Information

Clay, Henry - History


Secretary of State, Speaker of the House

(1777-1852)

Henry Clay was born in "the Slashes," in Hanover County, Virginia. The son of a Baptist preacher, Clay began working in a grist mill, from which he acquired the nickname "mill-boy of the Slashes." At the age of 15, Clay became an assistant clerk in the chancery court of Virginia. At 20, he was licensed to practice law, and moved to Lexington, Kentucky. After acquiring a high reputation, he was elected to the US House of Representatives in 1811, and served as Speaker of the House (1811-1814, 1815-1820). Clay led the Congressional group, known as the "war hawks," which supported the US' going to war against Britain in 1812. Clay was also involved with the signing of the Treaty of Ghent, which ended the War of 1812. He was called "the great pacificator" for his attempts to bring about the "Missouri Compromise" of 1820. Clay served as Secretary of State (1825-29) under President John Quincy Adams, and was a US Senator from 1831 to 1842. After running for President unsuccessfully in both 1832 and 1844, Clay attempted to avoid a civil war by bringing about the Compromise of 1850. It was only a matter of a few years, however, before tensions would erupt and the nation would be torn apart by the Civil War. Clay did not live long enough to witness the war, however: he died in 1852.


Henry Clay

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    Henry Clay was one of the most powerful and politically significant Americans of the early 19th century. Though he was never elected president, he held enormous influence in the U.S. Congress. A part of his legacy that survives to the present day is that it was Clay who first made the position of speaker of the house one of the centers of power in Washington.

    Clay's oratorical abilities were legendary, and spectators would flock to the Capitol when it was known he would be giving a speech on the floor of the Senate. But while he was a beloved political leader to millions, Clay was also the subject of vicious political attacks and he collected many enemies over his lengthy career.

    Following a contentious Senate debate in 1838 on the perennial issue of slavery, Clay uttered perhaps his most famous quote: "I'd rather be right than be president."

    When Clay died in 1852 he was widely mourned. An elaborate traveling funeral for Clay, during which his body was taken to major cities, allowed countless Americans to participate in public mourning for someone who had made a major impact on the nation's development.


    Clay, Henry

    On June 29, 1852, Henry Clay asked his son Thomas to come and sit by his bedside. Just before the hour of noon, “The Great Compromiser” drew his last breath. At that point his life became a completed major chapter in the political history of the United States. Henry Clay had lived through and served in some political position for a half a century. No single statement would adequately cover his active public life.Clay claimed to have been cradled in the American Revolution, a claim which had some substantial fact behind it. He was born the seventh son of nine children to Reverend John and Elizabeth Hudson Clay on April 12, 1777. As a three-year-old he had seen the British troops under the notorious raider Banastre Tarleton ransack his family home.

    As a youth Clay had grown up in a rural slaveholding environment in Hanover County, Virginia, a county which had spawned Patrick Henry and other Virginia political leaders. In his political life Clay was to make some stout claim to having been a mill boy of the Slashes. More importantly his widowed mother had married Captain Henry Watkins who was able to get the adolescent Clay into Peter Tinsley’s chancery office as a clerk. Clay entered this public service in a lowly position with only a limited amount of formal education. In Tinsley’s office, and then as an amanuensis in Chancellor George Wythe’s office the young Clay developed a clear and precise angular style handwriting which remained clear until almost the moment of his death. During more than half a century Henry Clay was to produce literally thousands of handwritten letters, legal briefs, and public documents.

    Little could that youth of twenty years of age, and a newly licensed attorney to practice his profession in Virginia, have imagined on that November morning, 1797, when he set forth to find clients and fortune in Kentucky, that the expanding West would become so vital a part of his life. In Lexington, Clay presented his Virginia license to the court and was given one to practice in Kentucky. Almost immediately the young Virginian entered into the public and social life of rapidly expanding central Kentucky. Within a decade he established a reputation as a highly successful trial lawyer.

    He made a successful marriage with Lucretia Hart, the daughter of one of Kentucky’s major pioneering land families. Almost by force of environmental and family circumstances, Henry Clay was to become a major land owner, livestock breeder, and farmer. For half a century Ashland was to become not only a family home to the Clays, but also a focal agricultural center in Kentucky, and a national one in politics.

