Information

Edouard Daladier


Edouard Daladier was born in Carpentras, France, on 18th June, 1884. Daladier studied at Lyons under Edouard Herriot and as a member of the Radical Party, he was elected as mayor of Carpentras in 1911.

In 1911 Daladier entered the Chamber of Deputies. Nicknamed the "Bull of Vaucluse", he eventually replaced Herriot as leader of the party. In June, 1924, Daladier was appointed as minister of the colonies. Over the next nine years he held several posts including minister of war.

Daladier became prime minister in January, 1933, but his government only survived for seven months. A second government, in 1934, only lasted for a few weeks.

Concerned by the emergence of Adolf Hitler in Nazi Germany, a group of left-wing politicians, led by Leon Blum, Maurice Thorez, Edouard Herriot, Daniel Mayer formed the Popular Front in 1934. Parties involved in the agreement included the Communist Party, the Socialist Party and Daladier's Radical Party.

The parties involved in the Popular Front did well in the 1936 parliamentary elections and won a total of 376 seats. Leon Blum, leader of the Socialist Party, now become prime minister of France and Daladier became Minister of War.

Once in power the Popular Front government introduced the 40 hour week and other social reforms. It also nationalized the Bank of France and the armaments industry.

At the beginning of the Spanish Civil War Daladier supported Blum's attempt to provide military aid to the Popular Front government in Spain. However, after coming under pressure from Stanley Baldwin and Anthony Eden in Britain, and more right-wing members of the government, he changed his mind and began advocating a policy of neutrality.

In April, 1938, Daladier once again became prime minister. He was a supporter of appeasement and on 29th September, 1938, he joined with Adolf Hitler, Neville Chamberlain and Benito Mussolini in signing the Munich Agreement which transferred to Germany the Sudetenland, a fortified frontier region that contained a large German-speaking population.

When Eduard Benes, Czechoslovakia's head of state, who had not been invited to Munich, protested at this decision, Daladier and Neville Chamberlain told him that their countries would be unwilling to go to war over the issue of the Sudetenland.

In March 1940 Paul Reynaud became France's new prime minister. Daladier was appointed war minister in Reynaud's government. When the German Army invaded France in May 1940, Daladier escaped to Morocco. Henri-Philippe Petain ordered his arrest and he was tried in February, 1942, with Leon Blum and Paul Reynaud for betraying his country. He was then handed over to the Germans who held him prisoner until 1945.

After the war Daladier was elected to the Chamber of Deputies in 1946. A strong opponent of Charles De Gaulle, Daladier retired from politics in 1958. Edouard Daladier died in Paris on 10th October, 1970.

At last, at one in the morning, the document is completed. Everybody is satisfied, even the French - even the Czechs, according to what Daladier tells me.

Ribbentrop has handed me a project for a tripartite alliance between Italy, Germany, and Japan. He says it is the "biggest thing in the world". He always exaggerates, Ribbentrop.


DALADIER, ÉDOUARD (1884–1970)

É douard Daladier, having given up all political activity in the last decade of his life, was already mostly forgotten when he died at the age of eighty-six, though he had been one of the prominent figures in French politics during the 1930s and, except for the period from July 1926 to March 1930, had served in the government continuously from 1925 to 1940. The son of a baker from Carpentras in the south of France, he was intellectually very gifted, placing first in the history agrégation, the French teaching certification examination, of 1909. But he devoted very little time to teaching. In 1911, at the age of twenty-seven, he was elected mayor of his native town of Carpentras. He served in World War I, achieving the rank of infantry lieutenant, and received the Croix de Guerre with four citations for bravery. The war marked him profoundly. After it ended, he devoted himself entirely to politics. A member of the Radical Party, he was elected deputy of the Vaucluse region in 1919 and continuously reelected until 1940. He very quickly stood out from the mass of deputies. After the victory of the Cartel des Gauches (Left-wing cartel) in 1924, Premier Édouard Herriot, also a professor (of literature)—Daladier had been his student in Lyon—appointed him minister for the colonies. Although these two men were both part of the Left and members of the Radical Party, their political views were quite different. Herriot was a moderate radical and Daladier more of a leftist. He was closely allied with the socialists, though he never believed in socialism.

Daladier played his major political role during the 1930s, concerning himself with three major issues: the incapacity of certain institutions to prevent permanent governmental instability the economic and social troubles related to the world crisis and the increasing external threats occasioned by the Nazis' rise to power in Germany. The France of Édouard Daladier's time was in crisis. As premier in 1934, he had to face the growing lawlessness of the far-right leagues. On 6 February, he was forced to resign. This only convinced him that in order to face the danger, the Radical Party over which he had presided had to strengthen its ties with other leftist forces. Despite Herriot's great reluctance, Daladier became an active supporter of the Popular Front, standing with the socialists and the communists. After the electoral victory of the Front, he was appointed vice president in Léon Blum's government, formed in June 1936.

Nevertheless, Daladier progressively distanced himself from the Popular Front—a growing number of radicals were disconcerted by its revolutionary aspects. Moreover, he had been interested in military issues for a long time and served as minister of war, and then of national defense, almost continuously from 1933 to 1940. He was aware of the contradiction between social measures such as reducing the workweek to forty hours and the large industrial effort necessary to rebuild the army, which had been more or less abandoned since World War I.

When he once again became premier in 1938, he severed his ties with the Popular Front and, with Paul Reynaud, his minister of finance, set about "putting France back to work." He set in motion a huge rearmament effort but was nevertheless still unable to provide the army with competent leaders. Still traumatized by the memories of the enormous number of casualties at the beginning of the war in 1914, he leaned toward a policy of defense.

