircraft carrier pulled into Naval Station Pearl Harbor for a three-day port visit after spending 12 days underway on a mission supporting Operation Unified Assistance. It returned to San Diego on Feb. 5.

March 30, USS Ronald Reagan is currently undergoing a period of planned maintenance availability in her homeport of San Diego.

April 19, CVN 76 is currrently conducting Carrier Assessment Readiness Test (CART II), in her homeport of Naval Air Station North Island, in preparation for an upcomonig underway period.

April 27, The aircraft carrier is currently conducting routine carrier operations in the Pacific Ocean.

May 16, The Reagan is currently underway in Pacific Ocean conducting carrier qualifications for the west coast Fleet Replacement Squadrons.

May 30, USS Ronald Reagan is currently underway conducting routine carrier operations.

June 3, The Reagan is currently conducting Combat System Ship&rsquos Qualification Trials (CSSQT).

June 15, CVN 76 is currently underway in the Pacific Ocean conducting a Board of Inspection and Survey inspection.

June 24, The RR returned to its homeport after routine carrier operations in Pacific Ocean. Underway again on June 27 to conduct CQ for various West coast Fleet Replacement Squadrons.

July 10, Reagan is currently underway in the Pacific Ocean conducting Tailored Ships Training Availability (TSTA).

July 16, Hundreds of friends, family members and shipmates gathered, during a memorial service held aboard USS Ronald Reagan, to remember retired Vice Adm. James B. Stockdale and the former prisoner of war and Congressional Medal of Honor recipient who passed away July 5 in Coronado, Calif.

August 1, USS Ronald Reagan and embarked Carrier Air Wing Fourteen (CVW 14) are currently underway in the Pacific Ocean conducting routine carrier operations.

August 10, CVN 76 is currently underway in the Pacific Ocean conducting carrier qualifications for the various West Coast FRS.

August 20, The San Diego-based aircraft carrier is currently conducting a weekend port call in Santa Barbara, California.

September 20, USS Ronald Reagan is currently underway in the Pacific Ocean conducting CQ.

October 1, Nearly 3,000 friends and family members of the Reagan Sailors embarked the ship for a day of activities and sightseeing for the ship's Friends and Family Day Cruise. The event coincided with the annual San Diego Sea and Air Parade, which included demonstrations by various naval vessels and aircraft.

November 10, CVN 76 returned to homeport, after 18-day, following completion of the Composite Unit Training Exercise (COMPTUEX) in preparation for the upcoming deployment next year.

November 17, Capt. Terry B. Kraft relieved Capt. James A. Symonds as CO of the USS Ronald Reagan, during a change-of-command ceremony held aboard the ship at Naval Air Station North Island.

December 6, The aircraft carrier and embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 14 departed San Diego to participate in Joint Task Force Exercise. JTFEX 06-2 is scheduled to take place Dec. 7-15 off the coast of southern California, and is designed to be a realistic exercise in real-world operations and the operational challenges faced by U.S. forces in cooperation with coalition militaries.

December 17, CVN 76 returned to homeport after completing a JTFEX 06-2.

January 4, 2006 USS Ronald Reagan departed San Diego on its maiden deployment in support of the Global War on Terrorism.

January 9, Sailors from Reagan, civilian mariners from USNS Rainier (T-AOE 7) and the pilots and aircrew of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 4 helped rescue a man who suffered from chest pains while aboard a civilian fishing vessel in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. Two HH-60H helicopters from HS-4 were dispatched from carrier at approximately 10 a.m. to transport the patient from Rainier to Reagan for medical treatment.

From January 9-12, USS Ronald Reagan participated in Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) exercise off the coast of Hawaii. The goal of the exercise was to test the anti-submarine warfare capabilities of the CSG in real-world scenarios. Anti-submarine warfare is critical to support the "Sea Shield" pillar of the Chief of Naval Operation&rsquos "Sea Power 21." This concept calls for the ability to form a maritime shield to defend "Sea Base" areas against submarine and mine threats, and ensure a safe, protected sea passage of U.S. and coalition forces to and from the fight.

January 12, Cmdr. Gregory Harris relieved Cmdr. Steven James, as commanding officer of the "Eagles" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 115, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

January 27, USS Ronald Reagan departed Brisbane, Australia, after a five-day port visit.

January 29, A single seat F/A-18C Hornet assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 25, "Fist of the Fleet", was involved in a mishap while attempting to land on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan approximately 120 miles southeast of Brisbane, Australia, Jan. 28 at approximately 4:17 a.m. (PST). The pilot ejected safely and was recovered. There were no injuries.

February 7, The Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group arrived in Singapore for a scheduled port visit.

February 22, F/A-18E Super Hornets assigned to the "Eagles" of VFA-115 became the first aircraft launched from the flight deck of USS Ronald Reagan to drop ordnance on enemy targets in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

March 19, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier departed Jebel Ali, U.A.E., after a five-day port call.

April 27, USS Ronald Reagan, along with USS Vicksburg (CG 69) and USS McCampbell (DDG 85), took part in a passing exercise (PASSEX) with the French navy aircraft carrier FS Charles de Gaulle (R91) and FS Cassard (D614), the lead ship in the Cassard class of French anti-air frigates. Exercises included drills in communications, air defense and surface warfare tactics. Aircrafts from the Charles de Gaulle also made "touch-and-go" landings aboard Reagan during the exercise.

May 14, USS Ronald Reagan pulled into Jebel Ali, U.A.E., for a liberty port visit to Dubai.

May 29, USS Ronald Reagan and Carrier Air Wing Fourteen concluded military operations in the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Operations (AoO). CVW 14 launched more than 6,100 sorties, totaling more than 19,600 flight hours, more than 2,940 sorties and 14,200 flight hours have been in direct support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

June 3, CVN 76 pulled into Port Klang, Malaysia, for a scheduled port visit. Anchored off Hong Kong from June 10-14.

June 16, More than 300 aircraft and 28 ships from the USS Ronald Reagan, USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) Carrier Strike Groups, as well as the Marine Corps, Air Force and Coast Guard, will participate in exercise Valiant Shield 2006, off the coast of Guam, from June 19-23. The exercise will involve more than 20,000 Sailors, Airmen, Soldiers, Marines and Coast Guardsmen.

July 6, USS Ronald Reagan returned to NAS North Island after a six-month deployment in the Arabian Gulf and western Pacific Ocean. As part of CVW-14, VAQ-139 was also the first EA-6B "Prowler" squadron to deploy with the Improved Capability Three (ICAP III) system. In addition, VFA-25, VFA-113, VFA-22 and VFA-115 were the first F/A-18 Hornet squadrons to deploy with ROVER (Remotely Operated Video Enhanced Receiver), a capability to communicate and transfer video to the JTAC (Joint Terminal Air Controller) on the ground.

August 15, The Reagan is currently underway for routine training in the SOCAL Op. Area.

August 28, CVN 76 is currently underway conducting Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS-CQ).

October 20, USS Ronald Reagan returned to homeport following a successful week of carrier qualifications off the coast of southern California. The Reagan reached an aviation milestone Oct. 18, successfully completing 20,000 arrested landings since the ship was commissioned in 2003. Completing the milestone recovery was Lt. j.g. Robert Prince, from the Training Squadron (VT) 9 "Tigers", who has been in the naval aviation training program for the past 18 months.

November 3, A new type of aircraft arresting gear control system will be installed on USS Ronald Reagan in 2007 during the ship's next scheduled maintenance period. The new arresting gear control system, the Advanced Recovery Control System (ARC), replaces the mechanical systems and their associated controls used today with state-of-the-art arresting gear digital control system technology. The ARC system has successfully arrested the landings of all current and future Navy and Marine Corps carrier-based aircraft, like the T-45, E-2C+, F/A-18C/D, F/A-18E/F, EA-18G, S-3, and EA-6B aircraft.

November 9, USS Ronald Reagan CSG is off the coast of southern California participating in large-scale joint operations with the USS John C. Stennis Strike Group, which is conducting Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) 07-1 in preparation for the upcoming deployment.

November 21, CVN 76 returned to San Diego following a 12-day quarterly sustainment training under the Navy's Fleet Response Training Plan (FRTP).

December 2, USS Ronald Reagan is currently underway conducting routine carrier operations in the southern California operating area.

December 19, The Reagan is currently moored pierside at NAS North Island following a Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualification (FRS-CQ).

January 27, 2007 USS Ronald Reagan departed San Diego for a surge deployment in the western Pacific, under the Navy's Fleet Response Plan (FRP), while USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) undergoes scheduled maintenance in Yokosuka, Japan.

February 9, CVN 76 Carrier Strike Group entered the U.S. 7th Fleet&rsquos area of responsibility (AOR).

February 24, USS Ronald Reagan, along with USS Lake Champlain (CG 57), pulled into Sasebo, Japan, for a scheduled port visit.

March 1, Capt. Richard Butler relieved Capt. Craig Williams as CO of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 14 during an aerial change of command ceremony. Butler, a native of Lexington, Ky., graduated from the University of Kentucky in 1983. He entered officer candidate school in 1983 and was designated a naval aviator in July 1985.

March 7, The Reagan CSG arrived in Hong Kong for a scheduled port call.

March 15, Capt. Richard "Rhett" Butler achieved his 1,000th carrier-arrested landing while flying an F/A-18E Super Hornet from Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 115.

March 18, USS Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group took part in a passing exercise with the Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF) in the Philippine Sea March 16-18. JMSDF ships participating in the PASSEX were the JS Myoko (DDG 175), JS Hamagiri (DD 155), JS Yuugiri (DD 153) and JS Haruna (DDH 141).

March 22, CVN 76 arrived in Busan, Republic of Korea, for a scheduled port visit in conjunction with Exercise Reception, Staging, Onward Movement and Integration/Foal Eagle 2007. RSOI/FE 07 is a scheduled combined/joint exercise conducted annually involving forces from both the United States and the Republic of Korea.

April 7, USS Ronald Reagan concluded a three-day ammunition offload with the Military Sealift Command (MSC) ammunition ship USNS Flint (T-AE 32), marking the beginning of the end of carrier's surge deployment.

April 9, The aircraft carrier pulled into Pearl Harbor for a brief port visit. Before departing for San Diego, more than 500 friends and family members of the Reagan crew are expected to board the ship as part of the "Tiger Cruise."

April 20, USS Ronald Reagan returned to Naval Air Station North Island after a three-month underway period.

October 31, CVN 76 returned to San Diego following a two-day sea trials, after a 6-month planned incremental availability (PIA). From advanced combat systems and electronics installation, improved berthing compartments and new deck tiles, Ronald Reagan received more than $150-million in renovations and upgrades since entering the PIA cycle in May.

November 9, The Reagan returned to homeport after completing four-days flight deck certification. Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on Nov. 11.

November 16, Rear Adm. James P. Wisecup relieved Rear Adm. Charles W. Martoglio as commander of Carrier Strike Group Seven, during a change of command ceremony held aboard its flagship, USS Ronald Reagan.

November 27, CVN 76 departed homeport for Tailored Ships Training Availability (TSTA) period.

December 15, Sailors from USS Ronald Reagan, and the pilots and aircrew of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Four (HS-4) rescued a teenage girl who suffered a ruptured appendix while aboard a Bermuda-flagged cruise ship off the coast of southern Baja California, Mexico.

December 18, The aircraft carrier returned to Naval Air Station North Island after a 21-day underway period completing the Tailored Ship's Training Availability and Final Evaluation Problem (TSTA/FEP).