    Henry Clay began his political career in 1803 when he was elected to the Kentucky General Assembly. In that body his Jeffersonian views were pitted against the conservative federalist one of Humphrey Marshall, a fact which resulted in a somewhat comic opera duel. In 1806 Clay was employed to defend Aaron Burr, a ticklish task which he abandoned when he was appointed to the United States Senate that year at the very young age of twenty-nine years. On January 11, 1808, he was chosen Speaker of the House of Representatives, and in January 1810 he was returned to the U.S. Senate. However, in August of that year he was elected once again to the House of Representatives and served as speaker in the Twelfth, Thirteenth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and Sixteenth Congresses. Clay’s was to be a major voice in the troubled years in American-British relations from 1808-1814. He served as commissioner to the joint American-British peace negotiations in Ghent, Belgium in 1814.

    Back home after 1815, Henry Clay became involved in nearly every national issue. He opposed the Adams-D’Onis Treaty, and supported the independence of the Latin American republics. The issues, however, which thrust him into the political limelight were the Missouri Compromise, the banking issues, opposition to Andrew Jackson, and promotion of his American System. No doubt the most important of these was the negotiation of the Missouri Compromise which was fundamental in maintaining American unity, providing some kind of workable sectional policy regarding slavery expansion, and some kind of western policy. At heart Henry Clay favored the gradual abolition of slavery as demonstrated in his strong support of the American Colonization Society attempt.

    There burned deeply in the Clay psyche a yearning to be President of the United States. He made his first gamble for this office in 1824 with only a remote chance of winning. In 1832 he once again attempted to be elected president. He suffered his most disappointing loss for the office in 1844.

    At the moment Henry Clay lay dying in Washington, he must have looked back upon his career as lawyer, state representative, United States Senator, Congressman, Speaker of the House, a peace commissioner, Secretary of State, on the Missouri Compromise, the compromise tariff bill revision in 1833, his American System, the Texas question, and the Compromise of 1850, his greatest victory.

    Through the bitter raw political years in American history, Henry Clay prevailed. Even in the face of great family tragedy, he prevailed. Contemporaries branded him with numerous political epithets, but these he survived. Few American politicians could claim so many victories, or engage in so many gambles, and still claim an exalted place in political history. Perhaps Henry Clay’s greatest honor was the post mortem one he received when a great majority of American historians honored him as having been one of the greatest United States Senators. The name of Henry Clay was stamped deeply on the American political scene during his lifetime. But perhaps his true greatness has emerged since in the overflowing stream of impressive monographs and biographies of his life and achievements. In his image is reflected that of a young republic undergoing the trials and tribulations of becoming a mature, powerful nation.


    Henry Clay

    On June 29, 1852, statesman Henry Clay, known as “the Great Compromiser” for his feats of legislative reconciliation between the North and the South, died at the age of seventy-five at the Old National Hotel in Washington, D.C.

    Henry Clay, head-and-shoulders length studio portrait…. Frederick De Bourg Richards, photographer,[between 1845 and 1852]. Prints & Photographs Division

    I implore, as the best blessing which Heaven can bestow upon me upon earth, that if the direful and sad event of the dissolution of the Union shall happen, I may not survive to behold the sad and heart-rending spectacle.

    “On the Compromise Resolutions,” speech before the U.S. Senate, February 5 and 6, 1850, The Life and Speeches of Henry Clay (Littleton, Colorado: Fred B. Rothman, 1987), 2: 664.

    Born on a farm in Virginia on April 12, 1777, Clay practiced law in Virginia and Kentucky before embarking on a political career. He represented Kentucky both in the Senate and in the House of Representatives and was a guiding force in American political life. He served as Speaker of the House of Representatives (as a Democratic Republican) from 1811-20 and again from 1823-24. He advocated U.S. entry into the War of 1812 with such nationalistic fervor that he earned himself the sobriquet “War Hawk.” Clay also played a role in the negotiation of that war’s peace as one of five commissioners who drafted the Treaty of Ghent.

    Representing the state of Kentucky in the U.S. Congress, Clay eloquently promoted the “American System,” his plan to support domestic industry and agriculture (and reduce dependence on imports) through improved transportation routes, a protective tariff, and a national bank. In 1820, he negotiated the passage of the first of the three pieces of legislation that earned him the titles of the “Great Pacificator” and the “Great Compromiser.” The Missouri Compromise, the first piece of legislation, soothed the anxieties of both Southern and Northern factions by maintaining a balance between the number of states that permitted slavery and those that prohibited slavery.