Reluctantly, and with few illusions about its success, Daladier signed the Munich agreement with Adolf Hitler in September 1938 because he could not count on the support of the United Kingdom and because France was not ready for war. In November, he thwarted a general strike called to protest the government's intentions to modify existing social laws. He was enjoying great popularity when, in March 1939, Germany annexed what was left of Czechoslovakia. Daladier was determined to stand his ground. When Germany attacked Poland on 1 September 1939, France and the United Kingdom responded by declaring war. After a few days of hesitation, the French Communist Party officially came out in support of the German-Soviet pact signed that August and requested negotiations with Germany. Daladier dissolved the party and emerged as the leader of the powerful anticommunist wave that hit France at the time.

On the military level, however, the Allies chose a strategy of defense, as they were convinced that over time they would achieve considerable material superiority. This was the "phony war," which ended with the German offensive of May 1940. Daladier, accused of not waging war energetically enough, had been replaced in March by Paul Reynaud. After the 1940 defeat, Daladier would have liked to continue the fight from abroad, but a majority of deputies handed power over to Marshal Philippe Pétain, who signed the Armistice in June. Daladier was arrested under orders of the Occupation government in Vichy and was among those who stood accused at the Riom trials of being responsible for the war. But the trials were soon suspended under German pressure after a vigorous defense was mounted, especially of Daladier. He was handed over to the Germans and remained in detention until the end of the war.

Despite the violent allegations against him by the then very powerful Communist Party, which never forgave him for his attitude toward them in 1939, Daladier returned to France and to his old post of deputy for Vaucluse in June 1946. The Radical Party, however, was only a shadow of its former self, and it fused into a coalition of left-wing parties, the Rassemblement des Gauches Républicaines, an alliance of circumstance with little power. And while Herriot managed to become president of the National Assembly, Daladier never again played an important role. He made his presence felt with his opposition to the European Defense Community (EDC), paradoxically holding the same views as the communists. He was mayor of Avignon from 1953 to 1958 but, like many others, was swept out of office that year by the Gaullist wave and lost his seat as deputy. He never again sought to reclaim it.

Daladier was nicknamed the "Bull of the Vaucluse," but his determined attitude hid the fact that he was never able to be the man of action that everyone expected.


Édouard Daladier

French politician (Carpentras, Vaucluse, 1884-Paris, 1970).This professor of geography and history of modest origin assumed a militant republican attitude under the impact of the Dreyfus case, which led him to join the Radical Socialist Party.In their lists, he was elected deputy, representing Vaucluse between 1919 and 1940.After the victory of the left-wing coalition in 1924, he became part of the government chaired by his teacher Herriot.

During the following years he assumed the presidency of the Council of Ministers on two occasions (1933 and 1934) but he stood out above all as Minister of War (1932-1934 and 1936-1940), a position that made him the main rector of national defense policy against the expansionism of Nazi Germany and, therefore, partially responsible for the French military incapacity in the face of the German invasion of 1940.He was one of the architects of the Popular Front that prevailed in the 1936 elections, rallying the French left to stop the fascist threat and he succeeded Léon Blum as Prime Minister in the crucial period 1938-1940.

As representative of France at the Munich Conference (1938), he allowed himself to be carried away by the policy of "appeasement" of British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain and acceded to Hitler's claims on Czechoslovakia.Aware of the mistake made, he did not repeat it when Hitler invaded Poland: like England, France declared war on Germany, thus initiating World War II (1939-1945).Daladier's government fell a few months later, in March 1940.

After the invasion of France by the Nazis (June 1940), Daladier was detained by the collaborationist Vichy authorities and tried as responsible for the French military defeat he defended himself so vigorously that the trial had to be suspended (1942).Later he was deported to Germany (1943-1945).


Edouard Daladier - History

PARIS, Oct. 11--Edouard Daladier, one of the most prominent leaders of the prewar Third Republic, died here yesterday, an almost forgotten man. He was 86 years old.

As Premier, Minister of Defense and Foreign Minister in the nineteen-thirties, Mr. Daladier led his country into a war that brought it one of the most crushing defeats of its history and ended the Third Republic.

In the Fourth Republic, formed in 1946, he won a bitterly contested comeback, and until 1958 was regularly elected deputy from the Vaucluse Department, where he retained his popularity. Defeated in 1958, he lived in quiet obscurity in an apartment in western Paris.

He leaves his second wife, the former Jeanne Boucoiran, whom he married in 1951, and two sons, Jean and Pierre, by his first wife, the former Madeline Laffort, who died in 1932.

In the inglorious fall of France, a process that went on for at least a decade and culminated in her crushing defeat by Germany in the spring of 1940, Edouard Daladier played a conspicuous part. Perennially Minister of War and thrice Premier (he was in office when World War II began in September, 1939), he was one of those political leaders who failed, until it was far too late, to perceive the menace of Hitlerism to France, to Europe and to the world.

Irresolute, weak, intellectually unalert, Mr. Daladier pushed France a giant step along the road to her doom by joining in the Munich Pact of September, 1938, whereby his country&aposs ally, Czechoslovakia, was virtually dismembered and Adolf Hitler&aposs appetite for a war of genocidal conquest was sharpened.

Mr. Daladier was not the architect of the pact (British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain was that) so much as an accomplice in it. He was not initially eager to abandon Czechoslovakia and France&aposs traditional balance-of-power policy. Indeed, he talked to Chamberlain once about attacking Germany but he permitted himself to be dissuaded on the ground that such a step would surely result in a general war and ultimately he signed the pact along with Chamberlain, Hitler and Benito Mussolini, Italy&aposs Fascist dictator.

Justifying his action, Mr. Daladier said at Munich:

"I believe we have done the reasonable thing. Should 15 million Europeans have been killed in order to oblige three million Sudeteners, who wished to be German, to remain in Czechoslovakia?"