January 11, 2008 USS Ronald Reagan anchored off Santa Barbara, Calif., for a scheduled port visit. During the two day period Jan. 8-10, the Military Sealift Command ammunition ship USNS Flint (T-AE 32) trasfered more than two million pounds of ordanance to CVN 76 Returned to San Diego on Jan. 15.

January 28, The Reagan is currently of the coast of southern California conducting carrier qualifications.

March 9, CVN 76 is currently conducting CQ for Fleet Replacement Squadrons (FRS) off the West Coast.

April 7, USS Ronald Reagan CSG returned to San Diego after completing a 22-day Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX), off the coast of southern California, as part of the training cycle for a regularly scheduled deployment.

April 14, The Reagan Carrier Strike Group is currently participating in Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) 08-5, from April 11-18. Returned home on April 22.

May 19, USS Ronald Reagan, commanded by Capt. Kenneth J. Norton, departed NAS North Island for a scheduled deployment.

June 12, Cmdr. Richard T. Brophy relieved Cmdr. Eric K. Wright as CO of the "Eagles" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 115, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

June 19, CVN 76 CSG arrived in Hong Kong for a scheduled port visit.

June 25, USS Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group and USNS Safeguard (T-ARS 50) recently arrived off the coast of Philippines to provide humanitarian assistance and disaster relief to victims of the Typhoon Fengshen and to help in salvage operations for the ill-fated MV Princess of the Stars. The 24,000-tonne ferry was carrying 864 passengers and crew when it sank Saturday off Sibuyan Island, 300 kilometres south of Manila, at the height of a typhoon.

July 3, USS Ronald Reagan departed the Sulu Sea and the waters around the Philippine island of Panay, after assisting the Philippine government's humanitarian relief operation. Aircrews flew 332 sorties around Panay and delivered more than 519,000 pounds of much-needed supplies to typhoon victims.

July 6, The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier pulled into Apra Harbor, Guam, for a routine port call.

July 14, CVN 76 arrived in Busan, Republic of Korea, for a scheduled port visit.

July 28, The Reagan pulled into Sasebo, Japan, for a routine port call.

August 18, USS Ronald Reagan, along with USS Gridley (DDG 101) and USS Chancellorsville (CG 62), pulled into Port Klang, Malaysia, for a port visit.

September 3, The Reagan recently relieved USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) on station in the North Arabian Sea. CVN 76 launched its first sorties on Aug. 28, in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

October 22, USS Ronald Reagan CSG is currently off the coast of India participating in Exercise Malabar 2008 Oct. 15-24.

October 25, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier arrived in Singapore for a scheduled port call.

November 17, The Reagan pulled into Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, for a routine port visit.

November 25, USS Ronald Reagan returned to San Diego after a six-month deployment. The aircraft from CVW-14 launched more than 1150 sorties in support of ground forces in southern Afghanistan.

February 17, 2009 CVN 76 departed Naval Air Station North Island for Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications off the coast of southern California. Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 129 is also training instructor pilots to aid the transition from EA-6B Prowler to EA-18G Growler while underway with the Reagan. This marks the first landing of VAQ 129's Growlers aboard an aircraft carrier.

March 26, The Ronald Reagan returned to homeport after completing the two-week sustainment exercise in the Pacific Ocean, along with embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 14 and ships from CSG 7. SUSTAINEX is the last coordinated exercise involving the ships of Carrier Strike Group Seven prior to its upcoming deployment later this year.

April 16, The aircraft carrier is currently off the coast of southern California conducting CQ.

May 28, USS Ronald Reagan departed homeport for a scheduled western Pacific and Middle East deployment. The departure was delayed for 24 hours because of a malfunction in a voltage regulator on one of the ship's eight electrical generators.

June 21, CVN 76 commemorated the one-year anniversary of Typhoon Fengshen relief efforts while transiting the Sulu Sea near the Republic of the Philippines.

June 24, The Reagan moored at Berth 3/4, Changi Naval Base in Singapore for a scheduled port visit.

July 6, Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 14 launched its first combat sorties in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan, after USS Ronald Reagan relieved USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) on station in the North Arabian Sea.

August 2, Cmdr. Scott E. Raupp relieved Cmdr. Erik O. Etz as CO of the "Stingers" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 113, during an aerial change of command ceremony.

September 12, Cmdr. Warren E. Sisson, III relieved Cmdr. Richard T. Brophy as CO of the "Eagles" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 115, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

September 22, USS Ronald Reagan, along with USS Chancellorsville (CG 62) and USS Gridley (DDG 101), anchored off the coast of Phuket, Thailand, for a goodwill port call. The aircraft carrier recently completed operations in the U.S. 5th Fleet AoR, launching more than 1,600 sorties in support of OEF.

October 13, CVN 76 pulled into Pearl Harbor for a brief port call and to pick up 850 "Tigers."

October 21, USS Ronald Reagan returned to San Diego after a five-month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 7th Fleet AoR.

February 22, 2010 Chief Electrician&rsquos Mate (SS/DV) John G. Conyers died Friday after he suffered severe electrical shock while conducting routine electrical work aboard the Reagan. The aircraft carrier is currently undergoing a planned incremental maintenance period at Naval Air Station North Island.

May 18, USS Ronald Reagan departed for sea trials after completing the six-month PIA.

June 2, CVN 76 departed homeport to conduct flight deck certification with the CVW-14.

June 9, The Reagan anchored in the approach to Esquimalt harbor, near Victoria, British Columbia, to participate in the Canadian Naval Centennial Pacific Fleet Review, commemorating the 100th birthday of the Canadian Navy. USS Sampson (DDG 102), USS Chosin (CG 65) and USS Ford (FFG 54) are also participating.

June 16, USS Ronald Reagan departed San Diego again, after picking up members from CVW-14, to conduct Tailored Ships Training Availability (TSTA) and to participate in biennial exercise Rim of the Pacific 2010, off the coast of Hawaii, from June 23 through Aug. 1.

June 28, The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier arrived in Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam for the in-port phase of 22nd RIMPAC. Thirty-two ships, five submarines, more than 170 aircraft and 20,000 personnel are participating.

August 8, USS Ronald Reagan returned to Naval Air Station North Island after nearly a two-month underway period. The RIMPAC exercise allowed Reagan to test its Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) launcher weapons system for the first time since 2007.

August 12, Capt. Thom W. Burke relieved Capt. Kenneth J. Norton as CO of the Reagan during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship.

August 25, The Ronald Reagan departed San Diego for a Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) assessment.

September 8, The aircraft carrier departed homeport for routine operations off the coast of southern California, in preparation for the upcoming deployment next year.

October 18, USS Ronald Reagan CSG departed for Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) off the West Coast.

November 9, CVN 76 was diverted to a position south, to facilitate the delivery of needed supplies to the C/V Splendor. The Carnival cruise ship reported it was dead in the water early Monday, 150 nautical miles southwest of San Diego, and requested assistance from the Coast Guard.

December 17, The Reagan returned to homeport after a two-day underway off the coast of southern California.

January 4, 2011 USS Ronald Reagan departed Naval Air Station North Island for a two-week training and certification in preparation for an upcoming deployment.

February 2, USS Ronald Reagan CSG departed San Diego for a scheduled deployment in the U.S. 5th and 7th Fleet Areas of Responsibility (AoR). The Strike Group will first participate in Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX), off the coast of southern California, before heading west.

March 11, USS Ronald Reagan CSG, USS Essex (LHD 2), USS Blue Ridge (LCC 19), USS Germantown (LSD 42) and USS Harpers Ferry (LSD 49) were ordered to head to Japan and render disaster relief, if called upon, in the wake of a catastrophic magnitude 9.0 earthquake that left thousands dead on Friday. The Reagan was previously scheduled to visit Busan, Republic of Korea, before participating in exercise Foal Eagle 2011.

March 13, CVN 76 arrived on station off the east coast of Honshu, early Sunday, to serve as an afloat platform for refueling Japan Self Defense Force and other helicopters involved in rescue and recovery efforts ashore.

March 23, USS Ronald Reagan took a pause from flight operations today in order to conduct a fresh water washdown, on its flight deck and embarked aircraft, to remove any remaining traces of radioactive contamination from the Fukushima Dai-Ichi plant that might have been deposited while conducting disaster relief operations over the past 11 days.

April 8, USS Ronald Reagan is currently participating in exercise Malabar 2011, with the Indian Navy, in the Philippine Sea. The Reagan CSG concluded its support in Operation Tomodachi April 5.

April 18, Capt. Kevin Mannix, Deputy Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 14, completed his 1,000th arrested landing aboard the aircraft carrier with the trap of an F/A-18F assigned to the "Black Knights" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 154.

April 19, USS Ronald Reagan CSG arrived in Fleet Activities Sasebo for a three-day port call.

May 1, The Reagan Carrier Strike Group anchored off the coast of Phuket for a four-day visit to Thailand.

May 15, Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 14 recently launched its first combat sorties in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan.

May 22, USS Ronald Reagan pulled into Khalifa Bin Salman Port at Hidd for a four-day visit to Kingdom of Bahrain.

June 23, Cmdr. Russell W. Jones relieved Cmdr. Christopher A. Middleton as CO of the "Cougars" of Tactical Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 139, during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship. Jones will be the last Cougars commanding officer to fly an EA-6B Prowler since the squadron is scheduled to transition to the EA-18 Growler at the end of 2011.

August 12, USS Ronald Reagan CSG arrived in Hong Kong for a four-day port call.

August 21, The Reagan moored at Kilo Wharf in Apra Harbor, Guam, for a routine port visit.

August 31, The aircraft carrier arrived in Pearl Harbor for a three-day port visit and to pick up family and friends for a Tiger Cruise.

September 9, USS Ronald Reagan returned to San Diego after a seven-month deployment.

October 14, CVN 76 departed Naval Air Station North Island for carrier qualifications with the CVW-14 Returned home Nov. 3.

November 4, USS Ronald Reagan departed again to conduct CQ, off the coast of southern California, for Naval Air Training Command (NATRACOM).

November 11, The Reagan is currently underway for a Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS-CQ).

January 6, 2012 USS Ronald Reagan departed San Diego for a 12-month, $210 million worth, Drydocking Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS&IMF) in Bremerton, Wash.

March 12, 2013 The Ronald Reagan moored to Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton's Pier Bravo after a three-day underway for sea trials Departed Bremerton on March 18 Returned to San Diego on March 21.

May 3, USS Ronald Reagan departed NAS North Island for a 12-day underway to conduct flight deck certifications, CVW-2/FRS Carrier Qualifications (CQ) and ammo onload with the USNS Richard E. Byrd (T-AKE 4).

June 3, Vice Adm. Kenneth E. Floyd relieved Vice Adm. Gerald R. Beaman as Commander, U.S. Third Fleet during a change-of-command ceremony on board the Reagan at Naval Air Station North Island.

June 6, CVN 76 departed San Diego for a six-day underway to conduct routine training in the SOCAL Op. Area. Underway for FRS/TRACOM Carrier Qualifications from July 11-22.

August 13, Capt. Christopher E. Bolt relieved Capt. Thom W. Burke as CO of the USS Ronald Reagan during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship.

September 5, The Ronald Reagan departed homeport for an eight-day underway to conduct routine training off the coast of southern California. Held an "Open House" at NAS North Island from Sept. 21-22 Underway again from Oct. 16-21 Underway for Group Sail with the CVW-2 and DESRON 9 from Oct. 30- Nov. 15.

December 4, USS Ronald Reagan departed Naval Air Station North Island for an eight-day underway to conduct routine training in the SOCAL Op. Area Underway for Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) CQ from Jan. 23-30, 2014 Underway for a Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Problem (FEP) with the CVW-2 from March 17- April 8 Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on April 9.