    Clay was unsuccessful in his bid to become the presidential candidate of the Democratic Republican Party in 1824. He then gave his support to John Quincy Adams and when Adams won the election, he appointed Clay secretary of state. Clay again failed in his bids to become the presidential candidate of the National Republican Party in 1832 and of the Whig Party in 1844. His opposition to the annexation of Texas—because the state’s entry into the Union would have upset the balance of slave and free states—cost him the presidential election of 1844. Nonetheless, he remained a guiding force in American political life, exercising leadership in both the House and the Senate.

    Grand National Whig Banner. “Onward.” New York: Lith & Pub. by N[athaniel] Currier, 1844. Popular Graphic Arts. Prints & Photographs Division

    Currier is known to have produced at least three Whig banners for the 1844 election. This example features oval portraits, framed in laurel, of Whig presidential and vice-presidential candidates Henry Clay (left) and Theodore M. Frelinghuysen (right). “The Nation’s Choice For President & Vice President” is inscribed on a banderole below the portraits. An eagle and several American flags appear in a burst of light above the portraits, as does the campaign slogan “Justice to Harry of the West.”

    The United States Senate, A.D. 1850… P.F. Rothermel, artist R. Whitechurch, engraver Philadelphia, Pa: John M. Butler & Alfred Long, c1855. Popular Graphic Arts. Prints & Photographs Division

    The engraving depicts Henry Clay addressing the Senate. Daniel Webster is seated to the left of Clay and John C. Calhoun is to the left of the Speaker’s chair.

    A Jeffersonian Republican, Clay advocated the gradual abolition of slavery. (In his will, Clay freed the slaves of Ashland, his Kentucky plantation.) He was active in the movement to resettle freed slaves in Liberia, which was led by the American Society for Colonizing the Free People of Colour of the United States (or, American Colonization Society), of which he was a founding member.

    Clay’s efforts to balance the rights of free and slave states postponed the outbreak of the Civil War. With South Carolina’s Senator John C. Calhoun, Clay drafted his second piece of compromise legislation that enabled the passage of the 1833 tariff, thus averting the Nullification Crisis.

    The third compromise bill to which Clay lent his eloquence was the Compromise of 1850. With orators Daniel Webster and Stephen Douglas, Clay argued for tolerance among factions and for the preservation of the Union. At the end of his famous speech of February 6, 1850, Clay prayed that he would not live to see the nation torn apart by civil war.

    In an American Life Histories: Manuscripts from the Federal Writers’ Project, 1936 to 1940 interview, Mrs. William Price, a Texas pioneer, recounts stories told by her Kentuckian father about the state’s famous native son:

    It was in the year that my father came to Texas that Henry Clay made his last great speech when the Missouri Compromise again was the subject of debate, in this speech he won the name of “The Pacificator.” It was thought to be the cause of his death, the effort he put forth in his failing health. It is enough to tell you that the followers of this man honored and admired him fro [sic] his attempt in the troublesome days before the Civil War to help to hold his state in the Union.

    “Mrs. William Price.” Miss Effie Cowan, interviewer Marlin, Texas, ca. 1936-1939. American Life Histories: Manuscripts from the Federal Writers’ Project, 1936 to 1940. Manuscript Division