Yet Mr. Daladier was shrewd enough to realize that yielding to Hitler&aposs demands for German occupation of the Sudetenland was a grave diplomatic and military setback for France. Flying back to Paris, he voiced somber thoughts for France&aposs future, and feared that he would meet a hostile reception from a public apprehensive over this latest triumph of German bellicosity.

To his astonishment, he was wildly cheered. "I return," he told the airport crowd, "with the profound conviction that this accord is indispensable to the peace of Europe."

However, according to William L. Shirer&aposs "The Collapse of the Third Republic," this episode also occurred:

"To Gen. [Maurice] Gamelin, waiting among the crowd of notables at the airport, he whispered: &aposIt wasn&apost brilliant, but I did everything I could.&apos Gamelin was thinking of the 35 Czech divisions lost, and [Paul] Reynaud needled him by asking: &aposWhere are you going to find 35 new divisions now?&apos Daladier, who was Minister of Defense as well as Premier, could not fail to think of them too. Still surprised at the tumultuous welcome along his route back to the capital, he is reported to have turned to an aide and said: "The imbeciles--if they only knew what they were acclaiming!"

Political Success Story

Mr. Daladier, in truth, was not a great leader but an agile politician, most of whose adult life up to 1940 had been passed in climbing the slippery pole of public advancement. Born June 18, 1884, in Carpentras, a village near Avignon in southern France, Edouard Daladier was the son of a baker. Bright in school, the young man was sent to the Lycee Duparc in Lyons, where he met Edouard Herriot, then a teacher and later a leader of the Radical Socialist party, who was to introduce his protege to politics.

Won Mayoralty in 1912

On graduation, he taught history, first, at the University of Nimes, then at Grenoble, Marseilles and in 1919 at the Lycee Condorcet in Paris. Meantime, in 1912, he entered politics by winning the mayoralty of his home town and two years later he stood for the Chamber of Deputies and was beaten by the Radical Socialist candidate. Invoking an ancient political rubric, he joined the Radical Socialists.

In World War I Mr. Daladier went into the army as a sergeant and was demobilized as a captain with a Croix de Guerre and the Legion of Honor won in action.

A war hero, Mr. Daladier had no trouble being elected to the Chamber of Deputies as a Radical Socialist from the town of Orange in the Department of Vaucluse. He was re- elected consistently for the next 20 years.

With the help of Mr. Herriot, the leader of the Radical Socialists, Mr. Daladier found a place in the Cabinet in 1924. He was represented in every subsequent Cabinet in which his party participated, either as Minister of War, Colonies, Education, Public Works or National Defense, or as Vice Premier or Minister of Foreign Affairs.

At last, in 1933, Mr. Daladier became Premier, forming a Cabinet that lasted nine months. In this period, he and his Foreign Minister, Joseph Paul-Boncour, attempted to establish a four-power directorate for Europe consisting of Britain, France, Germany and Italy. The pact was shattered by Germany&aposs defiant exit from the League of Nations, the beginning of a series of events that led to Munich and World War II.

Mr. Daladier&aposs second Premiership was in early 1934, and lasted only 11 days. He was obliged to resign after his vigorous efforts to quell Paris demonstrations on Feb. 6 over a financial scandal resulted in some 20 deaths.

Ironically, he had been appointed Premier because of public confidence in his personal probity, a confidence that was justified by Mr. Daladier&aposs atypical disinterest in graft. Then and later he lived quite simply, content with an unpretentious apartment heavy with books.

Not notably social, he preferred small gatherings, such as the salon maintained in the late thirties by his mistress, the Marquise de Crussol, the handsome daughter of a wealthy sardine packer. It was at the Marquise&aposs salon that he accommodated himself to French business and industrial interests after he dropped out of the leftist Popular Front of 1935- 38.

In that period Mr. Daladier not only served as Minister of War, but he also made a number of platform appearances with Leon Blum, the Socialist leader, and Maurice Thorez, the Communist chieftain. In these speeches he declared his enmity to "a financial oligarchy from whom power must be wrested and given back to the people."

However, when he became Premier for the third (and final) time in April, 1938, his Government moved perceptibly to the right. He moved to abolish the 40-hour factory week, broke strikes by force and sealed the Spanish border, thus effectively helping Francisco Franco to crush the Republican Government of Spain.

In the year between Munich and the start of World War II, Mr. Daladier was publicly optimistic about the chances of peace while building up, as best he could, his country&aposs armaments. When Germany opened the war with an attack on Poland, France could no longer ignore her treaty obligations to an ally, and entered the conflict.

However, instead of attacking Germany from the west, France kept her soldiers in the Maginot forts, and what came to be known as "the phony war" developed on the Franco- German front as neither side moved against the other. Mr. Daladier, meanwhile, helped to create a super-Maginot myth by declaring on every occasion that "formidable" fortifications had been constructed on the Belgian frontier, with an implication that a German invasion was unlikely.

Thus, when Hitler struck west in the spring of 1940, the French public was ill-prepared for the swiftness of the German advance, the dispatch with which the Maginot Line crumpled and the thrust across the Belgian border, where the defenses proved virtually nonexistent.

But by the time the German blitzkrieg opened, Mr. Daladier had resigned as Premier (he stepped down March 20 after losing a vote of confidence) although he remained in the Cabinet of Paul Reynaud, his successor, until June 2. Neither in France&aposs defeat, which occurred in the middle of June, nor later, was it suggested that Mr. Daladier was lacking in patriotism: His judgment was questioned but not his commitment to France.

Denounced Petain Regime

Indeed, under the pro-German Vichy regime of Marshal Henri-Philippe Petain, Mr. Daladier was arrested and tried for war guilt at Riom in 1942. He was accused of declaring war against Germany without Parliament&aposs concurrence and with having failed to equip the army properly.

At his trial he courageously denounced the Vichy regime, and was imprisoned first in France and then in Germany. He was liberated by American troops in 1945.