May 20, The Ronald Reagan departed homeport for FRS-CQ and ammo offload with the USNS Carl Brashear (T-AKE 7), after a six-week Continuous Maintenance Availability (CMAV).

May 30, USS Ronald Reagan anchored off the coast of Santa Barbara, Calif., for a three-day port visit. Returned to NAS North Island on June 3.

June 12, CVN 76 departed San Diego for Carrier Qualifications (CQ) with the CVW-2 and to participate in biennial multinational exercise Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) Departed SOCAL Op. Area on June 18.

June 23, Cmdr. Gregory P. Sawtell relieved Cmdr. Richard H. Weitzel as CO of the "Blue Hawks" of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 78, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

June 26, USS Ronald Reagan moored at Berth H3/H4 in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, for the in-port phase of RIMPAC 2014 Underway for at-sea phase on July 7 Inport Pearl Harbor again from July 31- Aug. 3.

August 10, The Ronald Reagan returned to homeport after a two-month underway period. Conducted Operational Reactor Safeguard Examination (ORSE) en route to San Diego.

August 14, Rear Adm. Patrick A. Piercey relieved Rear Adm. Patrick D. Hall as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9, during a change-of-command ceremony on board the Reagan.

September 4, Huntington Ingalls Inc. was awarded a $24,2 million modification to a previously awarded contract (N00024-13-C-4315) for the USS Ronald Reagan's Planned Incremental Availability (PIA). Work will be performed in Coronado, Calif., and is expected to be completed by April 2015 An adittional $11,2 million contract was awarded on Sept. 19.

April 17, 2015 USS Ronald Reagan departed Juliet Pier, NAS North Island for sea trials following a seven-month PIA Moored at Kilo Pier on April 20 Underway for flight deck certifications and CQ with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 from April 28- May 3 Underway for Combat System Ship&rsquos Qualification Trials (CSSQT), ammo onload with the USNS Cesar Chavez (T-AKE 14) and CVW-11/FRS/TRACOM Carrier Qualifications (CQ) from May 4-28.

June 26, The Ronald Reagan departed San Diego for a Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Problem (FEP) with the CVW-2 Moored at Berth Lima on July 20 Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on July 23.

July 24, Vice Adm. Nora W. Tyson relieved Vice Adm. Kenneth E. Floyd as Commander, U.S. 3rd Fleet during a change-of-command ceremony on board the CVN 76.

August 5, USS Ronald Reagan departed Carrier Wharf, NAS North Island for local operations.

August 8, The Ronald Reagan moored at Kilo Pier for a 10-day crew and equipment swap period. More than 1,400 crew members from Reagan will embark the USS George Washington for a two-month voyage to its new homeport of Norfolk, Virginia. The so called "Three Presidents Crew" will fly back to San Diego early next year. The rest of the Reagan's crew will stay in San Diego and will be assigned to USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71).

August 26, CVN 76 departed NAS North Island for a three-day underway to conduct post hull swap assessment and flight deck certifications with the CVW-11.

August 31, USS Ronald Reagan departed San Diego for a homeport change to Yokosuka, Japan.

September 1, USS Ronald Reagan embarked the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5, temporarily stationed at NAS Fallon, Nev., for the first time Arrived off the coast of Hawaii on Sept. 10 Entered the U.S. 7th Fleet Area of Operations on Sept. 17.

From September 23-24, the Ronald Reagan participated in an air defense exercise (ADEX), with the USS Chancellorsville (CG 62) and USS Preble (DDG 88), in the Guam Op. Area.

October 1, USS Ronald Reagan moored at Berth 12, Fleet Activities Yokosuka in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, for the first time.

October 12, The Ronald Reagan hosted mored than 15,000 visitors during an "Open House" at CFAY.

October 15, USS Ronald Reagan departed Yokosuka for its first western Pacific patrol as part of Forward Deployed Naval Forces (FDNF).

October 18, The Reagan Carrier Strike Group (CSG) participated in International Fleet Review, organised by the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF), in Sagami Bay.

October 18, An E-2C Hawkeye (Bureau #166505), assigned to the "Liberty Bells" of Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 115, suffered a Class "A" electrical fire in Hangar Bay #1, around 1.27 p.m. local time, while the aircraft carrier was underway south of Sagami Bay.

October 22, CVN 76 anchored in a water depth of more than 165 feet, off the east coast of Busan, Republic of Korea, after it paid out 11 shots of anchor chain equal to more than 15 fathoms, for a two-day stop.

October 23, The Ronald Reagan CSG participated in Republic of Korea (ROK) Navy&rsquos Fleet Review, while at deep-water anchorage, in conjunction with the 70th anniversary of the establishment of the ROK Navy and national independence.

From October 26-29, USS Ronald Reagan CSG participated in an air defense exercises (ADEX), east of the Korean Peninsula, with the ROKS Sejong the Great (DDG 991), ROKS Yulgok Yi I (DDG 992) and ROKS Yang Manchun (DDH 973).

October 30, The Reagan moored at Berth 1 in Busan Naval Base, ROK, for a five-day port visit.

November 14, Cmdr. David B. Waidelich relieved Cmdr. Michael D. France as CO of VAW-115 during an aerial change-of-command ceremony, while the aircraft carrier was underway in the Philippine Sea.

November 16, USS Ronald Reagan CSG commenced its participation in a nine-day bilateral Annual Exercise (ANNUALEX) 27G, between the U.S. and Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF), in the waters south of Japan.

November 21, Cmdr. Douglas T. Gray relieved Cmdr. Geoffrey P. Bowman as CO of the "Eagles" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 115, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

From December 1-2, the Ronald Reagan conducted ammunition offload with the USNS Wally Schirra (T-AKE 8) Returned to Yokosuka on Dec. 3.

April 12, 2016 Capt. Michael P. Donnelly relieved Capt. Christopher E. Bolt as the 7th CO of USS Ronald Reagan during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship at Berth 12, Fleet Activities Yokosuka.

May 9, USS Ronald Reagan departed Yokosuka for a four-day underway, to conduct sea trials and ammo onload with the USNS Wally Schirra, following a four-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) Underway again from May 31- June 1.

June 4, USS Ronald Reagan departed Berth 12, Fleet Activities Yokosuka for a Summer Patrol.

June 18, The Ronald Reagan CSG-5 conducted dual carrier flight operations, with the USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 3, while underway east of Okinawa, Japan Transited the Strait of Luzon westbound on July 1.

July 13, Cmdr. Daniel D. Cochran relieved Cmdr. Adrian T. Calder as CO of the "Royal Maces" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 27, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony, while the aircraft carrier was underway in the South China Sea.

July 26, USS Ronald Reagan returned to Yokosuka after completing a seven-week patrol.

July 29, Rear Adm. Charles F. Williams relieved Rear Adm. John D. Alexander as Commander, Task Force (TF) 70 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Reagan.

August 17, USS Ronald Reagan departed homeport for a Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) assessment Moored at Berth 12 on Aug. 18 Emergency sortied due to approaching Typhoon Lionrock from Aug. 28-31.

September 3, USS Ronald Reagan departed Fleet Activities Yokosuka for a routine Fall Patrol.

September 12, The Ronald Reagan CSG commenced its participation in a biennial field training exercise Valiant Shield 2016, in the Guam Op. Area.

September 13, The F/A-18 Super Hornets, assigned to the Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 115 and Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 138, participated in a sinking exercise (SINKEX) of the ex-USS Rentz (FFG 46), 117 nautical miles northeast of Guam.

September 24, CVN 76 moored at Kilo Wharf in Apra Harbor, Guam, for a five-day liberty port visit.

October 4, Cmdr. Robert G. Wickman relieved Cmdr. Kenneth P. Ward as CO of the "Saberhawks" of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 77, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

October 10, Seaman Danyelle Luckey died aboard the USS Ronald Reagan, from a yet-to-be-determined cause, while the ship was underway southwest of the Korean Peninsula.

October 11, Cmdr. Gregory P. Malandrino relieved Cmdr. Rafe K. Wysham as CO of the "Diamondbacks" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 102, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

October 14, USS Ronald Reagan, along with the USS Chancellorsville (CG 62), USS Curtis Wlibur (DDG 54), USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) and USS Stethem (DDG 63), participated in a photo exercise (PHOTOEX) with the ROKS Sejong the Great (DDG 991), ROKS Choe Yeong (DDH 981), ROKS Gyeonggi (FFG 812), ROKS Jeju (FF 958) and two Pohang-class corvettes, after a four-day bilateral training exercise Invincible Spirit in the waters of the Korean Peninsula.

October 16, The Ronald Reagan moored at Berth 1 in Busan Naval Base, Republic of Korea, for a five-day port visit.

October 30, The Ronald Reagan CSG-5 commenced its participation in ANNUALEX 28G, the maritime component of the biennial exercise Keen Sword 2017, with the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF), north and east off Okinawa, Japan.

November 11, USS Ronald Reagan, along with the USS Chancellorsville, USS Shiloh (CG 67), USS Barry (DDG 52) and USS Chicago (SSN 721), participated in a PHOTOEX with the JS Izumo (DDH 183), JS Kurama (DDH 144), JS Ashigara (DDG 178), JS Yamagiri (DD 152), JS Akizuki (DD 115), JS Souryu (SS 501) and JS Oumi (AOE 426).

From November 18-19, the Ronald Reagan conducted ammunition offload with the USNS Charles Drew (T-AKE 10).

November 21, USS Ronald Reagan moored at Berth 12, Fleet Activities Yokosuka following an 11-week patrol.

January 10, 2017 USS Ronald Reagan commenced a four-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) while moored at Berth 12 Underway for sea trials and ammo onload with the USNS Charles Drew from May 7-12.

May 16, USS Ronald Reagan departed Yokosuka for a Summer Patrol after a one-day delay due to an "unspecified material issue."

May 22, The Ronald Reagan completed flight deck certification and CQ with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5, while underway in the northern Philippine Sea.

May 31, USS Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 5 transited the Tsugaru Strait westbound Participated in a photo exercise (PHOTOEX) with the USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) CSG-1 and Japan Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF) ships, as a "show of force" in the Sea of Japan, on June 1 Transited the Korean Strait southbound on June ? Transited the Luzon Strait westbound on June 12.

From June 13-15, the Ronald Reagan CSG participated in a passing exercise (PASSEX) with the JS Izumo and JS Sazanami (DD 113), while transiting the South China Sea westbound.

June 17, CVN 76 moored at Berth 3/4, RSS Singapura (The ex-Changi Naval Base) for a four-day liberty port visit to Singapore.

July 8, USS Ronald Reagan commenced its participation in a biennial joint exercise Talisman Sabre 2017, while underway in the Coral Sea, off the coast of Queensland, Australia.

July 11, An MV-22B Osprey, assigned to the "Dragons" of Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 265 (Reinforced) and currently embarked on the USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), landed on board the Reagan for the first time.

July 23, USS Ronald Reagan moored at Grain Wharf in Port of Brisbane, Australia, for a five-day liberty visit.

August 9, USS Ronald Reagan moored at Berth 12, Fleet Activities Yokosuka following a 12-week patrol.

September 8, USS Ronald Reagan departed Yokosuka for a routine Fall Patrol.

September 12, The Ronald Reagan completed a three-day Carrier Qualifications (CQ), with the CVW-5, while underway in the waters south of Japan Commenced a two-week bilateral training exercises, with the JS Ise (DDH 182), JS Sazanami (DD 113) and JS Akebono (DD 108), on Sept. 14.