    Henry Clay

    Henry Clay was born into a middle-class family in Hanover County, Virginia, on April 12, 1777, the seventh of nine children. He studied law with the noted George Wythe, mentor of Thomas Jefferson and John Marshall. At age 20, Clay moved to Lexington, Kentucky and quickly established himself as a successful lawyer. His oratorical skills, friendly manner, and inclinations to engage in gambling and drinking made him immensely popular. On April 11, 1799, Henry Clay married Lucretia Hart, youngest daughter of Colonel Thomas Hart, a well-to-do land speculator and merchant. He soon developed considerable personal property and began his association with the conservative landed classes that would continue through his lifetime. Belonging to the Jeffersonian-Republican party, Clay became interested in politics in Kentucky. He supported emancipation of slaves and voiced opposition to the Alien and Sedition Acts. Elected to the Kentucky legislature in 1803, he went to Washington in 1806 to complete an unexpired term in the U.S. Senate. In 1807, he was re-elected to the Kentucky legislature and became its speaker of the house. Re-elected in 1809, he was again sent to take an unexpired U.S. Senate term in 1810. Returning to Kentucky, he won election to the U.S. House of Representatives, which elected him as its speaker in 1811. As Speaker of the House, Henry Clay was a prominent War Hawk, pushing for expansion and war with Britain. He also served as a peace commissioner in Ghent in the negotiations ending the War of 1812. Clay’s efforts to forge the Missouri Compromise (1820) were the first of several such ventures dealing with expansion and the spread of slavery. Clay was himself a slave owner, but he favored the emancipation of slaves and their resettlement in Africa. The Election of 1824 was decided in the House of Representatives. John Quincy Adams won the presidency and selected Henry Clay as his secretary of state — a move that encouraged critics to claim a "Corrupt Bargain." Clay gained widespread support in his home state and throughout the West for advocacy of the American System. In 1831, Henry Clay returned to the Senate and emerged as the leader of the National Republican party, which later became the Whig Party. He lost a bid for the presidency in 1832, but figured prominently in Jackson's and Biddle's Bank War and the Tariff of 1833. After vetoing the bill to recharter the Second Bank of the United States, Jackson took steps to crush the bank by withdrawing the crucial deposits of federal money. He instructed the Secretary of the Treasury William Duane to do so but Duane would not comply so Jackson replaced him with the more pliant Roger B. Taney. Taney promptly put the federal funds in the Girard Bank of Philadelphia. Henry Clay responded to this by proposing on December 26, 1833, that the Senate censure Jackson for overstepping his authority. On March 28, 1834, the Senate adopted Clay's recommendation by a vote of 26 to 20. Clay’s perhaps most notable achievement came in the Compromise of 1850, in which the “Great Pacificator” or “Great Compromiser” managed temporarily to tame sectional passions. The Whig Party lasted only a short while following Clay’s death, but their ideas, particularly the American System, were taken over by the new Republican Party. Henry Clay did not have much time to live after the Compromise of 1850. He spent the summer of 1851 as his estate Ashland. Although dying of tuberculosis, he returned to Washington and made another appearance in the Senate, but afterwards was confined to his room in the National Hotel, where he died on June 29, 1852.


    An American Family History

    Henrico County was established in 1634 as one Virginia's eight original shires. Its boundaries incorporated an area from which ten Virginia counties were later formed.

    Chesterfield County, Virginia was organized in 1749 when the territory south of the James River was separated from Henrico County.

    Henry Clay was born in 1711 in Cumberland County (was Henrico), Virginia. He was the son of Henry Clay and Mary Mitchell.

    He married Lucy Green about 1735 in Cumberland County, Virginia.

    Henry and Lucy's children probably included:

    Henry Clay (1736, married Rachel Povall),
    Charles Clay (1740, married Phebe Cheatham),
    Samuel Clay ( 1743),
    Thomas Clay (1745, married Susannah Watkins),
    Abijah Clay (1747, maried Sarah Skinner),
    Marston Clay (1749, married Elizabeth Williams),
    Rebecca Clay (1752, married John Marshall),
    John Clay (1754),
    Elijah Clay (1759), and
    Lucy Clay (1756, maried Richard Jones, Jr.).

    When his father died he inherited land.

    I give and bequeath to my son, Henry Clay, the land and plantation he now lives on, and two hundred acres of land at Let alone, in Goochland County, it being the Lower Survey belonging to me at the said Let alone, to him, his heirs and assigns forever.

    Henry died about 1764 in Southam Parish, Cumberland County, Virginia..

    In 1607 the London Company established Virginia as the first permanent New World English colony.

    Halifax County, Virginia was established in May, 1752 from Lunenburg County. The counties of Henry, Patrick and Pittsylvania and part of Franklin were formed out of Halifax.

    from The Clay Family

    Henry Clay, of Southam Parish, Cumberland County, son of Henry and Mary (Mitchell) Clay, of Chesterfield, signed his will March 8, 1764, which was probated October 22, 1764.

    He married, in 1735, Lucy Green, born 1717, daughter of Thomas Green and Elizabeth Marston (born November 25, 1672, died August 11, 1759), daughter of Thomas Marston, Justice of Henrico in 1682, and his wife, Elizabeth Marvell. . .