After the war he was elected to the Constituent Assembly, in 1946, and seated by a vote of 311 to 132 in a challenge to his war record.


Chamberlain Declares “Peace for Our Time”

For days, dread had blanketed London like a fog. Only a generation removed from the horrors of World War I, which had claimed nearly one million of its people, Britain was once again on the brink of armed conflict with Germany. Hitler, who had annexed Austria earlier in the year, had vowed to invade Czechoslovakia on October 1, 1938, to occupy the German-speaking Sudetenland region, a move toward the creation of a “greater Germany” that could potentially ignite another conflagration among the great European powers.

The clouds of war billowed in the British capital as the hours to the deadline dwindled. As Chamberlain mobilized the Royal Navy, Londoners, including the prime minister’s wife, prayed on bended knees inside Westminster Abbey. Workers covered the windows of government offices with sandbags and installed sirens in police stations to warn of approaching enemy bombers. By torchlight, they scarred the city’s pristine parks by digging miles of trenches to be used as air-raid shelters. A knot of traffic snarled the city as Londoners began an exodus. Hundreds of thousands who planned to stay in the city stood patiently in line for government-issued gas masks and air-raid handbooks. London Zoo officials even developed plans to station gun-toting men in front of cages to shoot the wild animals in case bombs broke open their cages and freed them.

Just two days before the deadline, Hitler agreed to meet in Munich with Chamberlain, Italian leader Benito Mussolini and French premier Edouard Daladier to discuss a diplomatic resolution to the crisis. The four leaders, without any input from Czechoslovakia in the negotiation, agreed to cede the Sudetenland to Hitler. Chamberlain also separately drafted a non-aggression pact between Britain and Germany that Hitler signed.

When news of the diplomatic breakthrough reached the British capital, normally staid London responded like a death-row prisoner granted a last-minute reprieve. Jubilation and waves of relief washed over London in a celebration that had not been seen since the armistice that silenced the guns of World War I.

On a rainy autumn evening, thousands awaited the prime minister’s return at London’s Heston Aerodrome, and the thankful crowd cheered wildly as the door to his British Airways airplane opened. As raindrops fell on Chamberlain’s silver hair, he stepped onto the airport tarmac. He held aloft the nonaggression pact that had been inked by him and Hitler only hours before, and the flimsy piece of paper flapped in the breeze. The prime minister read to the nation the brief agreement that reaffirmed “the desire of our two peoples never to go to war with one another again.”

Summoned to Buckingham Palace to give a first-hand report to King George VI, Chamberlain was cheered on by thousands who lined the five-mile route from the airport. As the rain poured, thousands flooded the plaza in front of the royal residence. As if it were a coronation or a royal wedding, the frenzied cheers brought forth the king and queen along with Chamberlain and his wife onto the palace balcony. In an unprecedented move, the smiling king motioned the prime minister to step forward and receive the crowd’s adulation as he receded into the background to leave the stage solely to a commoner.

After his royal audience, Chamberlain returned to his official residence at No. 10 Downing Street. There a jubilant crowd shouted “Good old Neville!” and sang 𠇏or He’s a Jolly Good Fellow.” From a second-floor window, Chamberlain addressed the crowd and invoked Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli’s famous statement upon returning home from the Berlin Congress of 1878, “My good friends, this is the second time in our history that there has come back from Germany to Downing Street peace with honor. I believe it is peace for our time.”


Édouard Daladier

Édouard Daladier was a French "radical" (i.e. centrist) politician and the Prime Minister of France at the start of the Second World War.

Daladier was born in Carpentras, Vaucluse. Later, he would become known to many as "the bull of Vaucluse" because of his thick neck and large shoulders and determined look, although cynics also quipped that his horns were like those of a snail. During World War I, he rose from private to captain and company commander.

A government minister in various posts during the coalition governments between 1924 and 1928, he was instrumental in the Radical Party's break with the socialist SFIO in 1926, the first Cartel des gauches &ndash "Left-wing Coalition"), and with the conservative Raymond Poincaré in November 1928.

Daladier became a leading member of the Radicals. In 1932 he knew from German rivals to Hitler that Krupps was manufacturing heavy artillery and the Deuxieme Bureau had a grasp of the scale of German military preparations, but lacked hard intelligence of their hostile intentions. He first became Prime Minister in 1933, and then again in 1934 for a few days when the Stavisky Affair led to the riots of February 1934 instigated by the far right and the fall of the second Cartel des gauches.

Daladier became Minister of War for the Popular Front coalition in 1936 after the fall of the Popular Front, he became Prime Minister again on April 10, 1938.

While the forty-hour working week was abolished under Daladier's government, a more generous system of family allowances was established, set as a percentage of wages: for the first child, 5% for the second, 10% and for each additional child, 15%. Also created was a home-mother allowance, which had been advocated by pronatalist and Catholic women&rsquos groups since 1929. All mothers who were not professionally employed and whose husbands collected family allowances were eligible for this new benefit. In March 1939, the government added 10% for workers whose wives stayed home to take care of the children. Family allowances were enshrined in the Family Code of July 1939 and, with the exception of the stay-at-home allowance, have remained in force to this day. In addition, a decree of was issued in May 1938 which authorized the establishment of vocational guidance centers. In July 1937, a law was passed (which was followed by a similar law in May 1946) that empowered the Department of Workplace Inspection to order temporary medical interventions.

Munich

Daladier's last government was in power at the time of the negotiations preceding the Munich Agreement, when France backed out of its obligations to defend Czechoslovakia against Nazi Germany. He was pushed into negotiating by Britain's Neville Chamberlain. Unlike Chamberlain, Daladier had no illusions about Hitler's ultimate goals. In fact, he told the British in a late April 1938 meeting that Hitler's real aim was to eventually secure "a domination of the Continent in comparison with which the ambitions of Napoleon were feeble." He went on to say "Today, it is the turn of Czechoslovakia. Tomorrow, it will be the turn of Poland and Romania. When Germany has obtained the oil and wheat it needs, she will turn on the West. Certainly we must multiply our efforts to avoid war. But that will not be obtained unless Great Britain and France stick together, intervening in Prague for new concessions but declaring at the same time that they will safeguard the independence of Czechoslovakia. If, on the contrary, the Western Powers capitulate again, they will only precipitate the war they wish to avoid."