September 15, Cmdr. Shane P. Tanner relieved Cmdr. Daniel R. Prochazka as CO of the "Tigertails" of Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 125, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony in the Philippine Sea.

September 24, Cmdr. Alex L. Hampton relieved Cmdr. Daniel D. Cochran as CO of the "Royal Maces" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 27, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony in the Philippine Sea.

September 29, USS Ronald Reagan, along with the USS Chafee (DDG 90), transited the Luzon Strait westbound Anchored at WA #2 in Victoria Harbour for a liberty port visit to Hong Kong from Oct. 2-6 Transited the Luzon Strait eastbound, escorted by JS Shimakaze (DDG 172), on Oct. 7.

October 18, USS Ronald Reagan, along with the USS Stethem (DDG 63), participated in a PHOTOEX with the ROKS Sejong the Great (DDG 991), ROKS Yang Manchun (DDH 973), ROKS Munmu the Great (DDH 976), ROKS Kang Won (DD 922), ROKS Sokcho (PCC 778) and ROKS Gwangmyeong (PCC 782), at the start of a three-day Maritime Counter Special Operations exercise (MCSOFEX), in the waters east of the Korean Peninsula.

October 21, The Ronald Reagan moored at Berth 1 in Busan Naval Base, Republic of Korea, for a five-day port visit.

November 12, USS Ronald Reagan CSG participated in two PHOTOEXs with the USS Nimitz (CVN 68) CSG, USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) CSG, JS Ise (DDH 182), JS Inazuma (DD 105), JS Makinami (DD 112) and six ROK Navy ships, as a "show of force" in the Sea of Japan.

November 16, USS Ronald Reagan CSG commenced a 10-day Annual Exercise (ANNUALEX) 28G, with the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF), in the waters around Okinawa, Japan.

November 22, A C2-A Greyhound (Bureau #162175), assigned to the "Providers" of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 30 Det. 5, crashed approximately 90 miles northwest of Okinotorishima Atoll, at about 2:45 p.m. JST, while en route from MCAS Iwakuni to CVN 76. Eight personnel aboard have been rescued. Lt. Steven Combs, Aviation Boatswain&rsquos Mate Airman Matthew Chialastri and Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Apprentice Bryan Grosso are lost at sea.

From December 1-2, the Ronald Reagan conducted ammunition offload with the USNS Charles Drew (T-AKE 10).

December 4, USS Ronald Reagan moored at Berth 12, Fleet Activities Yokosuka after completing a three-month patrol.

May 11, 2018 The Ronald Reagan departed Yokosuka for sea trials following a four-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) Conducted ammo onload with the USNS Cesar Chavez (T-AKE 14) from May 14-15 Returned home on May 17.

May 29, USS Ronald Reagan departed Yokosuka for a Summer Patrol after a one-day delay due to an "unspecified material issue."

June 3, The Ronald Reagan completed flight deck certification and CQ, with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5, while underway in the Philippine Sea.

June 11, USS Ronald Reagan CSG-5 commenced its participation in a trilateral exercise Malabar 2018, with the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) and Indian Navy ships, in the Guam Op. Area Participated in a photo exercise (PHOTOEX), east of Saipan, on June 15 Entered the South China Sea on June 24.

June 26, USS Ronald Reagan anchored off the coast of Manila, Republic of the Philippines, for a four-day port visit Transited the Luzon Strait eastbound on July ?.

From July 6-7, the Ronald Reagan participated in an air defense exercise (ADEX), with the USS Antietam (CG 54) and USS Milius (DDG 69), while underway east of Okinawa, Japan.

July 18, Rear Adm. Karl O. Thomas relieved Rear Adm. Marc H. Dalton as Commander, Task Force (CTF) 70 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the CVN 76, while underway in the Philippine Sea.

July 24, USS Ronald Reagan moored at Berth 12 on Fleet Activities Yokosuka following a two-month patrol.

July 27, The Ronald Reagan emergency sortied from Yokosuka due to approaching Typhoon Jongdari Returned home on July 30 Held an "Open House," in conjunction with the 42nd annual Friendship Day festival, on Aug. 4 Emergency sortied again due to approaching Typhoon Shanshan on Aug. 7 Moored at Berth 12 on Aug. 10.

August 14, USS Ronald Reagan departed Fleet Activities Yokosuka for a routine Fall Patrol.

August 31, The Ronald Reagan participated in a PHOTOEX with the USS Antietam, USS Milius, JS Kaga (DDH 184), JS Suzutsuki (DD 117) and JS Inazuma (DD 105), as a "show of force" in the South China Sea.

September 10, Capt. Patrick J. Hannifin relieved Capt. Michael P. Donnelly as the 8th CO of Ronald Reagan during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship, while underway in the Philippine Sea.

September 17, USS Ronald Reagan CSG-5 participated in a PHOTOEX at the start of a biennial field training exercise Valiant Shield 2018, in the Guam Op. Area.

September 24, The Ronald Reagan moored at Kilo Wharf in Apra Harbor, Guam, for an extended eight-day liberty port visit.

October 11, USS Ronald Reagan, along with the USS Chancellorsville (CG 62) and USS Benfold (DDG 65), participated in a pass-in-review, while underway off the south coast of Jeju Island, as part of the Republic of Korea (ROK) International Fleet Review (IFR) 2018.

October 12, CVN 76 moored at Pier A, Jeju Civilian-Military Complex on Jeju Island, Republic of Korea, for a four-day port call.

October 19, An MH-60R Sea Hawk, assigned to the "Saberhawks" of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 77, made an emergency landing and crashed on the ship&rsquos flight deck, shortly after takeoff at 9 a.m. local time, while the Reagan was underway in the Philippine Sea. Some servicemembers were medically evacuated to a hospital in the Philippines.

October 29, USS Ronald Reagan CSG commenced its participation in ANNUALEX 30G, the maritime component of the biennial exercise Keen Sword 2019, with the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) ships, north and east off Okinawa, Japan Participated in a PHOTOEX on Nov. 8.

November 12, An F/A-18F Super Hornet, assigned to the "Diamondbacks" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 102, crashed in the Philippine Sea around 11.45 a.m., approximately 150 miles southeast of Naha, Okinawa Prefecture, after experienced a mechanical issue. Both crewmembers ejected safely and were recovered.

November 16, USS Ronald Reagan, along with the USS Chancellorsville, participated in a PHOTOEX with the USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) CSG-3, as a "show of force" in the Philippine Sea.

November 21, The Ronald Reagan anchored at Western Anchorage (WA) #2 in Victoria Harbour for a four-day liberty port visit to Hong Kong to celebrate the Thanksgiving Day.

December 5, USS Ronald Reagan moored at Berth 12 on Fleet Activities Yokosuka after completing a nearly four-month patrol.

May 17, 2019 The Ronald Reagan returned to homeport after a five-day underway for sea trials, following a four-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA).

May 22, USS Ronald Reagan departed Yokosuka for a routine Summer Patrol in the U.S. 7th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AoR).

June 11, The Ronald Reagan participated in a PHOTOEX with the JS Izumo (DDH 183), JS Murasame (DD 101) and JS Akebono (DD 108), while underway in the South China Sea Transited the Luzon Strait eastbound on June 14 Transited westbound again on June 17.

June 18, USS Ronald Reagan conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Amelia Earhart (T-AKE 6) and USNS Walter S. Diehl (T-AO 193), while underway off the northwest coast of Philippines Conducted replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Matthew Perry (T-AKE 9) on June 27 Transited the Luzon Strait eastbound on June 28.?

July 3, Cmdr. Bryan M. Haney relieved Cmdr. Luke H. Davis as CO of the "Shadowhawks" of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 141 during an aerial change-of-command ceremony, while underway in the Coral Sea.

July 5, USS Ronald Reagan moored at Grain Wharf in Port of Brisbane, Australia, for a five-day visit before participating in a biennial exercise Talisman Sabre 2019 Conducted replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Matthew Perry, while underway in the Coral Sea, on July 21.

August 2, Capt. Michael A. Rovenolt relieved Capt. Forrest O. Young as Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5 during an aerial change-of-command ceremony, while underway in the Philippine Sea.

August 7, USS Ronald Reagan anchored approximately 6 n.m. off the coast of Manila, Republic of the Philippines, for a four-day port visit Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS John Ericsson (T-AO 194), while underway in the Philippine Sea, on Aug. 13 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Richard E. Byrd (T-AKE 4) on Aug. 14.

August 17, Capt. Michael Rovenolt, CO of the CVW-5, completed his 1,000th arrested landing aboard the aircraft carrier with the trap of an F/A-18E Super Hornet, assigned to the "Royal Maces" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 27.

August 24, USS Ronald Reagan moored at Berth 12 on Fleet Activities Yokosuka following a three-month patrol Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on Aug. 25.

September 14, USS Ronald Reagan departed Fleet Activities Yokosuka for a routine Fall Patrol Conducted Carrier Qualifications (CQ) with the CVW-5, off the coast of Shikoku, from Sept. 15-19.

September 20, Capt. Steven H. DeMoss relieved Capt. Jonathan C. Duffy as Commander, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 15 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Reagan, while underway off the south coast of Japan.

September 23, USS Ronald Reagan, along with the USS Chancellorsville (CG 62), entered the South China Sea after transiting the Luzon Strait westbound Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS John Ericsson and USNS Carl Brashear (T-AKE 7) on Sept. 25.

September 29, Rear Adm. George M. Wikoff relieved Rear Adm. Karl O. Thomas as Commander, Task Force (CTF) 70 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Reagan.

October 6, USS Ronald Reagan participated in a PHOTOEX with the USS Boxer (LHD 4), USS Antietam (CG 54), USS Chancellorsville and USS Wayne E. Meyer (DDG 108), while underway as a "show of force" in the South China Sea Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Carl Brashear on Oct. 14.

October 17, USS Ronald Reagan moored at Berth 3/4, RSS Singapura for a four-day liberty port visit to Singapore Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Carl Brashear, while underway in the Philippine Sea, on Oct. 28 Conducted ammo offload from Oct. 30-31.

November 2, USS Ronald Reagan moored at Berth 12 on Fleet Activities Yokosuka following a seven-week patrol.

May 5, 2020 The Ronald Regan departed homeport for sea trials, following a five-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) Conducted ammo onload with the USNS Carl Brashear (T-AKE 7) from May 8-10 Brief stop in Kaneda Wan on May 14 Moored at Berth 12 on May 15 Underway again on May 21.

May 22, The Ronald Reagan conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Tippecanoe (T-AO 199) Brief stop in Sagami Wan on May 23 Conducted ammo onload with the USNS Carl Brashear, while underway east of Okinawa, on May 28 Returned home on on June 5.

June 8, USS Ronald Reagan departed Fleet Activities Yokosuka for a scheduled patrol in the U.S. 7th Fleet AoR.

June 12, The Ronald Reagan conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Alan Shepard (T-AKE 3), while underway in the Philippine Sea Conducted a replenishment-at-sea again on June 24 Transited the San Bernardino Strait southbound on July 3.

July 6, USS Ronald Reagan, along with the USS Antietam and USS Mustin (DDG 89), participated in a PHOTOEX with the USS Nimitz (CVN 68), USS Princeton (CG 59) and USS Ralph Johnson (DDG 114), while underway as a "show of force" in the South China Sea Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Cesar Chavez (T-AKE 14) on July 7 Transited the Lombok Strait southbound on July 1? Transited the Sunda Strait northbound on July 15.?

July 18, The Ronald Reagan conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Richard E. Byrd (T-AKE 4), while underway in the South China Sea Transited the Balabac Strait eastbound on July 19 Transited the Surigao Strait northbound on July 20.