    Henry Clay mentions as the legatees of his will his wife, Lucy, and their children.
    I. Henry Clay, born, 1736, moved to Kentucky in 1787, died in 1820.
    II. Charles Clay, an early emigrant to Kentucky.
    III. Samuel Clay, member of the North Carolina Legislature, 1789 - 90
    IV. Thomas Clay, of Cumberland County.
    V. Abia Clay, Lieutenant in the Revolutionary Army. (He was called also Obia and Abijah.)
    VI. Marston Clay, married Elizabeth Williams, of Halifax County.
    VII. Rebecca Clay.
    VIII. John Clay, a Captain in the Revolution in 1777.
    IX. Elijah Clay is mentioned in deeds July 13, 1783, and August 2, 1792, when he sells lands in Cumberland County.
    X. Lucy Clay.

    July 28, 1750, Thomas Green, of Amelia, deeds to Henry Clay, of Cumberland, two hundred acres of said Green's Patent of February 10, 1748.

    November 4, 1760, Henry Clay, senior, and Lucy, his wife, deed to Henry Clay, junior (Doctor Henry, of Kentucky), two hundred acres on the north side of the Appomattox, formerly granted "to my father, Henry Clay, deceased, July 9, 1724, whereon my son Henry now lives."

    In deeds of November, 1758, and 1760, Lucy, the wife of Henry Clay, and Martha, the wife of Charles Clay, are identified as the daughters of Elizabeth Green, deceased, whose will was probated January 24, 1760, in Amelia County.


    The Henry Clay

    What once was an historic lodge, hotel, and women&rsquos community center has become a multi-use space servicing the needs of downtown residents, businessmen and women, and tourists.

    Located in the heart of Louisville&rsquos theater district, The Henry Clay is a $20 million mixed-use redevelopment project. The building was built in 1924 as an Elk&rsquos Lodge, and later became the Henry Clay Hotel in 1928 and then the YWCA in 1963. The Wright Taylor building that sits behind The Henry Clay was built in 1928 during the heyday of the Fourth Street commercial boom.

    The Henry Clay is one of the largest historic renovation projects in the country of one of the finest buildings of the neo-classic revival style that grew in popularity during the 1920&rsquos era. This style was used extensively in Louisville from 1910-1930 by the prominent local architecture firm of Joseph and Joseph Architects, which designed the building.

    The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979 because of the significance of its architectural features. The Henry Clay became one of Louisville&rsquos most endangered sites after being abandoned in 1987.

    In 2003, Preservation Kentucky named the old "YWCA" to its Kentucky's Most Endangered list. During the National Trust for Historic Preservation conference, Bill Weyland, with CITY Properties Group, LLC, announced with city officials that he would redevelop the building.

    In 2005, Weyland purchased the property from the City of Louisville. For several years, the City of Louisville had approached many developers with the opportunity to restore the Henry Clay, but deals fell through again and again. The redevelopment of the project was cost prohibitive because of its sensitive historic preservation needs.

    City Properties Group was able to restore the building because of Weyland&rsquos long-term expertise with working with a combination of New Markets and Historic Tax Credits.

    The Henry Clay Today

    Today the Henry Clay is a bustling mixed-use center inhabiting the corner of Third and Chestnut Streets. Its distinctive period décor and ambience gives Louisvillians the opportunity to enjoy pride of place of the theatre district. The Henry Clay offers the largest historic boutique event space in downtown Louisville.

    There are 14 unique event spaces at The Henry Clay available for your unique event. From large ballrooms to intimate settings, The Henry Clay has the space you need to make your special event a success. In-house caterer The Silver Spoon can create any atmosphere and event you desire.

    The Henry Clay has 11 condominiums and 33 loft-style apartments. The unique architectural setting and the downtown location make The Henry Clay a destination of choice for urban living in Louisville.

    The Henry Clay's location in the theatre district in Louisville places it strategically within walking distance to some of downtown's most desirable locations including the 4th Street Live entertainment district, The Palace Theatre, Slugger Field, Waterfront Park, and Louisville's new downtown arena, the KFC Yum! Center. It is also just a short distance to the Louisville Slugger Museum, Churchill Downs, the Louisvlle Science Center, and Glassworks.


    Clay, Henry - History

    Since 2007, the Henry Clay Center has focused on transforming the tone of our country’s national discourse.

    For over 10 years, our mission has focused on civility, discourse, and compromise. Through education and proactive leadership, the Henry Clay Center continues to be a beacon of statesmanship and center of excellence for cooperative national political dialogue.