Nevertheless, perhaps discouraged by the pessimistic and defeatist attitudes of both military and civilian members of the French government, as well as traumatized by France's blood-bath in World War I that he personally witnessed, Daladier ultimately let Chamberlain have his way. On his return to Paris, Daladier, who was expecting a hostile crowd, was acclaimed. He then commented to his aide, Alexis Léger: "Ah, les cons (morons)!".

World War II

In October 1938, Daladier opened secret talks with the Americans on how to bypass American neutrality laws and allow the French to buy American aircraft to make up for productivity deficiencies in the French aircraft industry. Daladier commented in October 1938, "If I had three or four thousand aircraft, Munich would never have happened," and he was most anxious to buy American war planes as the only way to strengthen the French Air Force. A major problem in the Franco-American talks was how the French were to pay for the American planes, as well as how to bypass the American neutrality acts In addition, France had defaulted on its World War I debts in 1932 and hence fell foul of the American Johnson Act of 1934, which forbade loans to nations that had defaulted on their World War I debts. In February 1939, the French offered to cede their possessions in the Caribbean and the Pacific together with a lump sum payment of 10 billion francs, in exchange for the unlimited right to buy, on credit, American aircraft. After tortuous negotiations, an arrangement was worked out in the spring of 1939 to allow the French to place huge orders with the American aircraft industry though, as most of the aircraft ordered had not arrived in France by 1940, the Americans arranged for French orders to be diverted to the British.

When the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact was signed, Daladier responded to the public outcry by outlawing the French Communist Party on the basis that it had refused to condemn Joseph Stalin's actions. In 1939, after the German invasion of Poland, he was reluctant to go to war, but he did so on September 3, 1939, inaugurating the Phoney War. On October 6 of that year, Hitler offered France and Great Britain a peace proposal. There were more than a few in the French government prepared to take Hitler up on his offer but, in a nationwide broadcast the next day, Daladier declared, "We took up arms against aggression. We shall not put them down until we have guarantees for a real peace and security, a security which is not threatened every six months." On 29 January 1940, in a radio address delivered to the people of France entitled The Nazi's Aim is Slavery, Daladier left little doubt about his opinion of the Germans. In his radio address, he said: "For us, there is more to do than merely win the war. We shall win it, but we must also win a victory far greater than that of arms. In this world of masters and slaves, which those madmen who rule at Berlin are seeking to forge, we must also save liberty and human dignity."

In March 1940, Daladier resigned as Prime Minister in France because of his failure to aid Finland's defence during the Winter War, and he was replaced by Paul Reynaud. Daladier remained Minister of Defence, however, and his antipathy to Paul Reynaud prevented Reynaud from dismissing Maurice Gamelin as Supreme Commander of all French armed forces. As a result of the massive German breakthrough at Sedan, Daladier swapped ministerial offices with Reynaud, taking over the Foreign Ministry while Reynaud took over Defence. Gamelin was finally replaced by Maxime Weygand in May 1940, nine days after the Germans began their invasion campaign. Under the impression the government would continue in North Africa, Daladier fled with other members of the government to Morocco but he was arrested and tried for treason by the Vichy government during the "Riom Trial". Daladier was interned in Fort du Portalet in the Pyrenees. He was kept in prison from 1940 to April 1943, when he was handed over to the Germans and deported to Buchenwald concentration camp in Germany. In May 1943, he was transported to the Itter Castle in North Tyrol with other French dignitaries, where he remained until the end of the war. He was freed after the Battle for Castle Itter.

After the War ended, Daladier was a member of the Chamber of Deputies, where he was an opponent of Charles de Gaulle. He was also mayor of Avignon from 1953 until 1958. He died in Paris in 1970 and is buried in the famous cemetery of Père-Lachaise.


World War II Database


ww2dbase Édouard Daladier was born in Carpentras, Vaucluse, France. He entered WW1 as an army private, and by the time the conflict ended he had been promoted to the rank of captain and commanded a company. Between 1924 and 1928, he served in various governmental posts and was instrumental in the growth of the Radical Party. By the late 1920s, he had been an influential leader of the Radical Party. He became the French Prime Minister between 31 Jan and 26 Oct 1933, and then again, briefly, between 30 Jan and 9 Feb 1934. In 1936, he served as the Minister of War for the Popular Front coalition. On 10 Apr 1938, he became the Prime Minister of France for the third time. Daladier believed that Adolf Hitler's had ambitions to dominate, by force if necessary, all of Europe, but at the Munich Conference of Sep 1938, Daladier gave in to Hitler's pressure and agreed to cede Sudetenland from Czechoslovakia to Germany he was persuaded by either Prime Minister of the United Kingdom Neville Chamberlain or the French unwillingness to enter any form of war with another European power, or perhaps both. He was welcomed back into France by a cheering crowd upon his return from Munich, Germany Daladier reportedly said to his aid "[a]h, les cons!" ("ah, the fools!"). When the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact was signed in Aug 1939, he outlawed the French Communist Party. When Germany invaded Poland on 1 Sep 1939, Daladier was initially reluctant to go into war, despite the terms of the Franco-Polish alliance, and delayed the declaration until 4 Sep. On 6 Oct, Hitler offered France and the United Kingdom a peace proposal, but Daladier rejected, saying that "[w]e took up arms against aggression. We shall not put them down until we have guarantees for a real peace and security, a security which is not threatened every six months." In Mar 1940, he resigned as Prime Minister and remained in the government as the Minister of Defense. When Germany invaded France in May 1940, upon the collapse of French defenses, he fled with other members of government to Morocco in North Africa, but was arrested by the puppet Vichy government for treason. He was imprisoned until 1943, after which he was handed over to the Germans and spent the remainder of the war in the Buchenwald concentration camp. After WW2, he returned to politics as a member of the Chamber of Deputies. Between 1953 and 1958, he was the mayor of Avignon. He passed away in Paris, France in 1970 and now rests in the Père-Lachaise cemetery in Paris.

ww2dbase Source: Wikipedia.