July 21, USS Ronald Reagan CSG participated in a PHOTOEX with the JS Teruzuki (DD 116), HMAS Canberra (L02), HMAS Hobart (DDG 39), HMAS Arunta (FFH 151), HMAS Stuart (FFH 153) and HMAS Sirius (O 266), while underway in the Philippine Sea Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Pecos (T-AO 197) on July 22.

July 28, The Ronald Reagan CSG is currently conducting operations in the East China Sea, off the southwest coast of Japan Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Washington Chambers (T-AKE 11) on July 31 Moored at Berth 12, Fleet Activities Yokosuka for a brief stop on Aug. 1 Transited the Tsugaru Strait westbound on Aug. 6 Transited the Korean Strait southbound on Aug. 8 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Alan Shepard, while underway north of Okinawa, on Aug. 10.

August 11, Cmdr. Joseph J. Hubley relieved Cmdr. Brent H. Jaquith as CO of the "Royal Maces" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 27, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

August 14, USS Ronald Reagan, along with the USS Rafael Peralta (DDG 115), transited the Luzon Strait westbound Transited eastbound on Aug. 15 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS John Ericsson (T-AO 194) on Aug. 16.

August 20, Cmdr. Joshua M. Ales relieved Cmdr. Bryan M. Haney as CO of the "Shadowhawks" of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 141 during an aerial change-of-command ceremony, while underway in the Philippine Sea.

August 22, USS Ronald Reagan moored at Kilo Wharf in Apra Harbor, Guam, for a four-day liberty port visit Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Alan Shepard (T-AKE 3), while underway in the Philippine Sea, on Sept. 1 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS John Ericsson (T-AO 194) on Sept. 5 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USS Mustin on Sept. 7.

September 10, The Ronald Reagan moored at Berth 12 on Fleet Activities Yokosuka for a one-day port call Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Alan Shepard and USNS Tippecanoe on Sept. 13.

September 19, Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5 participated in a sinking exercise (SINKEX) of the ex-USS Curts (FFG 38), off the northeast coast of Guam, as part of a biennial field training exercise Valiant Shield 2020.

September 22, USS Ronald Reagan conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Alan Shepard and USNS Tippecanoe Participated in a PHOTOEX, while underway off the east coast of Guam, on Sept. 25 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea again on Sept. 28.

October 1, Capt. Frederick C. Goldhammer relieved Capt. Patrick J. Hannifin as the 9th CO of CVN 76 during a short ceremony in the ship's pilot house, while underway in the Philippine Sea.

October 3, USS Ronald Reagan conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Pecos, while underway in the Philippine Sea Transited the Balabac Strait westbound on Oct. 6 Transited the Strait of Singapore on Oct. 8 Transited the Malacca Strait northbound from Oct. 8-9 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Carl Brashear (T-AKE 7) on Oct. 10 Transited southbound from Oct. 11-12 Transited the Strait of Singapore eastbound on Oct. 12.

October 14, The Ronald Reagan conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Alan Shepard, while underway in the South China Sea Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Pecos on Oct. 18 Transited the Luzon Strait eastbound on Oct. 19 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Tippecanoe (T-AO 199), while underway in the Philippine Sea, on Oct. 25.

October 26, USS Ronald Reagan participated in PHOTOEX with the USS Shiloh (CG 67), USS Barry (DDG 52), JS Kaga (DDH 184), JS Ikazuchi (DD 107), JS Makinami (DD 112), JS Fuyuzuki (DD 118), JS Shiranui (DD 120), JS Yamagiri (DD 152), JS Amagiri (DD 154), JS Sawagiri (DD 157), JS Shimakaze (DDG 172), JS Ashigara (DDG 178), HMCS Winnipeg (FFH 338), USNS Tippecanoe and JS Mashu (AOE 425), commencing the biennial field training exercise Keen Sword 21 in the waters south of Japan.

October 27, Cmdr. Daniel O'Hara relieved Cmdr. Harry C. Evans, III as CO of the "Diamondbacks" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 102, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

November 5, Rear Adm. William C. Pennington, Jr., relieved Rear Adm. George M. Wikoff as Commander, Task Force (CTF) 70 during a brief ceremony aboard the Reagan.

November 6, Capt. Adrian T. Calder relieved Capt. Michael A. Rovenolt as Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5 during an aerial change-of-command ceremony, while underway in the Philippine Sea.

From November 12-13, the Ronald Reagan conducted ammo offload with the USNS Alan Shepard.

November 14, USS Ronald Reagan moored at Berth 12 on Fleet Activities Yokosuka following a five-month patrol.

May 11, 2021 USS Ronald Reagan departed homeport for sea trials following a five-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) Conducted ammo onload with the USNS Amelia Earhart (T-AKE 6) from May 14-15 Moored at Berth 12 on May 16.

May 19, USS Ronald Reagan departed Yokosuka for a scheduled deployment in the U.S. 5th and 7th Fleet AoR.

May 25, The Ronald Reagan completed flight deck certification and CQ with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5, while underway in the Philippine Sea Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Pecos (T-AO 197) and USNS Charles Drew (T-AKE 10) on May 27 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Rappahannock (T-AO 204), while underway east of Okinawa, on June 3 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Amelia Earhart on June 13.

June 14, The Ronald Reagan transited the Luzon Strait westbound Participated in a PHOTOEX with the RSS Intrepid (FFS 69) on June 17 Transited the Strait of Singapore on June 18.


USS Hornet prior to commissioning - History

History of the USS Indiana

This next-generation attack submarine will provide the Navy with the capabilities required to maintain the nation’s undersea supremacy well into the 21st century. Virginia-class submarines will have enhanced stealth, sophisticated surveillance capabilities, and special warfare enhancements that will enable them to meet the Navy’s multi-mission requirements.

The future USS Indiana will have the capability to attack targets ashore with highly accurate Tomahawk cruise missiles and conduct covert long-term surveillance of land area, littoral waters or other sea-based forces. Other missions include anti-submarine and anti-ship warfare mine delivery and minefield mapping. It is also designed for special forces delivery and support.

SSN 789 will be built at Huntington Ingalls Industries-Newport News Shipbuilding in Newport News, Va., will be 7,800-tons and 377 feet in length, have a beam of 34 feet and operate at more than 25 knots submerged. It is designed with a reactor plant that will not require refueling during the planned life of the ship, reducing lifecycle costs while increasing underway time.

Virginia-class submarines are built under a unique teaming arrangement between General Dynamics Electric Boat and Huntington Ingalls Industries-Newport News.

USS Indiana BB 58

The third battleship to be named in honor of the State of Indiana was laid down on 20 November 1939 at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company Newport News, Virginia. Two years and a day later 20 November 1941 the vessel was launched in a brilliant pre-war ceremony with Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox giving the keynote address.Serving as sponsor for the new battleship was Mrs. Lewis C. Robbins, daughter of Indiana's Governor, Henry F. Schricker.

While INDIANA was being fitted out, the Japanese struck their treacherous blow at Pearl Harbor (7 December 1941), which temporarily eliminated almost all of the U.S. Navy's heavy striking power. The emergency was at hand! USS INDIANA s completion was hurried even more, and on 30 April 1942 she was commissioned with Captain Aaron Stanton Merrill, USN, as her first commanding officer. From her foremast fluttered the old National Ensign that BB-1 had flown when she steamed into battle at Santiago, Cuba during the Spanish-American War.

When commissioned the second of the South Dakota Class battleships displaced 35,000 tons was 680' in length had a beam of 108'2" drew 29'3" of water could make 27 knots of speed was manned by 2,109 officers and men was armed with 9 16" guns, 20 5" guns, 24 40 mm guns (later increased to 48) and 16 20 mm guns (later increased to 52) could carry 7,340 tons of fuel oil, 188 tons of diesel oil, 22 tons of gasoline, 341 tons of reserve feed water, and 439 tons of potable water and had an endurance of 17,450 nautical miles at a cruising speed of 15 knots or 6,400 nautical miles at a speed at 25 knots.

The Japanese had quickly advanced through the Philippines, other Pacific islands, and in Asia, expanding their ill-fated empire, while the United States steadily recovered. During this period INDIANA had her outfitting and arming completed and conducted her shakedown cruise in the Casco Bay, Maine area. Gunnery exercises were among the most important features of the intensive training with every gun mount, from the 16-inch rifles of the main batteries to the 20mm mounts of the anti-aircraft guns being given considerable workout.

Fully laden with ammunition and supplies, USS INDIANA churned out of Hampton Roads, Virginia on 9 November 1942 enroute to Tongatabu Island via the Panama Canal. The vessel dropped anchor in Nukualofa Harbor, Tongatabu, Tonga Islands and reported for duty with the Pacific Fleet on 28 November, joining Rear Admiral Lee's Carrier Screenig Force 28. For the next 11 months, Indiana helped protect carriers Enterprise and Saratoga, then supporting American advances in the Solomons. At this time the U.S. Navy was at a low in the Pacific with only the battleships USS WASHINGTON, USS SOUTH DAKOTA, and now USS INDIANA, along with the aircraft carriers USS SARATOGA and USS ENTERPRISE carrying the burden of the Pacific war.

These major ships, plus a few cruisers and destroyers protected the American landings on Guadalcanal. There was never a battle for the INDIANA group, only a constant threat of one, with the Jap Fleet feinting and dodging, but never clashing with this group. Earlier in this campaign, however, the enemy had struck another hard blow. A group of Jap cruisers and destroyers approached Guadalcanal undetected, and had smashed an Allied cruiser force there, sinking HMAS CANBERRA, USS ASTORIA, USS QUINCY, and USS VINCENNES, in what is now know as the First Battle of Savo Island.

INDIANA supported the Rennell Island operation on 29-30 January 1943 and from February to May 1943 she operated from Noumea, New Caledonia, guarding against the Japanese threat in the South Pacific and engaging in training exercises. During June and part of July the ship operated with Task Group 36.3 in support of the New Georgia campaign..

During this period, the addition of USS MASSACHUSETTS and USS ALABAMA from the Atlantic USS NORTH CAROLINA from Pearl Harbor, and the first of the new aircraft carriers, culminated in the forming of Task Force 58. INDIANA departed from Noumea on 31 July 1943, enroute to Pearl Harbor, arriving there on 9 August. Here Task Force 58 prepared for the Marcus Island raid. Departing Pearl Harbor on 21 August, the force with the Carriers Yorktown, Essex, and Independence launched the Marcus Island raid on the 31st. Following this raid INDIANA returned to Pearl Harbor, where she was drydocked for 16 days.

On 21 October 1943 she left Pearl Harbor with the support forces designated for the invasion of the Gilbert Islands, arriving in the Fiji Islands on 07 November 1943.

Four days later, however, the battleship was again underway, with rear Admiral Lee now Commander, Battleships, Pacific, in company with other units of BatDivs 8 and 9. On the 16th, the battlewagons and their screens joined. Rear Admiral C. A. "Baldy" Pownall's TG 50.1, Rear Admiral Pownall flying his two-starred flag in Yorktown (CV-10), the namesake of the carrier lost at Midway. The combined force then proceeded toward the Gilbert Islands to join in the daily bombings of Japanese positions in the Gilberts and Marshalls- softening them up for impending assault. On the 19th, the planes from TG 50.1 attacked Mili and Jaluit in the Marshalls, continuing those strikes through 20 November, the day upon which Navy, Marine, and Army forces landed on Tarawa and Makin in the Gilberts. On the 22d, the task group sent its planes against Mili in successive waves subsequently, the group steamed to operate north of Makin.