    Founded in 2007

    The Henry Clay Center was founded as a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization. The mission was dedicated to the education of tomorrow’s leaders in the skills necessary for statesmanship, dialogue, negotiation, and compromise.

    The first annual College Student Congress was held in 2008 and continued until 2012. The organization took time to review and determine its new direction in the role of inspiring current and future leaders in the world of statesmanship.

    The High School Congress

    In 2014, the Henry Clay Center turned its attention to the high school student population. The Center transitioned to developing a new program, inviting younger students to participate in a student congress. This program mirrored much of the College Student Congress’s original design, however, its outreach also assisted high school students in exploring statesmanship as a degree-seeking future. By 2015, the High School Student Congress successfully completed its inaugural year.

    Partnerships and Washington D.C.

    Beginning in 2016, the Henry Clay Center began hosting both the College and High School Student Congresses annually in partnership with the University of Kentucky and Transylvania University. Partnering with both local universities greatly expanded the organization’s ability to recruit and inspire future leaders across the nation. Continuing its popular expansion in 2017, the Center introduced an additional program in Washington, D.C. in conjunction with the College Student Congress. Upon completion of this program, students working towards a career in statesmanship were provided life-changing internships and real-world experience within the American political culture. The Congresses saw a significant rise in participation and support across all 50 states.

    Our Alumni and Future Envisioning

    Today, alumni of the Henry Clay Center now number over 700 and serve in a variety of professions, including as elected state and local officials, staffers in the US. House and Senate, and corporate and legal professionals in the private sector. Many students are nominated and apply for this prestigious opportunity across the country. And while 2020 has been a challenge due to the inability to meet in-person with large groups, the Henry Clay Center continues to grow, thrive, and work together towards its mission and vision. The board members and leadership are excited for 2021 and the organization’s direction moving towards a brighter, more inspired future.


    Clay, Henry - History

    1. Henry Clay was “The Great Compromiser.” As a statesman for the Union, his skills of negotiation and compromise proved invaluable in helping to hold the country together for the first half of the 19th century. His compromises quelled regionalism and balanced states rights and national interests. As a result, the Civil War was averted until it could not be avoided and the nation could survive it.

    2. Henry Clay actively encouraged United States participation in the War of 1812. However, he later served as a member of the treaty delegation that negotiated the Treaty of Ghent, playing an important role in helping to end the war and protect American interests. As a result, the United States emerged as a nation of importance and influence in the world.

    3. Henry Clay changed the role of Speaker of the House and made it the powerful position it is today. Henry Clay held that office longer than anyone in the history of the House of Representatives other than Sam Rayburn.

    4. Henry Clay’s support of the emerging South American republics played a significant role in helping a number of them survive the process of becoming independent nations. He became as popular a figure in parts of South America as Simon Bolivar.

    5. Henry Clay argued many times before the U.S. Supreme Court. In so doing, he introduced the concept of the Amicus Brief to Supreme Court jurisprudence. Henry Clay’s cases continue to be cited on a regular basis today. On a visit to Ashland in 1996, Sandra Day O’Connor noted two cases which had been cited 28 times since her joining the bench in 1981. O’Connor also noted one of the cases had been cited 86 times overall.

    6. As an attorney, Henry Clay was one of the most successful of his era. He won far more cases than he lost, becoming prominent enough to represent the likes of Aaron Burr and Cassius Clay.

    7. As a farmer, Henry Clay became one of the most respected breeders and scientific farmers in the country. He introduced Hereford Cattle to the United States and became one of the most successful providers of mules to the South.

    8. As a horseman and lover of racing, Henry Clay played a major role in Lexington, Kentucky becoming “The Horse Capital of the World.” His prominence as a political figure combined with his love of attending races, made it socially “in vogue” to attend. His success as a breeder drew the attention and admiration of the best horsemen in the country at that time. The blood of his horses still runs in the best Thoroughbreds today. He owned the first syndicated Thoroughbred stallion in America.

    9. Henry Clay influenced a great many future political leaders with his ideology and style. Abraham Lincoln said of Clay that he was “my beau ideal of a statesman” and adopted much of his political ideology himself.

    10. Henry Clay gave his country nearly half a century of service as a Representative, Senator, and Secretary of State. In so doing, Henry Clay became one of the most important political figures of his era. In fact, Henry Clay continues to be one of the most influential of Americans. In the 1950s, Clay was named by a panel of historians and Senate leaders as one of the five greatest senators of all time.