Last Major Revision: Sep 2009

Édouard Daladier Interactive Map

Édouard Daladier Timeline

18 Jun 1884 Édouard Daladier was born in Carpentras, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France.
21 Mar 1939 Édouard Daladier resigned as the French Prime Minister.
7 Oct 1939 French Prime Minister Édouard Daladier rejected Adolf Hitler's proposal for a multi-power conference for peace on the previous day.
19 Mar 1940 The French Parliament criticized Prime Minister Daladier for the French inaction during the Winter War. Daladier resigned after a vote of no confidence.
22 Mar 1940 French Prime Minister Paul Reynaud named his predecessor Édouard Daladier as Minister of War despite their opposite political views.
30 Mar 1940 French Minister of Defense Daladier persuaded the French War Committee not to ratify British proposal to mine the Rhine River. British responded by threatening to abandon the plan to mine Norwegian waters.
10 Oct 1970 Édouard Daladier passed away.

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World War II Database


ww2dbase Édouard Daladier was born in Carpentras, Vaucluse, France. He entered WW1 as an army private, and by the time the conflict ended he had been promoted to the rank of captain and commanded a company. Between 1924 and 1928, he served in various governmental posts and was instrumental in the growth of the Radical Party. By the late 1920s, he had been an influential leader of the Radical Party. He became the French Prime Minister between 31 Jan and 26 Oct 1933, and then again, briefly, between 30 Jan and 9 Feb 1934. In 1936, he served as the Minister of War for the Popular Front coalition. On 10 Apr 1938, he became the Prime Minister of France for the third time. Daladier believed that Adolf Hitler's had ambitions to dominate, by force if necessary, all of Europe, but at the Munich Conference of Sep 1938, Daladier gave in to Hitler's pressure and agreed to cede Sudetenland from Czechoslovakia to Germany he was persuaded by either Prime Minister of the United Kingdom Neville Chamberlain or the French unwillingness to enter any form of war with another European power, or perhaps both. He was welcomed back into France by a cheering crowd upon his return from Munich, Germany Daladier reportedly said to his aid "[a]h, les cons!" ("ah, the fools!"). When the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact was signed in Aug 1939, he outlawed the French Communist Party. When Germany invaded Poland on 1 Sep 1939, Daladier was initially reluctant to go into war, despite the terms of the Franco-Polish alliance, and delayed the declaration until 4 Sep. On 6 Oct, Hitler offered France and the United Kingdom a peace proposal, but Daladier rejected, saying that "[w]e took up arms against aggression. We shall not put them down until we have guarantees for a real peace and security, a security which is not threatened every six months." In Mar 1940, he resigned as Prime Minister and remained in the government as the Minister of Defense. When Germany invaded France in May 1940, upon the collapse of French defenses, he fled with other members of government to Morocco in North Africa, but was arrested by the puppet Vichy government for treason. He was imprisoned until 1943, after which he was handed over to the Germans and spent the remainder of the war in the Buchenwald concentration camp. After WW2, he returned to politics as a member of the Chamber of Deputies. Between 1953 and 1958, he was the mayor of Avignon. He passed away in Paris, France in 1970 and now rests in the Père-Lachaise cemetery in Paris.

ww2dbase Source: Wikipedia.

Last Major Revision: Sep 2009

Édouard Daladier Interactive Map

Édouard Daladier Timeline

18 Jun 1884 Édouard Daladier was born in Carpentras, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France.
21 Mar 1939 Édouard Daladier resigned as the French Prime Minister.
7 Oct 1939 French Prime Minister Édouard Daladier rejected Adolf Hitler's proposal for a multi-power conference for peace on the previous day.
19 Mar 1940 The French Parliament criticized Prime Minister Daladier for the French inaction during the Winter War. Daladier resigned after a vote of no confidence.
22 Mar 1940 French Prime Minister Paul Reynaud named his predecessor Édouard Daladier as Minister of War despite their opposite political views.
30 Mar 1940 French Minister of Defense Daladier persuaded the French War Committee not to ratify British proposal to mine the Rhine River. British responded by threatening to abandon the plan to mine Norwegian waters.
10 Oct 1970 Édouard Daladier passed away.

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Edouard Daladier - History

Determine road names and types

Точки

  • 559331170 (содержится в линиях Pont Édouard Daladier ( 779576743 ), Pont Édouard Daladier ( 799117822 ) и Pont Édouard Daladier ( 799117821 ))
  • 1771474778
  • 2806846532
  • 2806846531
  • 559335752
  • 559335750
  • 309826968
  • 657429 (содержится в линиях 43983414 и 43985984)

Версия #6

Точки

  • 559331170 (содержится в линиях Pont Édouard Daladier ( 779576743 ), Pont Édouard Daladier ( 799117822 ) и Pont Édouard Daladier ( 799117821 ))
  • 1771474778
  • 2806846532
  • 2806846531
  • 559335752
  • 559335750
  • 309826968
  • 657429 (содержится в линиях 43983414 и 43985984)