It was at Tarawa that she got her baptism of fire. She was with the northern group of our forces, near Makin Island, when enemy torpedo bombers from the Marshalls attacked. They came in at dusk from the east, leaving the ships of the task force silhouetted against the western sun, and against flares that other Japs had dropped. The torpedo planes came in low, just off the water, with INDIANA s guns sending up a terrific barrage. She made her first kill when one of the enemy planes made the mistake of coming too close to her.

Indiana rendezvoused with other carrier groups that composed TF 50 on 25 November and, during the reorganization that followed, was assigned to TG 50.4, the fast carrier task group under the command of Rear Admiral Frederick C. "Ted" Sherman. The carriers comprising the core of the group were Bunker Hill (CV-17) and Monterey (CVL-26) the battleships screening them were Alabama (BB-60), South Dakota (BB-57) in addition to the the Indiana. Eight destroyers rounded out the screen.

The group operated north of Makin, providing air, surface, and antisubmarine protection for the unfolding unloading operations at Makin, effective on 26 November. Enemy planes attacked the group on the 27th and 28th but were driven off without inflicting any damage on the fast carrier task forces.

As the Gilbert Islands campaign drew to a close, TG 50.8 was formed on 6 December 1943, under Rear Admiral Lee, in Washington. Other ships of that group included North Carolina (BB-55), Massachusetts (BB-59), Indiana (BB-58), South Dakota (BB-57), and Alabama (BB-60) and the Fleet carriers Bunker Hill and Monterey. Eleven destroyers screened the heavy ships. The group first steamed south and west of Ocean Island to take position for the scheduled air and surface bombardment of the island of Nauru, the rich little phosphate island the Japs had stolen from the British. Before dawn on 8 December, the carriers launched their strike groups while the bombardment force formed in column 135 rounds of 16-inch fire from the six battleships fell on the enemy installations on Nauru and, upon completion of the shelling, the battleships secondary batteries took their turn two planes from each battleship spotted the fall of shot. After a further period of air strikes had been flown off against Nauru, the task group sailed for Efate, where they arrived on 12 December. On that day, due to a change in the highest command echelons, TF 57 became TF 37.

On 19 January 1944 the battleship, along with the rest of the task group, put to sea to make rendezvous with elements of TF 58, the fast carrier task force under the overall command of Vice Admiral Marc A. "Pete" Mitscher. Becoming part of TG 58.1, Indiana screened the fast carriers in her group as they launched air strikes on Taroa and Kwajalein in the waning days of January 1944. Indiana, together with Massachusetts and Washington left the formation with four destroyers as screen and shelled Kwajalein Atoll on the 30th. Further air strikes followed the next day.

The only serious damage to the Indiana during lengthy operations with the fast carrier task force resulted from a collision with the Battleship Washington during the Marshall Islands campaign, when the Indiana turned in front of the Washington during darken-ship conditions while maneuvering prior to morning refueling operations. At 0429 on 01 Feb 1944, the Washington hit the Indiana on the starboard quarter at frame 107 at an angle of about 26 degrees. Damage to the Indiana extended down from the main deck to the turn of the bilge through the three outer shells, aft to frame 142, and on the main deck from frame 103 to frame 165. A total of 14 voids were flooded and 13 fuel tanks damaged. The starboard outboard shaft was damaged beyond repair and the inboard screw on the starboard side was damaged. Power and degaussing cables were severed, and severe structural damage to interior longitudinal bulkheads within the side protective system extended from frame 106 to 130. Shell plating was dished in between the second and third decks and severely ruptured above the second deck. The starboard range-finder hood and the range finder on the after main-battery turret were damaged, two 40 mm quadruple mounts and fourteen 20 mm single mounts were destroyed, and two 20 mm mounts were damaged. The starboard catapult and an OS2U-3 seaplane were lost. The resulting starboard list was corrected by flooding port voids. Three men were killed and one was injured. Both ships, escorted by four destroyers, sailed to Majuro Lagoon at six knots, arriving on 02 Feb for temporary repairs.When morning came the ship slipped into Majuro Lagoon, which had been taken from the Japanese just 48 hours before. After temporary repairs had been made, she stood out of the lagoon on 7 February, enroute to Pearl Harbor. INDIANA limped to Pearl Harbor, arriving there on the 13th and she went into the Navy Yard for repairs.

The damage sustained by the Indiana occurred at the most vulnerable location within the armored citadel length. Indeed, a detailed vulnerability study conducted early in 1945 concluded that, if the unprotected stern were riddled, flooding the third deck area between bulkheads 113 and 128 ½ would probably result in a South Dakota-class battleship sinking by the stern. This is precisely the area were the Indiana was hit by the Washington. In this instance the Indiana's holding bulkhead remained intact and the ship's longitudinal stability was not jeopardized, However, it appears that a very similar collision, involving damage to the stern as well as this critical compartment, possibly would have been sufficient to cause the ship to sink.

Repairs completed Indiana rejoined famed Task Force 58 for the Truk raid 29-30 April 1944 and bombarded Ponape Island 01 May. In June the battlewagon proceeded to the Marianas with a giant American fleet for the invasion of that strategic group. Indiana supported the air strikes pummeling enemy defenses in the Marianas on the islands of Saipan, Tinian, Guam, Rota, and Pagan. Task Force 58's fliers also attacked twice and damaged a Japanese convoy in the vicinity on 12 June. The following day, Vice Admiral Lee's battleship-destroyer task group was detached from the main body of the force and conducted shore bombardment against enemy installations on Saipan and Tinian. Relieved on the 14th by two task groups under Rear Admirals J. B. Oldendorf and W. L. Ainsworth, Vice Admiral Lee's group retired momentarily. On 16 June, Admiral Mitscher's TF 58 planes bombed Japanese installations on Iwo Jima in the Volcano Islands and Chichi Jima and Haha Jima in the Bonins. Meanwhile, marines landed on Saipan under cover of intensive naval gunfire and carrier-based planes. That same day, Admiral Jisaburo Ozawa, commanding the main body of the Japanese Fleet, was ordered to attack and destroy the invasion force in the Marianas. The departure of his carrier group, however, came under the scrutiny of the submarine Redfin (SS-272), as it left Tawi Tawi, the westernmost island in the Sulu Archipelago. Flying Fish (SS-229) also sighted Ozawa's force as it entered the Philippine Sea. Cavalla (SS-244) radioed a contact report on an enemy refueling group on 16 June and continued tracking it as it headed for the Marianas. She again sighted Japanese Combined Fleet units on 18 June.

Admiral Raymond A. Spruance, commanding the 5th Fleet, had meanwhile learned of the Japanese movement and accordingly issued his battle plan. Vice Admiral Lee's force formed a protective screen around the vital fleet carriers. Washington, six other battleships, four heavy cruisers, and 14 destroyers deployed to cover the flattops on 19 June, the ships came under attack from Japanese carrier-based and land-based planes as the Battle of the Philippine Sea commenced. On 19 June the deluge came, with Task Force 58 under air attack almost continuously. Each ship was sending up a seemingly impenetrable curtain of anti-aircraft fire, but the Japs came on. INDIANA's gunners shot the wing off an enemy plane coming in on the ship from her port quarter and it plunged into the sea near her.

SOUTH DAKOTA took a bomb hit on her superstructure and SAN FRANCISCO was smoking from a near miss. However, the Japs were paying a terrific price as plane after plane plunged into the ocean from the task forces combined fire and the combat air patrols.

An enemy torpedo plane came on through INDIANA s concentrated fire and dropped a torpedo, which looked like a sure hit on her starboard side. The plane was downed by the ship s guns but the torpedo came on. Quick1y, INDIANA s guns opened up on the torpedo, which exploded only 50 yards from her side.

Another Jap came too close to INDIANA's accurate fire and went down before her guns. Just after noon, an enemy plane dropped a bomb or torpedo which exploded in her wake. Her gunner s then shot the plane s tail off and it spiraled into the sea. Almost at the samc time, another Jap approached on the starboard beam. When it was 100 yards off, It caught fire, swerved up, then dived down and crashed into the battleship s side. Debris scattered over INDIANA s decks, but the only result of this crash was a small dent in the ship's plating.

Following another bomb explosion astern, no other enemy planes penetrated the task force s fighter cover, which shot down one entire raid of 15 enemy planes. There were only five casualties aboard, but all were minor shrapnell wounds.

The tremendous firepower of the screen, however, together with the aggressive combat air patrols flown from the American carriers, proved too much for even the aggressive Japanese. The heavy loss of Japanese aircraft, sometimes referred to as the "Marianas Turkey Shoot," caused serious losses in the Japanese naval air arm. During four massive raids, the enemy launched 373 planes-only 130 returned. In addition, 50 land-based bombers from Guam fell in flames. Over 930 American carrier planes were involved in the aerial action their losses amounted to comparatively few: 29 shot down and six lost operationally without the loss of a single ship in Mitscher's task force.

Only a few of the enemy planes managed to get through the barrage of flak and fighters, one scoring a direct hit on South Dakota-killing 27 and wounding 29. A bomb burst over the flight deck of the carrier Wasp (CV-18), killing one man, wounding 12, and covering her flight deck with bits of phosphorus. Two planes dove on Bunker Hill, one scoring a near miss and the other a hit that holed an elevator, knocking out the hanger deck gasoline system temporarily killing three and wounding 79. Several fires started were promptly quenched. In addition, Minneapolis (CA-36) and the INDIANA also received slight damage.

Not only did the Japanese lose heavily in planes two of their carriers were soon on their way to the bottom-Taiho, torpedoed and sunk by Albacore (SS-218) and Shokaku, sunk by Cavalla. Admiral Ozawa, his flagship, Taiho, sunk out from under him, transferred his flag to Zuikaku. (With the sinking of Shokaku, Zuikaku became the last of the six carriers that attacked Pearl Harbor to remain afloat. The first four, Akagi, Kaga, Soryu, and Hityu, were sunk at the battle of Midway. Zuikaku will survive until sacrificed as a diversion at the battle of Leyte Gulf, 25 Oct., 1944.) As the Battle of the Philippine Sea proceeded to a close, the Japanese Mobile Fleet steamed back to its bases, defeated. Admiral Mitscher's task force meanwhile retired to cover the invasion operations proceeding in the Marianas. Indiana fueled east of that chain of islands and then continued her screening duties with TG 58.4 to the south and west of Saipan, supporting the continuing air strikes on islands in the Marianas, the strikes concentrated on Guam by that point.

On 25 July, aircraft of TG 58.4 conducted air strikes on the Palaus and on enemy shipping in the vicinity, continuing their schedule of strikes through 6 August. On that day, Indiana, with Iowa (BB-61), Washington, Alabama, the light cruiser Birmingham (CL-62), and a destroyer screen, was detached from the screen of TG 58.4, forming TG 58.7, under Vice Admiral Lee.INDIANA, steaming with Task Force 58, remained at sea for 64 days during the Marianas operation, conducting air strikes until Saipan, Guam, and Tinian were secured. The Task Group arrived at Eniwetok Atoll in the Marshalls to refuel and replenish on 11 August and remained there for almost the balance of the month. On 30 August, that group departed, headed for, first, the Admiralty Islands, and ultimately, the Palaus.

In August 1944 the battleship began operations as a unit of Task Group 38.3, bombarding the Palau's, and later the Philippines. She screened strikes on enemy shore installations 12-30 September 1944, helping to prepare for the coming invasion of Leyte.

After two years of high speed operation, INDIANA was in dire need of basic repairs. The ship put in at Manus and then steamed to Bremerton, Washington, docking at the U.S. Navy Yard on 23 October. After her overhaul had been completed, INDIANA churned out of Bremerton on 6 December 1944 enroute to Pearl Harbor.