    Clay, Henry - History

    Henry Clay on Slavery
    Digital History ID 323

    Author: Henry Clay
    Date:1831

    Henry Clay favored colonization as the only workable solution to slavery--a position that would later be embraced by one of Clay's ardent admirers, Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865). In this letter, Clay spells out the kind of cautious antislavery position that Garrison began denouncing in 1831.

    I received your letter of the 6th inst. requesting my opinion on certain questions stated by you in respect to the African portion of our population. I have not time to discuss these at large and must therefore confine myself to a brief reply, upon the condition, suggested by yourself that my letter shall not be a subject of publication.

    The question of emancipation, immediate or prospective, as a public measure, appertains, in my opinion, exclusively to the several States, each judging and asking for itself, in which slavery exists. More than thirty years ago I was in favor of the adoption in K[entucky] of a system similar to that which, at the insistence of [Benjamin] Franklin had been previously sanctioned by Penn[sylvani]a. I have never ceased to regret that the decision of this State was adverse to the plan.

    Slavery is undoubtedly a manifest violation of the rights of man. It can only be justified in America, if at all, by necessity. That it entails innumerable mischiefs upon our Country I think is quite clear. It may become dangerous in particular parts of the Union. But the slaves can never, I think, acquire permanent ascendancy in any part.

    Congress has no power, as I think, to establish any system of emancipation, gradual or immediate, in behalf of the present or any future generation. The several states alone, according to our existing institutions, are competent to make provision on that subject, as already intimated.


    The Henry Clay

    What once was an historic lodge, hotel, and women&rsquos community center has become a multi-use space servicing the needs of downtown residents, businessmen and women, and tourists.

    Located in the heart of Louisville&rsquos theater district, The Henry Clay is a $20 million mixed-use redevelopment project. The building was built in 1924 as an Elk&rsquos Lodge, and later became the Henry Clay Hotel in 1928 and then the YWCA in 1963. The Wright Taylor building that sits behind The Henry Clay was built in 1928 during the heyday of the Fourth Street commercial boom.

    The Henry Clay is one of the largest historic renovation projects in the country of one of the finest buildings of the neo-classic revival style that grew in popularity during the 1920&rsquos era. This style was used extensively in Louisville from 1910-1930 by the prominent local architecture firm of Joseph and Joseph Architects, which designed the building.

    The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979 because of the significance of its architectural features. The Henry Clay became one of Louisville&rsquos most endangered sites after being abandoned in 1987.

    In 2003, Preservation Kentucky named the old "YWCA" to its Kentucky's Most Endangered list. During the National Trust for Historic Preservation conference, Bill Weyland, with CITY Properties Group, LLC, announced with city officials that he would redevelop the building.

    In 2005, Weyland purchased the property from the City of Louisville. For several years, the City of Louisville had approached many developers with the opportunity to restore the Henry Clay, but deals fell through again and again. The redevelopment of the project was cost prohibitive because of its sensitive historic preservation needs.

    City Properties Group was able to restore the building because of Weyland&rsquos long-term expertise with working with a combination of New Markets and Historic Tax Credits.

    The Henry Clay Today

    Today the Henry Clay is a bustling mixed-use center inhabiting the corner of Third and Chestnut Streets. Its distinctive period décor and ambience gives Louisvillians the opportunity to enjoy pride of place of the theatre district. The Henry Clay offers the largest historic boutique event space in downtown Louisville.

    There are 14 unique event spaces at The Henry Clay available for your unique event. From large ballrooms to intimate settings, The Henry Clay has the space you need to make your special event a success. In-house caterer The Silver Spoon can create any atmosphere and event you desire.

    The Henry Clay has 11 condominiums and 33 loft-style apartments. The unique architectural setting and the downtown location make The Henry Clay a destination of choice for urban living in Louisville.

    The Henry Clay's location in the theatre district in Louisville places it strategically within walking distance to some of downtown's most desirable locations including the 4th Street Live entertainment district, The Palace Theatre, Slugger Field, Waterfront Park, and Louisville's new downtown arena, the KFC Yum! Center. It is also just a short distance to the Louisville Slugger Museum, Churchill Downs, the Louisvlle Science Center, and Glassworks.


    Watch the video: Η Μεγαλη Μονομαχια 1967 (November 2021).