Версия #5

Точки

  • 559331170 (содержится в линиях Pont Édouard Daladier ( 779576743 ), Pont Édouard Daladier ( 799117822 ) и Pont Édouard Daladier ( 799117821 ))
  • 1771474778
  • 2806846532
  • 2806846531
  • 559335752
  • 559335750
  • 309826968
  • 657429 (содержится в линиях 43983414 и 43985984)

Версия #4

FR84, Avignon Ajout de rues, éléments redessinnés

Точки

  • 559331170 (содержится в линиях Pont Édouard Daladier ( 779576743 ), Pont Édouard Daladier ( 799117822 ) и Pont Édouard Daladier ( 799117821 ))
  • 1771474778
  • 2806846532
  • 2806846531
  • 559335752
  • 559335750
  • 309826968
  • 657429 (содержится в линиях 43983414 и 43985984)

Версия #3

FR84,Avignon: qualification highway

Точки

  • 559331170 (содержится в линиях Pont Édouard Daladier ( 779576743 ), Pont Édouard Daladier ( 799117822 ) и Pont Édouard Daladier ( 799117821 ))
  • 1771474778
  • 559335752
  • 559335750
  • 309826968
  • 657429 (содержится в линиях 43983414 и 43985984)

Версия #2

Точки

  • 559331170 (содержится в линиях Pont Édouard Daladier ( 779576743 ), Pont Édouard Daladier ( 799117822 ) и Pont Édouard Daladier ( 799117821 ))
  • 1771474778
  • 559335752
  • 559335750
  • 309826968
  • 657429 (содержится в линиях 43983414 и 43985984)

Версия #1

Améliorations diverses (calage)

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Why was eduard daladier removed?

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ZeDango

Corporal

The focuses "form the popular front" and "revive the national bloc" used to change leaders to leon blum and pierre laval respectively. Now it just starts with laval. Why?

Is this a bug? He was still the president until 1940 (If I remember correctly) IRL.

Handy Mission Icons - Ok_hand meme mod for EU4.
Muse's Map Package - Scavenged resources from other map mods to create a map with contrast and depth for EU4.
Trapy Mikloş Horthy - A HISTORICAL HoI4 portrait mod for the leader of Hungary. It's also fucking dead.

Captain

The focuses "form the popular front" and "revive the national bloc" used to change leaders to leon blum and pierre laval respectively. Now it just starts with laval. Why?

Is this a bug? He was still the president until 1940 (If I remember correctly) IRL.

The reason is that not much effort was put on France (and most effort actually put was misguided).

Historically Blum's government fell apart in 37, from a combination of disagreement on what to do with Spain, failure to solve the economic crisis, and stopped the social reforms without it really making the opposition stop being antisemitic assholes (Blum was Jewish and criticized for that by the usual people). A radical (basically center, in this case center left) became prime minister, failed to do anything, Blum had a short lived attempt in 38 to solve things, but fail to get the support to pass the necessary reforms.

After which the Radicals took control and Daladier became prime minister in April 1938, until his government would fall following the Winter War, replaced by Paul Reynaud in March 1940 (Daladier would stay in the government as Defense minister). As Daladier walked back on some reforms, the Front Populaire broke apart then.

None of this is represented or even hinted in game in anyway except for maybe the "revoke the Matignon agreement" decision. Presumably, there should be event, focus and decisions that would cause the change of governement or let you keep Blum depending on your actions. I dare to say that managing to make the Front Populaire holds would make far better alt-history than "what if Napoleon 6 became Emperor and decided to AVENGE WATERLOO"?

ZeDango

Corporal

The reason is that not much effort was put on France (and most effort actually put was misguided).

Historically Blum's government fell apart in 37, from a combination of disagreement on what to do with Spain, failure to solve the economic crisis, and stopped the social reforms without it really making the opposition stop being antisemitic assholes (Blum was Jewish and criticized for that by the usual people). A radical (basically center, in this case center left) became prime minister, failed to do anything, Blum had a short lived attempt in 38 to solve things, but fail to get the support to pass the necessary reforms.

After which the Radicals took control and Daladier became prime minister in April 1938, until his government would fall following the Winter War, replaced by Paul Reynaud in March 1940 (Daladier would stay in the government as Defense minister). As Daladier walked back on some reforms, the Front Populaire broke apart then.

None of this is represented or even hinted in game in anyway except for maybe the "revoke the Matignon agreement" decision. Presumably, there should be event, focus and decisions that would cause the change of governement or let you keep Blum depending on your actions. I dare to say that managing to make the Front Populaire holds would make far better alt-history than "what if Napoleon 6 became Emperor and decided to AVENGE WATERLOO"?

Handy Mission Icons - Ok_hand meme mod for EU4.
Muse's Map Package - Scavenged resources from other map mods to create a map with contrast and depth for EU4.
Trapy Mikloş Horthy - A HISTORICAL HoI4 portrait mod for the leader of Hungary. It's also fucking dead.

Ambien

Corporal

The reason is that not much effort was put on France (and most effort actually put was misguided).

Historically Blum's government fell apart in 37, from a combination of disagreement on what to do with Spain, failure to solve the economic crisis, and stopped the social reforms without it really making the opposition stop being antisemitic assholes (Blum was Jewish and criticized for that by the usual people). A radical (basically center, in this case center left) became prime minister, failed to do anything, Blum had a short lived attempt in 38 to solve things, but fail to get the support to pass the necessary reforms.

After which the Radicals took control and Daladier became prime minister in April 1938, until his government would fall following the Winter War, replaced by Paul Reynaud in March 1940 (Daladier would stay in the government as Defense minister). As Daladier walked back on some reforms, the Front Populaire broke apart then.

None of this is represented or even hinted in game in anyway except for maybe the "revoke the Matignon agreement" decision. Presumably, there should be event, focus and decisions that would cause the change of governement or let you keep Blum depending on your actions. I dare to say that managing to make the Front Populaire holds would make far better alt-history than "what if Napoleon 6 became Emperor and decided to AVENGE WATERLOO"?