Upon arriva1 at Pearl Harbor on 12 December 1944, the battleship conducted training exercises for nine days, and on 10 January 1945 she stood out of Pearl Harbor enroute to bombard Iwo Jima via Eniwetok and Saipan. At Saipan she was joined by three cruisers and on the 24th January the force bombarded Iwo Jima. The only opposition encountered was two enemy planes, one of which was shot down.

Anchoring at Ulithi on 26 January, Indiana rejoined Task Force 58 and on 10 February she sortied with the 5th Fleet for the Iwo Jima operation, the next step on the island road to Japan. While the U.S. Marincs landed on Iwo Jima the fleet stood between the landings and Japan, protecting them from any surprise counter-attack the enemy might plan.

On 16 February 1945, the task force approached the Japanese coast under cover of adverse weather conditions and achieved complete tactical surprise. As a result, they shot down 322 enemy planes and destroyed 177 more on the ground, Japanese shipping -- both naval and merchant -- suffered drastically, too, as did hangars and aircraft installations. Moreover, all this damage to the enemy had cost the American Navy only 49 planes.

The task force moved to Iwo Jima on 17 February to provide direct support for the landings slated to take place on that island on the 19th. It revisited Tokyo on the 25th and, the next day, hit the island of Hachino off the coast of Honshu. During these raids, besides causing heavy damage or ground facilities, the American planes sent five small vessels to the bottom and destroyed 158 planes.

On 1 March, reconnaissance planes flew over the island of Okinawa, taking last minute intelligence photographs to be used in planning the assault on that island. The next day, cruisers from TF 58 shelled Okino Daito Shima in training for the forthcoming operation. The force then retired to Ulithi for replenishment. Indiana's task force stood out of Ulithi on 14 March, bound for Japan. The mission of that group was to eliminate airborne resistance from the Japanese homeland to American forces off Okinawa. Enemy fleet units at Kure and Kobe, on southern Honshu, reeled under the impact of the explosive blows delivered by TF 58's airmen. On 18 and 19 March, from a point 100 miles southwest of Kyushu, TF 58 hit enemy airfields on that island. These devastating strikes did much to aid the ground campaign and lower Japanese morale at home. During this period she often repelled enemy suicide plane attacks as the Japanese tried desperately but vainly to stem the mounting tide of defeat the ship once destroyed three aircraft making a simultaneous attack on her.However, the Japanese drew blood during that action when kamikazes crashed into Franklin (CV-17) on the 19th and seriously damaged that fleet carrier.

That afternoon, the task force retired from Kyushu, screening the blazing and battered flattop. In doing so, the screen downed 48 attackers. At the conclusion of the operation, the force felt that it had achieved its mission of prohibiting any large-scale resistance from the air to the slated landings on Okinawa.

On the 24th, Indiana trained her 16-inch rifles on targets ashore on Okinawa. Together with the other battlewagons of the task force, she pounded Japanese positions and installations in preparation for the landings. Although fierce, Japanese resistance was doomed to fail by dwindling numbers of aircraft and trained pilots to man them. In addition, the Japanese fleet, steadily hammered by air attacks from 5th Fleet aircraft, found itself confronted by a growing, powerful, and determined enemy. On 17 April, the undaunted enemy battleship Yamato, with her 18.1-inch guns, sortied to attack the American invasion fleet off Okinawa. Met head-on by a swarm of carrier planes, Yamato, the light cruiser Yahagi, and four destroyers went to the bottom, the victims of massed air power. Never again would the Japanese fleet present a major challenge to the American fleet in the war in the Pacific.

While TF 58's planes were off dispatching Yamato and her consorts to the bottom of the South China Sea, enemy aircraft struck back at American surface units. Combat air patrols (CAP) knocked down 15 enemy planes, and ships' gunfire accounted for another three, but not before one kamikaze penetrated the CAP and screen to crash on the flight deck of the fleet carrier Hancock (CV-19). On 11 April, the "Divine Wind" renewed its efforts and only drastic maneuvers and heavy barrages of gunfire saved the task force. None of the fanatical pilots achieved any direct hits, although near-misses, close aboard, managed to cause some minor damage. Combat air patrols bagged 17 planes, and ships' gunfire accounted for an even dozen. The next day, 151 enemy aircraft committed hara-kiri into TF 58, but Indiana, bristling with 5-inch, 40-millimeter and 20- millimeter guns, together with other units of the screens for the vital carriers, kept the enemy at bay or destroyed him before he could reach his targets.

Over the days that ensued, American task force planes hit Japanese facilities and installations in the enemy's homeland. Kamikazes, redoubling their efforts, managed to crash into three carriers on successive days -- Intrepid (CV-11), Bunker Hill (CV- 17), and Enterprise (CV-6).

On 05 June the U.S. fleet off Okinawa was hit by a typhoon that damaged 33 ships, including battleships, carriers, cruisers, and destroyers. The typhoon arrived about midnight, at 0500 hours it was raining horizontally at 138 miles per hour, with a barometer reading of 28.29 inches - 986.0 millibars, and with a record roll of 26 degrees. One destroyer reported rolling badly (30 degrees), the Pittsburgh lost it's bow, the Duluth sprung a bow leak, and the Hornet the forward corners of it's flight deck. The Indiana lost steering control for 35 minutes and one main engine lost power, but she rode out the storm with only minor topside structural damage, one OS2U torn off the catapult and continued operations and sailed to San Pedro Bay, Philippines, 13 June 1945.

Indiana departed Leyte on 1 July, supporting the carriers of Task Group 38.1 which attacked the Tokyo area on the 10th. The battleship and her consorts sailed once more for Japanese home waters for carrier air strikes on the enemy's heartland. Nine days later, carrier planes from TF 38 destroyed 72 enemy aircraft on the ground and smashed industrial sites in the Tokyo area. So little was the threat from the dwindling Japanese air arm that the Americans made no attempt whatever to conceal the location of their armada which was operating off her shores with impunity. On 14 July, as part of a bombardment group, she participated in the shelling of the Kamaishi Steel Works, Kamaishi, Honshu, Japan. This was the first gunfire attack on the Japanese home islands by heavy warships. From 15 through 28 July, Indiana again supported the carriers as they launched strikes against Honshu and Hokkaido.

On the 29 July, she participated in the shore bombardment of Hamamatsu, Honshu. By that point in the war, Allied warships were able to shell the Japanese homeland almost at will. Task Force 38's planes subsequently blasted the Japanese naval base at Yokosuka, and put one of the two remaining Japanese battleships -- the former fleet flagship Nagato out of action. On 24 and 25 July, American carrier planes visited the Inland Sea region, blasting enemy sites on Honshu, Kyushu, and Shikoku. Kure then again came under attack. Six major fleet units were located there and badly damaged, marking the virtual end of Japanese sea power. Over the weeks that ensued, TF 38 continue its raids on Japanese industrial facilities, airfields, and merchant and naval shipping.

On 9 August, the Indiana again shelled Kamaishi. The battleship supported the carriers in strikes against northern Honshu on 10 August, and in the Tokyo area on the 13th and 15th. The latter was the last strike of the war for, later that day, Japan capitulated. On 30 August she assisted in landing U.S. occupation forces, including a landing force of 238 sailors and 76 marines from the complement of the Indiana, at Yokosuka Naval Base in Tokyo Bay, where the Japanese formal surrender took place on 02 September. The veteran battleship, as part of the occupying force, arrived in Tokyo Bay 05 September, three days after the formal surrender occured on board the battleship Missouri (BB-63). Nine days later the Indiana sailed for San Francisco, where she arrived 29 September the first ship back from Tokyo Bay.

On her arrival in the United States, INDIANA had steamed 234,888 mIles, consuned 36,432,000 gallons of fuel oil, and had used 77 million gallons of water since her commissioning.

For the first post-war Navy Day (27 October 1945) celebration, INDIANA remained at San Francisco, where visitors came aboard in droves to inspect the veteran battleship.

INDIANA moved to the Puget Sound Navy Yard on 31 October where she was subjected to a major overhaul. She was placed "in commission in reserve" in the Bremerton Group of the Pacific Reserve Fleet on 11 September 1946 and on 11 September 1947 her status was changed to "in service in reserve." The last of her Class to be decommissioned.

On 26 July 1954 the Chairman of the Ship Characteristics Board requested a preliminary design of BB-57 class conversions to increase speed. Examination of fast task force operations indicated that the South Dakota class was admirably suited for such major fleet service in every regard but speed. As the main-battery armament was considered greatly in excess of requirements, it was proposed to remove the after turret, thereby providing hull volume for added machinery. It was desired to increase the maximum speed to approximately 31 knots. The Bureau of Ships reported on its investigations of the proposed conversions of the South Dakota class on 14 September 1954. It was calculated that 256,000 shaft horsepower would be necessary for a speed of 31 knots. The internal location of the main side belt armor precluded the removal of the side armor. In order to obtain this massive increase in power, it would have been necessary to install a vastly improved steam propulsion plant or to utilize a plant with gas turbines for boost power, using the existing 130,000 SHP plant for normal operations. Such added power would have forced a redesign of the after hull form, in order to obtain reasonable water flow to the propellers for satisfactory propulsive efficiency, as well as to prevent vibration induced by the skegs. Furthermore, larger propellers would have been required, along with the relocation and modification of shaft bearings, skegs, struts, stern tubes, rudders, and the steering gear. Such major conversions were estimated to cost some $40,000,000 per ship, exclusive of activation expenses, and expenses related to the upgrading or repair of electronics and combat systems. The proposed conversions were abandoned.

Indiana was stricken from the Navy List 01 June 1962, sold for scrap for $418,387 on 06 Sep 1963, and scrapped in 1964.

Indiana's mast is erected at the Indiana University at Bloomington her anchor rests at Fort Wayne and other relics are on display in various museums and schools throughout the State. Teak planks from the main deck were used to construct a desk and presented to the then Governor of Indiana and has been used by all subsequent governors.


Contents

Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox and his wife, Annie Reid Knox, sponsor of Hornet, christening the ship, 30 August 1943.

The contract to build Kearsarge had been given to Newport News Shipbuilding on 9 September 1940, and her keel was laid down on 3 August 1942. The seventh Hornet (CV-8) was sunk in the Battle of Santa Cruz on 26 October 1942, and the CV-12 hull was renamed Hornet (the name Kearsarge is still stamped into her keel plate). [ citation needed ] She was launched on 30 August 1943 and commissioned on 29 November 1943. Her first commander was Captain (later Rear Admiral) Miles R. Browning.


USS Newport News CA-148

NEWPORT NEWS, Va., January, 1949
The people of NEWPORT NEWS who have built Navy warships for three wars are about to realize a life-long ambition.

Release from the Public Information Office, Fifth Naval District, Norfolk, VA. - Sunday, Jan. 23, 1949

During its 63 year history of building "good ships" the NEWPORT NEWS Shipbuilding and Drydock Company has constructed more than 100 combatant vessels for the US Navy. They were given names like the "YORKTOWN", "HORNET", "FRANKLIN", "ENTERPRISE", "RANGER", "MIDWAY", and "CORAL SEA", all aircraft carriers. Then there were the battleships, "INDIANA", "KENTUCKY", and "MISSISSIPPI". And the cruisers, "MOBILE", "BIRMINGHAM", "BOLOXI", and "ST. LOUIS". Many of these names were to become renowned for their participation in famous war actions.

All during these years the NEWPORT NEWS citizens have fervently hoped that some day they might be able to build a namesake for their city.