I have a suggestion for how to reincorporate Daladier in this thread:

Captain

I have a suggestion for how to reincorporate Daladier in this thread:

Actually, from what I can find, Daladier revoked the 40 hours week, which was not strictly part of the Matignon Agreements but rather part of the Popular Front program (then their victory lead to hope for changes and large strikes which ended up with much more being more being attained). I can't find source on him revoking the rest, and at least in the case of the paid vacations I would be surprised that he did.

As for your idea, I guess it's possible and better than nothing but I would find it unsatisfying and a bit boring.

Ambien

Corporal

True enough, but in-game I think the general Popular Front program is given the designation "Matignon Agreements". Julian Jackson's book is a pretty good source in English on the Popular Front.

My idea would be easy enough to implement (could realistically be done in the next update), although I concede it is not the most satisfying. I don't think PDX is going to change the focus tree again, so if you want a more satisfying historical experience, you should try the mod called "France Total Rework". I don't know if that mod works with La Resistance.

Spelaren

Captain

MobiusTwo

First Lieutenant

ZeDango

Corporal

Handy Mission Icons - Ok_hand meme mod for EU4.
Muse's Map Package - Scavenged resources from other map mods to create a map with contrast and depth for EU4.
Trapy Mikloş Horthy - A HISTORICAL HoI4 portrait mod for the leader of Hungary. It's also fucking dead.

Zwirbaum

(Formerly known as Zwireq)

You mean @Bratyn who will be playing in the Chain of Command stream on the PDS/dev team?

Bratyn is still in PDS, he just moved to Imperator team.

Kimidf

Lt. General

True enough, but in-game I think the general Popular Front program is given the designation "Matignon Agreements". Julian Jackson's book is a pretty good source in English on the Popular Front.

My idea would be easy enough to implement (could realistically be done in the next update), although I concede it is not the most satisfying. I don't think PDX is going to change the focus tree again, so if you want a more satisfying historical experience, you should try the mod called "France Total Rework". I don't know if that mod works with La Resistance.

Not me, it would be so forceful in that regard. since the game developers themselves have had to retify their own final trees as a step in the trees of Spain and Portugal due to constant complaints from the community. and I think there is quite a consensus in these complaints about this aspect for the developers to be implementing sooner or later

Indyclone77

Leading Rep on OWB, HOI4 Modding Advocate

"The reason is that not much effort was put on France (and most effort actually put was misguided)."

You're welcome to your opinions on whether the content is good or not but it's insulting to say "not much effort" was put into the French Tree unless I missed your name in the credits for the DLC and you observed it's development?

ZeDango

Corporal

"The reason is that not much effort was put on France (and most effort actually put was misguided)."

You're welcome to your opinions on whether the content is good or not but it's insulting to say "not much effort" was put into the French Tree unless I missed your name in the credits for the DLC and you observed it's development?

Why are you personally trying to dispute his claim as a community member?

If the devs DID put effort in, they can get over here and do it themselves.

Handy Mission Icons - Ok_hand meme mod for EU4.
Muse's Map Package - Scavenged resources from other map mods to create a map with contrast and depth for EU4.
Trapy Mikloş Horthy - A HISTORICAL HoI4 portrait mod for the leader of Hungary. It's also fucking dead.

Captain

"The reason is that not much effort was put on France (and most effort actually put was misguided)."

You're welcome to your opinions on whether the content is good or not but it's insulting to say "not much effort" was put into the French Tree unless I missed your name in the credits for the DLC and you observed it's development?

It's even more insulting to assume that a lot of effort was put into France, because that implies that those efforts were intentionally malicious in order to make France gameplay less enjoyable.

You have a super-long focus tree with quite a few filler focus (the industrial tree and the communist subbranch are particularly egregious in that), when the critical moment is late 39-early 40. This mean that most of the "cool things" you can get, by the time you can get them, don't matter.

I understand that France need to be a challenge, and even if I don't like it I can accept the ridiculous number of factory at start and the three research slots as ways to hamper them because the game can't really reflect how France suffered an humiliating loss despite France and Britain combined having at least as much if not more men and modern material in everything except Aircraft compared to Germany.

But the way it is handled is poor. Disjointed government is pretty bad, because almost everything you do before the war cost pp, which mean you're spending 2-3 years doing nothing waiting for it to go away, which mean that basically none of your ministers matter (which is sad because there's a couple of cool unique ones). It is egregiously bad when compared to Spain, for which there's the neat idea of having the buildup to the civil war being handled by decisions. Something similar could have been used for France, to act as a pp sink while still leaving a feeling of choice and doing something to the player.

And the political tensions aren't really represented aside from the "political violence" spirit which just make you wait for taking some national focus (and if you can't wait you can always take another focus to remove it at the cost a few stab. It was a period where L'Action Française was outright calling for Blum to be murdered (and he was violently assaulted in Febuary 1936), and the right-wing press in general was extremely vicious against him. The Front Popular abstained from intervening in Spain partly because of fear of a right wing coup.

Then there's the alt-history path. I will admit I haven't looked much at the Fascist path since I have little interest in it, though at first glance it doesn't seems to be bad. But the Monarchist path, despite being popular, is quite uninspired. The return of the monarchy would deserve more than taking two focus, waiting a year, then taking a third one. The Napoleonic path is just a string of wargoals for vague reasons such as "avenge Waterloo" and go to war with Britain for reasons (also conquering the Benelux and everyone being fine with it). Napoleon 6 was a resistant and war hero, and an interesting figure, he deserves better than simply trying to outdo his great-great-uncle. The Legitimist path meanwhile is lacking in direction, and to a smaller extend so is the Orleanist path past kicking the Fascists asses.

Finally, while I will admit that the gimmick of the industrial tree is kind of neat, it just doesn't work that well for France.