And so, next Saturday, January 29, at the plant of her builders, the Navy's 17,000 ton heavy cruiser, "NEWPORT NEWS", will be placed in commission as an active fighting unit of the United States Fleet. It will be an event not to be soon forgotten by the people of this shipbuilding city. The day will be a memorable milestone in the annals of the city and the shipyard. The day prior to the commissioning marks the 63rd anniversary of the founding of the Chesapeake Dry Dock and Construction Company, later to be given its present name.

The people of NEWPORT NEWS are as "proud as peacocks" of their ship and will tell you so. Yard employees from the officials right on down to the laborers have taken a particular interest and pride in her construction. They have taken special pains to see that every detail received the Navy's "4.0" rating.

As a material contribution to the ship the citizens of the community have generously donated funds with which to purchase a 459 piece Silver Service at a retail cost of $15,000. Envelopes were distributed throughout the city and in the high schools and were returned containing nickels, dimes, quarters, and larger amounts to defray the cost of the Silver Service. The City Council decided that each citizen should have some part in the purchase of the silver. Even the jeweler through whom the service was purchased agreed to furnish it at cost and the manufacturer consented to forego his customary profit.

Sponsor of the "NEWPORT NEWS" is Mrs. Homer L. Ferguson, wife of Chairman of the Board of Directors of the NEWPORT NEWS shipyard. It was also a striking coincidence that Mr. Ferguson, who guided the destinies of the shipbuilding concern for 31 years as its president, witnessed the christening of the vessel by his wife on his 74th birthday, March 6, 1947.

Not only will the cruiser NEWPORT NEWS be distinguished by the name it bears, but also it will be the largest and most powerful cruiser built by NEWPORT NEWS yard. This is particularly significant when it is considered that the NEWPORT NEWS is the 17th in a long line of cruisers constructed for the Navy. The lineage had its beginning back in 1905 with the old "WEST VIRGINIA" and includes such memorable ones as the "HOUSTON", "AUGUSTA" and "BOISE", as well as several of the "CLEVELAND" class cruisers.

The NEWPORT NEWS will be the second Naval vessel to bear the name a Virginia City. The other is the cruiser "PORTSMOUTH" named after the twin-cities of Portsmouth, Va. and New Hampshire. Another cruiser, the "ROANOKE", is scheduled to be placed in commission this spring at the New York Shipbuilding Company Camden, N.J.

Actually the first Navy ship to be called NEWPORT NEWS had very little connection with the city other than the name. It was the former Hamburg-American Line collier "Odenwald" which was built in 1903 in Flensburg, Germany. She was made a prize during World War I and acquired by the US Shipping Board in 1917. Later she was taken over by the Navy and used as a cargo vessel in the Navy Overseas Transport Service until she was stricken from the Navy list in 1924.

The colorful commissioning ceremonies will start at 2:30 p.m. and Admiral W. H. P. Blandy, USN, Commander-in Chief Atlantic and US Atlantic Fleet will be the principal speaker. High ranking Navy and Army Officers and civilian dignitaries will be on hand when J.B. Woodward, Jr., President of the NEWPORT NEWS Shipyard, officially turns the ship over to Rear Admiral Ralph O. Davis, USN, Commandant, Fifth Naval District, who will accept the vessel for the Navy.

Following an acceptance speech by Admiral Davis, he will direct Captain Roland N. Smoot, USN to place the ship in commission and take command. Admiral Blandy's address will be followed by a speech to the crew and guests by Captain Smoot.

Mayor R. Cowles Taylor of NEWPORT NEWS will then present the Silver Service to the ship on behalf of the citizens of the city.

To take command of the NEWPORT NEWS , the Navy has chosen one of its most distinguished young officers. Captain Smoot, a native of Provo City, Utah, achieved outstanding recognition for his combat service during World War II. He was awarded the Navy's highest honor, the coveted Navy Cross for action against the Japanese fleet during the Battle of Surigao Strait in the Philippine Islands as Commander of a Destroyer Squadron. For action as a destroyer squadron commander during the Okinawa campaign, Captain Smoot received a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Navy Cross. The prospective skipper of the NEWPORT NEWS also was awarded the Legion of Merit with a Gold Star, the Bronze Star Medal with two Gold Stars and the Commendation Ribbon with bronze star and the Navy Unit Commendation Ribbon.

Improved construction features learned from lessons in the recent war are embodied in the NEWPORT NEWS . The result is a larger and faster ship with greater fire power, longer cruising range, and more protection from air attack than any previous heavy cruiser.

Main armament of the ship consists of eight-inch guns mounted in triple turrets that are rapid-firing and fully automatic from ammunition handling rooms to the gun muzzles. They are a radical innovation over previous ordnance gear and even include the automatic ejection of the cartridge cases from the mounts. These guns have an estimated firepower four-times greater than previous eight-inch weapons. Even the use of powder bags has been discontinued in favor of cases in order to achieve the desired quick firing rate. Representing a drastic changeover from the rifled guns in the main batteries of other Naval ships, the NEWPORT NEWS will require no ammunition handlers in the turrets of her eight-inch batteries. The modern design of new type weapons represents ammunition handling features that were developed independently in a number of mounts both United States and foreign.

The new rapid rate of fire is made possible by extensive mechanization requiring a much greater use of electric and hydraulic control and power systems than has heretofore been used in ordnance. Pilot models have been tested through 100,000 cycles, testing exceeding that which all previous gear was subjected, to insure satisfactory performance of the large amount of special equipment. Each gun mount features a control and indicator panel which shows immediately the position of the ammunition in the entire loading system from magazine to breech and the exact location of any type of electrical failure in the system. Advantages of this type of trouble shooting are obvious.

Her secondary battery consists of 12 dual-purpose twin-mount, five-inch guns, and an antiaircraft battery of .20 dual-purpose twin-mount three-inch guns, plus a dozen 20mm automatic machine guns.

The NEWPORT NEWS will be the first vessel in the fleet to have air-conditioning in virtually all living and working compartments except the machinery spaces. The installation of the air-conditioning equipment was designed to improve the fighting efficiency of the fleet. Admittedly the ship will be more comfortable in tropical areas but the primary consideration is to improve battle effectiveness. Long periods of abnormal heat produce fatigue and exhaustion to personnel thus exposed and reduces the fighting efficiency of the crew. The air-cooling system is experimental and should it prove successful, it is likely that such equipment will be installed on all fleet units.

Extensive experiments were conducted by the Navy's Bureau of Ships and Bureau of Medicine to determine the need for air-conditioning and the technical requirements for best results. The experiments were conducted with two groups both of which worked in hot environments. One group rested in typical hot quarters while the other slept in an air-cooled compartment. It was concluded that the principle factor underlying the differences shown by the two groups was the amount of restful sleep obtained. The men in cool quarters slept better, while almost without exception the men in the "hot" group developed heat rash which disturbed their sleep and resulted in reduced efficiency.

The NEWPORT NEWS is the second of a class of "heaviest" of heavy cruisers in the world known as the Salem class. The "Des Moines", first of the class was commissioned in November of last year and the "Salem", is scheduled to be completed in early spring.

Propulsion is by geared turbines driving four screws and steam will be supplied by four oil-burning water tube boilers. The NEWPORT NEWS speed is rated in excess of 30 knots. She is 716 feet long and has a beam of 76 feet. Her complement will consist of 105 officers and 1745 enlisted men although her peacetime allowance will be somewhat less. Contract for the construction of the cruise was awarded April, 1944 and the keel was laid October 1, 1945.

Following her commissioning, the NEWPORT NEWS will hold Open House on Sunday with general visiting by the public permitted. She will leave the following day for the Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth for a fitting out period of about six weeks. Then will come an intensive training period, preliminary to the shakedown cruise in the Caribbean area. Upon completion of the shakedown, she will join the Fleet for duty. But wherever she goes and whatever she goes the people of NEWPORT NEWS will keep a watchful eye on "their" cruiser.


F/A-18C Hornet Performs Last Trap on Nimitz

PACIFIC OCEAN – The “Death Rattlers” of Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA-323) made history as they concluded the final deployment of an F/A-18C Hornet aboard an aircraft carrier Feb. 25.

The Marine Corps plans on phasing out the F/A-18C Hornet over the next several years and is replacing them with the F-35C Lightning II.

“I'm excited that just as we return from this deployment VMFA-314 at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar will begin workups in the F-35C with their carrier air wing,” said Lt. Col. Anthony “Trailer” Koehl, “Death Rattlers” executive officer. “The legacy of Marines fighting from the ship and integrating with the Navy is not ending. A quarter of their [VMFA-314] squadron ready room, to include their commanding officer, deployed with me aboard the USS Ronald Reagan and the USS Nimitz flying the F/A-18C. I'm excited for what lies ahead of them, still integrated with the Navy, now deadlier.”

Since its commissioning on Aug. 1, 1943, the “Death Rattlers” have a history of being able to execute any mission while flying any aircraft.

“In 1944, during World War II, the squadron made its first deployment in the F4U-1D Corsair to the South Pacific where it supported Operation Iceberg from Kadena Airfield in Okinawa, Japan under the command of Fleet Admiral Chester Nimitz,” said Lt.Col. William “Skull” Mitchell, “Death Rattlers” commanding officer. “During the Okinawa Campaign, VMFA-323 recorded 124 and one-half Japanese planes shot down and achieved a record high 12 aces in the squadron.”

Mitchell said in November 1985 the “Death Rattlers” deployed on the USS Coral Sea (CV-43) while assigned to CVW-13, which was the first carrier air wing to deploy with Marine F/A-18s. Nearly 35 years after their first carrier deployment in the Hornet, the squadron made history once again while deployed with CVW-17, as the last Legacy Hornet squadron to integrate with a Carrier Air Wing and on a ship honoring the Admiral the “Death Rattlers” served under during their very first deployment.

Their ability to execute has been the story of their almost 80 year history. The squadron’s success may stem from the dedication and faithfulness of its members the “Death Rattler’s” motto.

“The Death Rattlers’ motto is ‘Come to Fight, Come to Win’,” said Sgt. Gabrielle Ribeiro-Mills, assigned to the Death Rattlers. “I live it by wanting to do the very best I can with any task given to me, ensuring that the job/task is accomplished, and knowing that I gave 110%. It also makes me want to encourage and motivate others to do the same whether they're struggling to accomplish the task or lack the motivation to do so. I want to ensure that all Marines are ready to give it their all to ensure that the mission gets done and that all my Marines get done safe and sound.”

Their motto is readily apparent in each Marine’s actions as they carry out their daily tasks. It is also displayed by the lowest ranking Marine, all the way to the top.

Koehl said that the squadron embodies the legacy of former Snakes by living out their motto daily. They have a long, storied history fighting in every war the U. S. has been in, and most of the time they have been fighting from an aircraft carrier.

They live their motto out by being tactically and technically proficient in all they do, by setting high standards and holding each other accountable so that when the time comes to fight, they win.

Though the F/A-18C may be facing its sundown, the Death Rattlers have a place in the history and future of Marine Corps aviation and with Navy aircraft carriers.

“This deployment was not only my first deployment in my career, but it was also my first deployment on an aircraft carrier,” said Ribeiro-Mills. “It was a challenging yet rewarding learning experience. The best part about this deployment is the fact that my squadron and I are not only making squadron history but Marine Corps history.

“I'm absolutely honored and am very proud to share this moment with fellow my Death Rattlers of VMFA-323,” said Ribeiro-Mills. “This will be a deployment and memory I will cherish for the rest of my life.”


Watch the video: The Pacific war zone dive bombers attack USS Hornet 1943 (January 2022).